Study Finds Signs of Altruism in People’s COVID-19 Worries, Putting Concerns about Others First

When it comes to worrying about the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study demonstrates that people are more concerned about whether their family members could contract the virus or if they are unknowingly spreading the virus themselves than they are with contracting it. The study, conducted by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, also shows how increased resilience is able to reduce rates of anxiety and depression during the pandemic.

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Dealing with COVID-19 Anxiety & Stress on the Front Lines: Wolters Kluwer Podcasts Offer Physicians and Nurses Tools for Coping

Many frontline clinicians are finding themselves confronted with an often-overlooked aspect of pandemics like COVID-19 that can be as important as understanding its symptoms and progression – identifying and managing anxiety and stress in themselves and their patients. Recognizing this, Wolters Kluwer, Health is providing free access to podcasts and other resources aimed at helping those on the frontlines cope with the uncertainty and strain from COVID-19.

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HEALTH CARE, MASS SHOOTINGS, 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAUSING AMERICANS SIGNIFICANT STRESS, NEW STRESS IN AMERICA™ SURVEY FINDS

A year before the 2020 presidential election, Americans report various issues in the news as significant sources of stress, including health care, mass shootings and the upcoming election, according to this year’s Stress in America™ survey by the American Psychological Association (APA). More than half of U.S. adults (56%) identify the 2020 presidential election as a significant stressor, an increase from the 52% of adults who reported the presidential election as a significant source of stress when asked in the months leading up to the 2016 contest.

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