Rutgers Global Health Expert Available to Discuss the Global Need for More COVID-19 Vaccines

Rutgers global health expert Richard Marlink, M.D., is available to discuss the importance of prioritizing vaccinations in low- to middle-income countries that need it the most, following President Biden’s pledge to donate an additional 500 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19…

Poorly Circulated Room Air Raises Potential Exposure to Contaminants by up to 6 Times

Having good room ventilation to dilute and disperse indoor air pollutants has long been recognized, and with the COVID-19 pandemic its importance has become all the more heightened. But new experiments by Berkeley Lab indoor air researchers show that certain circumstances will result in poor mixing of room air, meaning airborne contaminants may not be effectively dispersed and removed by building level ventilation.

Understanding the Difference between COVID-19 Symptoms and Sinus Disease

This public education campaign was created to give the millions of sinus sufferers around the world access to patient focused, trusted information about their sinus symptoms and conditions, and to differentiate smell loss related to colds, allergies, sinus issues, and COVID-19.

Chula Marketing Guru Cautioned Entrepreneurs Against “3Ps of Business Taboos” to Survive the Fourth Wave of COVID-19

Chula marketing professor from the Faculty of Commerce and Accountancy warned entrepreneurs of the “3Ps” of things they should not do, and to hang on to their hope. This fourth wave of COVID-19 too shall soon pass.

Three State and Federal Grants Fund Campaign to Encourage COVID-19 Vaccination Among People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Faculty at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinicians at the Rose F. Kennedy Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center (CERC) at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore have received three state and federal grants to address health disparities by promoting COVID-19 vaccination among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), their families, and caretakers in New York State.

For My Lung Health Campaign Named APEX Award Winner

For My Lung Health, the joint American Thoracic Society and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) campaign, is the winner of this year’s Pharmaceutical Executive APEX Awards in the respiratory category. The campaign, made possible by an educational grant from GlaxoSmithKline with additional support from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., was launched in response to COVID-19.

More than 90% of U.S. Employers Surveyed Require or Encourage Covid-19 Vaccinations

On the heels of the Biden administration’s announcement advising workplaces to encourage employee vaccinations, a comprehensive business survey conducted by Arizona State University’s College of Health Solutions, with support from The Rockefeller Foundation, found that 93% of the 1,143 U.S. employers surveyed in August currently require or encourage employee vaccinations.

COVID-19 transmission risks rise during labor with patients’ heavier breathing

Some medical procedures can put health care workers at higher risk for contracting COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases. With these high-risk procedures, it’s important that health care providers have access to personal protective equipment (PPE), including N95 masks. However, not all procedures that may seem high risk have that designation.

Netflix Leaders to Deliver Opening Keynote at 30th Annual CFES Brilliant Pathways Global Conference

Few companies can speak to the importance of adopting change models to stay ahead of the curve better than Netflix. Two of its top executives will share strategies for how to apply this mindset to the field of education at the 30th CFES Brilliant Pathways Global Conference “Leading the Way: The New College and Career Readiness Paradigm.”

2022 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences Awarded to Penn Medicine mRNA Pioneers Drew Weissman and Katalin Karikó

PHILADELPHIA – It was a scientific discovery 16 years ago that paved the way for creation of lifesaving vaccines when the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe in 2020. Now, the two Penn Medicine researchers behind the findings are again being recognized for their innovative and monumental work, which has ushered in a new era of vaccine technology.

Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants

Researchers found that breastfeeding mothers who received either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccination reported the same local or systemic symptoms as what has been previously reported in non-breastfeeding women, with no serious side effects in the breastfed infants.

Returning to School Sports Runs Low Risk for COVID-19 Infection, Say Loyola Medicine Experts

As students head back to school this fall, sports medicine physicians with Loyola Medicine say the risk of COVID-19 exposure among student athletes is low. As the Delta variant of COVID-19 continues to spread across the U.S., Nathaniel Jones, MD, a sports medicine physician for Loyola Medicine, emphasizes the importance of getting vaccinated.

As COVID-19 and Online Misinformation Spread, Children and Teens Were Poisoned with Hand Sanitizer and Alcoholic Drinks

During the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, as false health information spread on social media, the number of children and teens poisoned with hand sanitizer or alcoholic beverages surged in Iran. These poisonings resulted in hundreds of hospitalizations and 22 deaths. Misinformation circulating on social media included the false suggestion that consuming alcohol (methanol) or hand sanitizer (ethanol or isopropyl alcohol) protected against COVID-19 infection (it does not). A major alcohol poisoning outbreak sickened nearly 6,000 Iranian adults, of whom 800 died. It was not known, however, to what extent children and adolescents were affected. For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, investigators compared pediatric hospitalizations for ethanol and methanol poisoning during the early COVID-19 pandemic in Iran with the same period the previous year. They also looked at types of exposure and how those were linked to the children’s ages and clinical outcomes.

“Automated Vaccine Filling Machine”, An Innovation from Chulalongkorn University, Helps Boost the Number of Vaccinations by 20 Percent, and Reduce the Workload of Medical Personnel

The Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University has developed an automated vaccine filling machine that can fill AstraZeneca vaccine into syringes with precision, speed, and safety, helping to increase the number of vaccinated people by 20 percent. The prototype is now operating at Chula Vaccination Center and more machines are planned to be built to support frontline medical personnel in many vaccination centers soon.

New study: Nursing home residents, health care workers lose more than 80% of their COVID-19 immunity six months after Pfizer vaccine

A new, multi-institutional study led by Case Western Reserve University—in partnership with Brown University—found that COVID-19 antibodies produced by the Pfizer vaccine decreased sharply in senior nursing home residents and their caregivers six months after receiving their second shots.

2VIDA! Tackles COVID Vaccine Hesitancy and Barriers in Latinx, Black Communities

UC San Diego is collaborating with San Ysidro Health on an NIH-funded outreach program to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Latinx and African American communities. The team runs pop-up vaccination sites across San Diego, and goes door-to-door to homes and local businesses to spread awareness.

Early COVID-19 shutdowns helped St. Louis area avoid thousands of deaths

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis estimates the number of deaths that could have occurred had public health orders been delayed for one week, two weeks or four weeks as the pandemic was first taking hold in St. Louis city and St. Louis County. The analysis suggests that, in the first three months of the pandemic, the region avoided thousands of hospitalizations and deaths with early and coordinated public health measures.

7th International Conference Lifelong Learning for All 2021: Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the Covid-19 Crisis and Beyond

Timed to coincide with International Literacy Day 2021, the Department of Lifelong Education, Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University, has collaborated with the Faculty of Education’s R&D Center for Lifelong Learning for Active Aging, Research Center for Children and Youth Development (CYD), and DVV International, to organize the 7th International Conference on Lifelong Learning for All 2021 (LLL 2021). For this year, the topic is “Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the COVID-19 Crisis and Beyond”.

Penn mRNA Researchers Drew Weissman and Katalin Karikó Awarded the 2021 Albany Prize

PHILADELPHIA – For their landmark research that set a foundation for the mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, Drew Weissman, MD, PhD, the Roberts Family Professor of Vaccine Research, and Katalin Karikó;, PhD, an adjunct professor of Neurosurgery at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and a senior vice president at BioNTech, have been selected to receive the 2021 Albany Prize.

COVID 19: Learning About Nurses’ Moral Distress During Crisis Care

During the pandemic, nurses continue to deliver a crisis standard of care, which requires allocating and using scarce medical resources. This care, in the context of COVID-19, an infectious and potentially fatal illness, requires nurses to balance their duty to care for patients while protecting themselves and their families. Crisis standards of care cause high moral distress for clinicians. The lack of preparedness of U.S. hospitals to initiate crisis care standards is likely amplifying such distress. Could better leadership communication mitigate this distress and consequential poorer mental health?

How Adolescents Used Drugs During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Among adolescents ages 10 to 14 in the U.S, the overall rate of drug use remained relatively stable in the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, one change was a decreased use of alcohol, but an increased use of nicotine and misuse of prescription drugs.

Surveillance study finds disparities, high proportion of past COVID-19 infections among adults and children in Santa Ana

In a large-scale, population-based surveillance conducted in partnership with the City of Santa Ana, researchers at the University of California, Irvine’s Program in Public Health found 27% positivity of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among participating Santa Ana residents. This unique study was one of the first to examine household transmission of COVID-19 and to include a pediatric population (ages 5+).

Northwestern Kellogg Professor on America’s Failure To Deliver Sufficient Vaccines Worldwide and Why It Will Cost The U.S. Its Global Leadership

MEDIA ALERT – AUGUST 23, 2021  EVANSTON, IL — “While the U.S. is trying to incentivize Americans to get vaccinated, people in developing countries are protesting a lack of access. The U.S. needs to step up its global vaccine sharing, not…

Mount Sinai Researchers Report Troubling Increase in Homebound Older Adults, Especially Blacks and Hispanics, During Pandemic

In a study to be published this coming Monday, August 23, at 11 am Eastern (please note embargo) in JAMA Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai researchers discuss a troubling rise in homebound older adults that underlines the inequality of the pandemic.