@UBuffalo biochemist @SurteesJennifer warns that the delta variant is particularly an issue for those individuals who are not vaccinated or are under vaccinated (i.e. 1 shot).

Expert: Jennifer Surtees, PhD, associate professor of biochemistry in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. Surtees and her colleagues at UB’s New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences have…

Researchers Develop More Reliable Rapid Tests for COVID-19

Researchers Develop More Reliable Rapid Tests for COVID-19
Public Release Date: 15-Jun-2021 00:00:00 US Eastern Time (24hr)
Research News Release
Contact Person: Deborah Kotz
Contact Phone: 410-706-4255
Contact E-mail: [email protected]
Journal: Nature Protocols
DOI: 10.1038/s41596-021-00546-w
Funder:
Grant Number(s):
Meeting:
Primary Keyword:
Medicine/Health

Keywords:
Medicine/Health -> Diagnostics
Medicine/Health -> Infectious/Emerging Diseases
Subtitle:
Tests Use Innovative Techniques That Improve Accuracy Rivaling Gold Standard PCR Test
Summary:
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed two rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 that are nearly as accurate as the gold-standard test currently used in laboratories. Unlike the gold standard test, which extracts RNA and uses it to amplify the DNA of the virus, these new tests can detect the presence of the virus in as little as five minutes using different methods.

SARS-CoV-2 Worldwide Replication Drives Rapid Rise and Selection of Mutations

The number of COVID-19 variants is growing rapidly, so much that the scale and scope of mutation may pose a threat to the continuing successful use of the current vaccines and therapies. The findings, by an international team that includes University of California researchers, are being published in the June edition of the peer-reviewed journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The pace of variation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus strains makes plain the threat that rapidly evolving new strains might give rise to escape variants, capable of limiting the efficacy of vaccines, therapies, and diagnostic tests.

Southwest National Primate Research Center at Texas Biomed receives $37 million NIH grant

The Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) at Texas Biomed has been awarded more than $37 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue operations into 2026. The P51 grant, given by the NIH Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, provides essential funding to house and care for nearly 2,500 non-human primates that are part of life-science research programs at Texas Biomed and partners around the globe.

Study Links COVID-19 Public Health Efforts to Dramatic Drop in COPD Hospitalizations

Public health measures designed to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus may have fostered a substantial side benefit: A 53 percent drop in hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), likely due to a drop in circulating seasonal respiratory viruses such as influenza.

Immune Responses After COVID-19 Vaccination in Kidney Transplant Recipients and Patients on Dialysis

• A large majority of patients with kidney failure on dialysis—but not kidney transplant recipients—developed antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 after COVID-19 vaccination.
• Vaccination also led to strong T cell responses against the virus that causes COVID-19 in all patients on dialysis, and in nearly 58% of kidney transplant recipients.

Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants

In a new study published in Nature, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of BIDMC’s Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, and colleagues report on the antibody and cellular immune responses generated by the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine against the original viral strain and against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. The team found that this vaccine induced immune responses against all the viral variants.

How a Global Pandemic Changed the Way We Eat and Shop

Studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into how people ate, shopped and felt about food as the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded. Studying these trends can shed light on potential lingering health impacts of the pandemic and inform responses to future emergencies.

New Research Shows Trend Toward Unhealthy Eating During Pandemic

As COVID-19 spread throughout the world, our daily routines and behaviors changed drastically. A new study of more than 2,000 people in the U.S. found that the pandemic has also affected how we eat. The authors found a decrease in the consumption of many food groups, particularly healthy foods such as vegetables and whole grains, compared to before the pandemic.

Covid-19 vaccines also protect unvaccinated family members

Researchers at the Helsinki Graduate School of Economics have found that the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines protect both vaccinated individuals and their unvaccinated adult household members against SARS-CoV-2 infections. The study, not yet peer-reviewed, used Finnish administrative datasets to examine the link between mRNA-based Covid-19 vaccines and infection risk among vaccinated individuals as well as their unvaccinated family members.

Most New Jerseyans Support Fully Reopening Public Schools in Fall, Requiring Vaccinations for Healthcare Workers, Rutgers Poll Shows

As vaccination rates increase and prospects of normal life return more than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, New Jerseyans differ on various aspects of this “new normal” and how comfortable they feel, according to the latest Rutgers-Eagleton Poll.

Dip your toe – or dive right in: WVU psychologists spill advice on reentering the world post-COVID

A high percentage of the population may experience “re-entry anxiety” as more people get vaccinated, guidelines are loosened and the masks come off, according to WVU psychologists.

Disparities in COVID-19 Rates among Adults with Kidney Failure in New York City

• Among adults with kidney failure undergoing hemodialysis in New York City, Black and Hispanic patients were more likely to develop symptomatic COVID-19 than White patients.
• Neighborhood-level social vulnerability factors were associated with COVID-19 incidence among White patients, but these factors did not explain racial/ethnic disparities.

Preclinical research reveals that new IgM antibodies administered intranasally to fight COVID-19 more potent than commonly used ones

A nasal therapy, built upon on the application of a new engineered IgM antibody therapy for COVID-19, was more effective than commonly used IgG antibodies at neutralizing the COVID-19 virus in animal models, according to research recently published by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB Health), the University of Houston, and IGM Biosciences, Inc.

Tip Sheet: Massive unmet needs in COVID-19 treatment, osteoporosis drugs for breast cancer, new bladder cancer target — and AIDS at 40

SEATTLE — June 2, 2021 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news. If you are covering news at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (June 4-8), check out our ASCO page highlighting Fred Hutch presentations and feel free to reach out to our media team for help sourcing experts: [email protected]

Study Provides New Insights on COVID-19 Risk in Patients Receiving Dialysis

• Among individuals with kidney failure who received dialysis at clinics several times each week, COVID-19 risks were higher in patients who were older, had diabetes, lived in local communities with higher COVID-19 rates, and received dialysis at clinics that served a larger number of patients.
• Risks were lower in patients who received dialysis in clinics with a higher number of available side rooms and that had mask policies for asymptomatic patients.

Houston Methodist and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services partner to expand access to COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatment

Houston Methodist announced today, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), that it has expanded access to COVID-19 monoclonal antibody therapy (mAb) in the Greater Houston area. The promising treatment has been shown to keep high-risk COVID-19 patients out of the hospital and reduce the likelihood of progression to severe disease.

Survey Finds Regional, Racial Divides in K-12 Remote Schooling Impact During Pandemic

More than 70% of K-12 students across the country experienced some remote schooling during the 2020-21 school year, with stark differences emerging along regional and racial lines and the worst effects on students’ social relationships, according to a new, nationally representative study conducted by Ipsos, using its KnowledgePanel, for the Tufts University Research Group on Equity in Health, Wealth and Civic Engagement.

Penn Medicine Launches Region’s First Post-COVID-19 Neurological Care Clinic

As many as one in three COVID-19 survivors experience a mental health or neurological disorder, adding to a growing body of evidence that show COVID-19 can have serious and potentially long-lasting effects on the brain. The Penn Neuro COVID Clinic aims to assess and treat long-haul COVID patients suffering from neurological symptoms.

Why are some Covid-19 vaccines working better for men than women?

If there’s one take-home message for the general public about the coronavirus vaccines approved in the U.S., it’s that they are remarkably effective. But Michigan State University’s Morteza Mahmoudi is raising awareness about an important subtlety: The vaccines developed by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech appear to work slightly better for men than for women.

Penn Nursing-led Philly Team Awarded $1.4 Million NIH Grant to Expand COVID-19 Outreach

José A. Bauermeister, PhD, and Antonia M. Villarruel, PhD, are leading one of 10 new research teams from across the country that received National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants totaling $14 million to extend the reach of the NIH’s Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities. The Philly CEAL team was awarded $1.4 million from the NIH with additional support from Penn Nursing and The University of Pennsylvania, bringing the total for the alliance to $1.53 million.

Survey: Despite Similar Levels of Vaccine Hesitancy, White People More Likely to Be Vaccinated Than Black People

White people are more likely to have been vaccinated than Black people despite similar levels of vaccine hesitancy, or saying they are very unlikely to get a vaccine. Therefore, access to vaccines and other factors could be limiting vaccination efforts, according to a new, nationally representative study from the Tufts University Research Group on Equity in Health, Wealth and Civic Engagement.

Meeting Preview: Hot Topics at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE

Reporters and bloggers are invited to join top nutrition researchers and practitioners for a dynamic virtual program at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. The flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition runs June 7–10, 2021 and features research announcements, expert discussions and more.