A leader’s gender plays a role in local government sustainability policymaking

When it comes to local government, does the gender of a mayor or county executive matter in sustainability policymaking? Yes, but only in certain ways, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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She Votes: Women, the Workplace, and Pandemic Politics

Washington, D.C. (March 16, 2021)—The Covid-19 pandemic has upended the lives and careers of millions of women, highlighted inequities in health care, education and the economy, and underscored the importance of electing women to political office, according to a new online survey [link to the survey] released today by Gender on the Ballot, a partnership between the Women & Politics Institute at American University’s School of Public Affairs and the Barbara Lee Family Foundation. Benenson Strategy Group conducted the survey, She Votes, which aimed to explore the issues shaping women voters and their political opinions one year after the start of the pandemic.
“Women faced unprecedented adversity over the course of the last year, and we now know that they are reckoning with the political and cultural systems that shape their professional and personal lives,” said Betsy Fischer Martin, Executive Director of the Women & Politics Institute. “She Votes delivers insights about what issues a

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Vice Presidential Vogue: Kamala Harris and White House Fashion

As Kamala Harris stood beside newly sworn-in President Joe Biden last week, all eyes were on her as she made history as the nation’s first female vice president.  But, much like other prominent women who have walked the halls of the White House before her, cultural experts expect that there will be  just as much focus on her fashion statements as on her political ones — and the scrutiny may be intensified as the first woman and person of color in the VP position takes on stereotypes surrounding Eurocentric standards of beauty.

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Changes in political administration come with increased danger of international conflict

A new paper including faculty at Binghamton University suggests that when democratic publics vote out an administration, this change comes with an increase in the danger of undesirable conflict.

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Is compromise possible in a split Senate?

The Democrats’ dual victories in Georgia’s runoff election on Jan. 5, created a rare 50-50 split in the U.S. Senate and will give majority power to the Democrats once Vice President-elect Kamala Harris — potentially, the deciding vote — is sworn into office on Jan. 20.Given how divided politics in America has become, will the tied Senate be in constant gridlock?Not necessarily.

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What are the promises and perils of geoengineering?

In a new book, “Has It Come to This? The Promises and Perils of Geoengineering on the Brink,” Holly Jean Buck and colleagues weigh in on social, ethical and political dimensions of deliberate, large-scale interventions in the planet’s climate.

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Massive dataset reveals which governments have best responded to COVID-19 pandemic

Are our political institutions up for the task of managing the COVID-19 pandemic and any possible future similar threats? A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has compiled an extensive dataset tracking public health government responses to COVID-19 at national and subnational levels of government throughout the world.

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Surgeon General expects COVID-19 vaccine to be available by year’s end

In a wide-ranging talk with UCLA Health physicians, Wednesday, Oct. 28, United States Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, addressed the politicization of the pandemic and the means of containing the spread of COVID-19. He also offered hope that a vaccine for the virus will be available by year’s end.

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Facing up to the reality of politicians’ Instagram posts

A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians’ faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings.

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Cognitive decline distorts political choices, UCI-led study says

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 29, 2020 — Identification along the liberal/conservative spectrum may last a lifetime, but cognitive decline distorts our political choices, according to the first-of-its-kind study led by the University of California, Irvine. For those who are cognitively impaired, identifying as being liberal or conservative loses its relationship to their political decision-making.

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Who’s lying, black hair and politics, and can we be civil in 2020: 7 Election Stories Your Subscribers Will Read

Cal State Fullerton scholars with expertise in topics ranging from spotting liars, and the art of debate to local ballot propositions, voting security and virtual debates can offer your continued election coverage new angles and depth.

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Menacing Assaults on Science Causing Alarming and Avoidable Deaths in the U.S.

In early 2016, the U.S. was judged to have been best prepared for the existential threat of a pandemic, but turned out to be the least prepared for the actual threat. In a commentary, researchers say that “pandemic politics” is causing assaults on science, the FDA and CDC. They say that politicization of the FDA and CDC is creating continued losses of trust by the U.S. public and continued harm to their longstanding reputations of respect and admiration worldwide.

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Third Party Candidates and the 2020 Election: UNLV Expert Available

For months, two names — presidential candidates Donald Trump and Joe Biden — have consistently dominated news headlines and social media feeds in the leadup to Election Day 2020. Some, however, might be left wondering, especially following the chaotic presidential debate just last week, if Trump and Biden are the only options out there.

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Expert Available: Supreme Court Nominations 101

Lady Justice and Lady Liberty. Strong female symbols have long been used to represent the embodiment of American ideals and freedom. So, it almost seems fitting that two women — the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and President Donald Trump’s presumptive replacement nominee Amy Coney Barrett — are at the heart of tensions over a vacancy on the country’s highest court.

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Political Polarization: Often Not as Bad as We Think

As politics grows increasingly polarized, a new global study finds people often exaggerate political differences and negative feelings of those on the opposite side of the political divide, and this misperception can be reduced by informing them of the other side’s true feelings. The study replicates earlier research in the United States, finding the phenomenon to be generalizable across 25 countries.

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Presidential Debates in a Highly Polarized America: UNLV Expert Available

The COVID-19 pandemic. Race relations. The Supreme Court. The economy. When President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden meet for the first of three presidential debates on Tuesday night, millions of viewers are expected to tune in. But will America really be listening? Given the country’s all-time high partisanship and the extremely tiny pool of voters who have yet to make up their minds five weeks out from the 2020 general election, analysts are putting in their bets on the influence of televised debates and the chances of actually swaying voters.

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Momentum of unprecedented Chilean uprising stalled by COVID-19 pandemic

The uprising that erupted in fall 2019 in Chile against the post-dictatorship government may be diminished by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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