National Academies report identifies ways to reduce intergenerational poverty in US

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 25, 2023 — A report released Thursday, Sept. 21, by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies evidence-based programs and policies, such as increased K-12 spending for school districts serving low-income students, to combat intergenerational poverty in the United States.

UAH researcher to study life expectancy inequities in Alabama through $25K Johns Hopkins Bloomberg American Health Initiatives grant

Dr. Azita Amiri, an associate professor with the College of Nursing at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System, has been awarded a $25,000 Network of Practice Grant by the Bloomberg American Health Initiatives, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, to examine life expectancy inequities in Alabama.

Study Uncovers Barriers to Mammography Screening Among Black Women

The study finds utilization of annual screening mammograms suboptimal among low-income Black women with several reported perceived and actual barriers. Most had a low breast cancer risk perception. Interestingly, participants perceived mammograms as very beneficial: 80 percent believed that ‘if breast cancer is found early, it’s likely that the cancer can be successfully treated;’ 90 percent indicated that ‘having a mammogram could help find breast cancer when it is first getting started.’

Life stressors may contribute to multiple sclerosis flares, disability

Stressors across the lifespan — including poverty, abuse and divorce — are associated with worsening health and functional outcomes for people with multiple sclerosis, a new study finds. Researchers say the findings can inform MS research as well as clinical care, including referrals to mental health or substance use support.

New book explores ways to combat economic injustice in America

How can the United States, one of the wealthiest nations on earth, have the highest rates of poverty among industrialized nations? In a new book based on decades of research, renowned poverty expert Mark Rank, a professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, develops a unique perspective for understanding this puzzle.

URI professor discusses worsening child labor in the United States

With the issue of child labor in the U.S. – particularly among migrant children – coming under new scrutiny, URI Professor of Political Science Brendan Skip Mark lends his expertise to provide context around the issue. Prof. Mark is co-director of the CIRIGHTS data project – the world’s largest quantitative dataset on global human rights.

Inaugural Pitt report finds caregivers with disabilities face poverty, health issues – need policy support

Caregivers with their own disabilities face a litany of complications while trying to tend to aging or ailing spouses and partners: health problems, mental health difficulties, work issues, even financial and healthcare strains, according to the inaugural white paper from a University of Pittsburgh center studying caregiving.

UA Little Rock Researchers Out to Uncover the Secrets of Personal Transformation Rooted in Heifer International’s Community-Building Efforts

An interdisciplinary research team from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock is investigating the personal transformation effects of Heifer International’s efforts to end poverty and build sustainable communities across the globe.Heifer International has a vision to explore the nature of personal transformation around the glove and measure its impact at the individual level.

CHOP Study Finds Neighborhood Poverty and Crowding Associated with Higher Rates of COVID-19 in Pregnancy

Neighborhood characteristics, including poverty and crowding within homes, were associated with higher rates of SARS-CoV-2 in pregnancy during the prevaccination era of the pandemic, according to a new study led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, which were published today in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, may partially explain the high rates of COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, among Black and Hispanic patients.

How recovery from COVID-19 and climate policies might affect the use of “clean” cooking fuels

A group of IIASA researchers shows how recovery from the pandemic and climate mitigation policies might affect access to clean fuels.

Finding pathways for sustainable development in Africa

A new project funded by the Belmont Forum will develop novel tools and capacities to understand and manage interlinkages between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and support sustainable development pathways for African countries.

Even small bills for health insurance may cause healthy low-income people to drop coverage

Twenty dollars a month might not seem like a lot to pay for health insurance. But for people getting by on $15,000 a year, it’s enough to make some drop their coverage – especially if they’re healthy. That could keep them from getting preventive or timely care, and could leave their insurance company with a sicker pool of patients than before.

FAU/NCHA Community Health Center First University in Florida to Receive HRSA Designation

The FAU/NCHA Community Health Center is the first university in Florida to be designated by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), as a “Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) Look-Alike. To receive this designation, organizations must operate and provide services consistent with HRSA’s Health Center Program requirements to ensure health care for underserved communities and vulnerable populations in the U.S. through service provision to all, regardless of ability to pay.

What we don’t understand about poverty in America

What if the idealized image of American society — a land of opportunity that will reward hard work with economic success — is completely wrong?“Poorly Understood: What America Gets Wrong About Poverty,” a new book from Mark Rank, a leading academic expert on poverty, explores this concept.It is the first book to systematically address and confront many of the most widespread myths pertaining to poverty.

Air pollution spikes linked to lower test scores for Salt Lake County third graders

More frequent exposure to air pollution spikes were associated with reduced test scores for third graders in Salt Lake County. Schools with a higher proportion of students of color and from households experiencing poverty were exposed to more peak pollution days than were schools serving middle- to upper- class and predominately white students.

Study Shows Socioeconomic Status Linked to Heart Failure Mortality in United States

A variety of treatments exist to address heart disease, yet it continues to carry a poor prognosis. A new study from University Hospitals showed that a person’s address can help predict their chance of mortality from heart disease.

New Study Finds Racial Disparities in COVID-19-related Deaths Exist Beyond Income Differences in 10 Large U.S. Cities

New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major U.S. cities. The researchers found that non-white counties had higher cumulative incidences and deaths compared to predominantly white counties—and this was true for both low-income and high-income communities.

Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults, study finds

The most vulnerable residents of Michigan say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in the state’s expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Those with extremely low incomes or multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts. But participants of all backgrounds reported improvements.