COVID-19 associated with increased risk for autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases up to a year after infection

A large, binational study found that SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with an increased risk for autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) that extends up to 12 months after infection. The risk was found to be higher with greater severity of acute COVID-19, even among those who were vaccinated. These findings suggest that care strategies for patients who survive COVID-19 should pay close attention to manifestations of AIRD, particularly after severe illness. The study is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

MSU co-authored study: 10 insights to reduce vaccine hesitancy on social media

Young Anna Argyris, associate professor in the Michigan State University Department of Media and Information, is part of an international team studying the detrimental effects of vaccine misinformation on social media and interventions that can increase vaccine uptake behaviors.

Study Could Help Clear Up Confusion and Hesitancy Surrounding RSV Vaccines

Efforts to vaccinate vulnerable populations against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) faced an uphill battle this season. However, now a new study by researchers at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) could help to combat RSV vaccine misinformation and quell vaccine…

Researchers Use a Novel Approach to Design a COVID-19 Antiviral Drug

Researchers combined the features of clinical drugs to treat hepatitis C and viruses similar to COVID-19. This allowed them to synthesize BBH-1, a promising inhibitor that targets the breakdown of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The researchers characterized samples using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques to provide atomic-level insights on the structure of the BBH-1 inhibitor and how it binds to the SARS-CoV-2 protein.

New Insights on Long COVID

David Winter, MD, at Baylor Scott & White Health, answers the most common patient questions and reacts to the latest medical research. What is long COVID, and how common is it? (SOT@ :14, TRT :32) Why do some people get…

Domestic violence involving firearms increased in Chicago, Los Angeles and Nashville during pandemic

Domestic violence went down or stayed the same during the first 10 months of the COVID-19 pandemic in five major U.S. cities. However, domestic violence involving firearms increased in three of those cities, according to a new UC Davis study published in the Journal of Family Violence.

Researchers Show SARS-Cov-2 Infection Affects Energy Stores in the Body, Causing Organ Failure

An international research team, including Jonathan C. Schisler, PhD, in the UNC School of Medicine, has found how SARS-CoV-2 causes widespread “energy outages” throughout major organs, and how these effects contribute to debilitating long COVID symptoms.

Nirmatrelvir-ritonavir not effective for reducing most post-COVID-19 conditions

A trial emulation study of veterans with COVID-19 found that the use of the antiviral nirmatrelvir–ritonavir was not effective for reducing the risk for many post-COVID-19 conditions, including cardiac, pulmonary, renal, gastrointestinal, neurologic, mental health, musculoskeletal, or endocrine symptoms. Nirmatrelvir–ritonavir was associated only with a reduced risk for combined thromboembolic events. The study is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Post-COVID condition is not linked to ongoing infection or active brain damage

Post COVID-19 condition does not appear to be linked to direct viral invasion of the brain or active brain damage. This has been shown by a study at the University of Gothenburg. Searching for abnormal biomarkers among the participants yielded no hits in either blood or cerebrospinal fluid samples

Medicine on the base of vitamin B6 improves memory and decreases fatigue after COVID

Scientists have showed that medicine on the base of vitamin B6 can be used for treatment of post-COVID asthenia – condition when patients complain of rapid fatigability, problems with memory and sleep. Taking of this product enabled 35% patients to improve memory, 40% patients began to sleep well, 42% of people began to get tired more slowly. Besides this taking this medicine enabled patients to experience physical activity easier. Results of the research are published in Magazine of Infectology.

Holy immunity! Bat genes key against COVID, cancer

Bats have acquired remarkable traits throughout their evolution. They’re the only mammals that can fly, and they live much longer than other animals their size. But perhaps most impressive is their robust immune system. It protects bats from viruses that wreak havoc in humans, like COVID-19 or Ebola. It also keeps bats relatively cancer-free. How? According to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists, it’s all in the genes.

GW Experts Available: CDC Report Finds Older Adults Make Up Two-Thirds of Covid-19 Hospitalizations

WASHINGTON (October 11, 2023) – According to a recent report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults 65 and older accounted for nearly two-thirds of Covid-19 hospitalizations in the United States this year, 61% of intensive care unit admissions and…

Free At-Home COVID Tests and Paxlovid

David Winter, MD, at Baylor Scott & White Health, answers the most common patient questions and reacts to the latest medical research. Are COVID cases starting to go down? (SOT@ :14, TRT :49) How reliable are at-home COVID tests? Can…

Virginia Tech’s Linsey Marr named 2023 MacArthur Fellow

Linsey Marr, the Charles P. Lunsford Professor and a University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech, has been named a 2023 MacArthur Fellow, a highly prestigious award commonly called a “genius grant.” The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced Wednesday that Marr is one of 20 fellows who will receive an $800,000 award.

MSU expert: What to know about flu, RSV, new COVID-19 variant and new vaccine

The new COVID-19 EG.5 variant is responsible for around 22% of current cases. The World Health Organization has classified it as a “variant of interest,” meaning countries should monitor it more closely than other strains — and cases have only increased in the past few weeks. Peter Gulick is an expert on infectious diseases, and he provides insight on what this new variant could mean and what you should know.

Initiative to Strengthen Response to Infectious Disease Outbreaks in the Mountain West

The COVID-19 pandemic spotlighted how a rapid and effective response to infectious disease outbreaks is critical for saving lives and protecting communities. With a $17.5 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), University of Utah researchers, in collaboration with Washington State University, are leading efforts to provide data and tools that guide decisions to improve responses to emerging public health threats in the Mountain West.

Katalin Karikó and Drew Weissman, Penn’s Historic mRNA Vaccine Research Team, Win 2023 Nobel Prize in Medicine

PHILADELPHIA – The University of Pennsylvania messenger RNA pioneers whose years of scientific partnership unlocked understanding of how to modify mRNA to make it an effective therapeutic—enabling a platform used to rapidly develop lifesaving vaccines amid the global COVID-19 pandemic—have been named winners of the 2023 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Rutgers Experts on School Climate and Conditions for Learning Available to Comment on Post-COVID Educational Challenges

Dr. Alicia Raia-Hawrylak, Co-Project Manager for the School Climate Transformation Project (SCTP), is available to comment on post-COVID concerns related to school climate, including student behavior and bullying, social and emotional learning, staff retention, and using data to guide the…

The Latest in Science and Medical Advancement in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery to be Presented at AAO-HNSF Annual Meeting

The latest research and advances in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in Nashville, Tennessee, during the AAO-HNSF 2023 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, September 30 – October 4.

Global background rates study analyzes data from 197 million people for assessment of COVID-19 vaccine safety

The US CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) funded Global COVID Vaccine Safety Project has generated background incidence rates on a range of conditions designated as AESI (Adverse Events of Special Interest) for COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring. Conditions studied included myocarditis, pulmonary embolism, and Guillain-Barré syndrome.

ACP issues updated Rapid, Living Practice Points on treating COVID-19 patients in outpatient settings

In an updated rapid, living practice points, the American College of Physicians (ACP) summarizes the latest evidence on the use of pharmacologic and biologic treatments of COVID-19 in the outpatient setting, specifically addressing the dominant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant. The paper is published in Annals of Internal Medicine