Awake prone positioning does not offer benefit in reducing intubation for COVID-19 induced acute respiratory failure

A large multicenter, randomized clinical trial revealed no difference in the risk of endotracheal intubation requirement at 30 days between awake prone positioning and standard positioning for patients with COVID-19 who suffered from acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, according to research published in JAMA by researchers at UTHealth Houston.

The COVID-19 pandemic increased depression among young adults, particularly women

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on many people’s lives. Emerging adults may have been particular impacted, given their transition from adolescence to adulthood during such a time of upheaval, with their educational and career aspirations thrown into disarray. A new study has found that the risk for depression tripled among young people – particularly younger women – during the pandemic, and that this risk persisted into 2021.

Newer COVID-19 Subvariants Are Less Vulnerable to Immunity Induced by Vaccination and Previous Infection, Researchers Find

In a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine, physician-scientists report that the three Omicron subvariants currently dominant in the United States – officially known as subvariants BA.2.12.1, BA.4, and BA.5 – substantially escape neutralizing antibodies induced by both vaccination and previous infection.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop Machine Learning Model that Can Detect and Predict COVID-19 from Collected Data on Wearable Devices

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that can determine if an individual has SARS-CoV-2 infections, the virus that causes COVID-19—with a high sensitivity and specificity—from the data collected by wearable devices.

New study finds COVID-19 booster increases antibodies by more than 85% in nursing home residents and their caregivers

The study found that Omicron-specific antibodies reached detectable levels in 86% of nursing home residents and 93% of healthcare workers after receiving the booster shot, compared to just 28% of nursing home residents and healthcare workers after the initial two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series.

Study in Chinese City Finds Children Spread COVID-19 Easier and Lockdowns Worked

Using high quality COVID-19 data from a northern Chinese city, two UAlbany researchers concluded that young people were most responsible for an increase in direct and secondary infections, and also determined that county-wide lockdowns proved effective in stemming the spread of the virus.

University of Pennsylvania’s First NFT Commemorates mRNA Research

The historic scientific breakthrough at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that helped lead the world’s fight against COVID-19 through mRNA-based vaccines is being commemorated through a non-fungible token—a digital asset to be auctioned by Christie’s—that will support ongoing research at Penn.

Broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide immunity against SARS-CoV-2 variants

Two broadly neutralizing antibodies show great promise to provide long-acting immunity against COVID-19 in immunocompromised populations according to a paper published June 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The antibodies were effective against all SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern tested and could be used alone or in an antibody cocktail to diminish the risk of infection.

New research at UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital evaluates critical illness from COVID-19 vs influenza in children

Researchers at UH Rainbow published new findings that COVID-19 is not equivalent to flu infection for children. Among 66 pediatric ICUs in the US, the number admitted each quarter with COVID-19 or MIS-C during the first 15 months of the pandemic was twice as high as that for flu pre-pandemic.

SEIR Model to Address the Impact of Face Masks amid COVID-19 Pandemic

When vaccines are not available, alternative strategies are required to decrease SARS-CoV-2 transmission. Behavior of the population and government regulations, such as hand hygiene, quarantine of exposed persons, isolation of symptomatic persons, and travel restriction, play an essential role in…

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop a Rapid Test to Measure Immunity to COVID-19

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a rapid blood assay that measures the magnitude and duration of someone’s immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This test will allow large-scale monitoring of the population’s immunity and the effectiveness of current vaccines to help design revaccination strategies for vulnerable immunosuppressed individuals, according to a study published in Nature Biotechnology in June.

COVID-19 vaccination appears to be safe for patients treated for hypothyroidism

Inactivated and mRNA COVID-19 vaccines appear to be safe for patients treated for hypothyroidism,
according to a new study being presented at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga. The study found these vaccines do not cause significant fluctuations in thyroid function and are not associated with increased risks of emergency department visits or unscheduled hospitalizations.

Heart Failure Patients Unvaccinated Against COVID-19 Are Three Times More Likely to Die From It Than Boosted Heart Failure Patients

EMBARGOED UNTIL JUNE 9, 2022, 10AM EST (New York, NY – June 9, 2022) – Heart failure patients who are unvaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are three times more likely to die if infected with the virus…

Mount Sinai Researchers Awarded $16 Million to Develop Antivirals Against Viruses With Pandemic Potential

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have been awarded an initial $16 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to discover and develop globally accessible and affordable novel oral antivirals to combat COVID-19 and future pandemics.

HOW WILL HUMANS SURVIVE A GLOBAL CATASTROPHE?

One suggested way to save humankind in the event of a deadly pandemic or other extreme global catastrophe is establishing a safe refuge – on an island or in such far-out places as the moon or under water — where a portion of the human population can stay alive.

Americans More Likely to Seek Surgical Care During a Pandemic if They and Hospital Staff are Vaccinated

Americans are more likely to have surgery during a pandemic such as COVID-19 if they are vaccinated, the hospital staff are vaccinated, the surgery is urgent or lifesaving (as opposed to elective), and the surgery is outpatient (i.e., not requiring an overnight stay), according to a new study published in Vaccine.

Frontier supercomputer debuts as world’s fastest, breaking exascale barrier

The Frontier supercomputer at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory earned the top ranking today as the world’s fastest on the 59th TOP500 list, with 1.1 exaflops of performance. The system is the first to achieve an unprecedented level of computing performance known as exascale, a threshold of a quintillion calculations per second.

Long COVID poses risks to vaccinated people, too

Vaccinated people with mild breakthrough COVID-19 infections can experience debilitating, lingering symptoms that affect the heart, brain, lungs and other parts of the body, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. However, a new study of more than 13 million veterans also found that vaccination against the virus that causes COVID-19 reduced the risk of death by 34% and the risk of getting long COVID-19 by 15%, compared with unvaccinated patients infected with the virus.

Most COVID-19 long-haulers continue to experience neurologic symptoms, fatigue, and compromised quality of life 15 months after initial infection

A new study published in Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology looked at the evolution of neurologic symptoms in non-hospitalized COVID-19 long-haulers at the Northwestern Medicine Neuro COVID-19 Clinic and discovered most long-haulers continue to experience symptoms such as brain fog, numbness/tingling, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, tinnitus and fatigue on average of 15 months after disease onset.

New study informs mitigation strategies for contrast shortage in CT by identifying promising areas of focus

The current shortage of iodinated contrast in the United States due to the COVID-19 related production shutdown in China is causing severe disruptions in patient care. A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study outlines the most frequently used computed tomography services performed on Medicare beneficiaries as focus areas for mitigation strategies for the greatest overall impact.

Many Historically “Redlined” California Communities Have Higher COVID-19 Incidence and Mortality

One of the legacies of “redlining” may be higher incidence and mortality rates of COVID-19 affecting the largely minority and poor residents of these neighborhoods, according to research published at the ATS 2022 international conference. ” Redlining is a Great Depression-era federal policy in which neighborhoods with large ethnic/racial minority groups were denied federal resources.

Mount Sinai Receives Landmark Gift from Royalty Pharma to Advance Health Equity

Marking a major advance in its efforts to achieve equity in the delivery of health care, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Icahn Mount Sinai) announced today that its Institute for Health Equity Research (IHER) has received a landmark $20 million gift over five years from Royalty Pharma plc (Nasdaq: RPRX) and certain members of its management team.