Analysis Finds that Digital Picture Books Harm Young Children’s Learning—Unless the Books Have the Right Enhancements

A comprehensive meta-analysis of prior research has found, overall, that children ages 1 to 8 were less likely to understand picture books when they read the digital, versus print, version. However, when digital picture books contain the right enhancements that reinforce the story content, they outperform their print counterparts. The results were published today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

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College and Career Readiness Trainings For Parents Proving Critical to Keeping Children’s Postseondary Dreams Alive

Osiris Dominguez has dedicated her life to helping her four children succeed. She reads the latest information on college and career readiness and how best to support her children’s postsecondary dreams. But she worries about other parents in her small community along the Rio Grande who struggle to find information to help their sons and daughters become the first in their families to attend college.

Last week, the special education aid at San Elizario high in El Paso County, took a virtual College and Career Readiness Advisor Training that she says provided critical information for parents in a new and digestible way. Offered by CFES Brilliant Pathways, a non-profit that has helped over 100,000 students attain college degrees, the training is part of a nationwide effort by CFES to address a 30 percent decrease in college enrollment among students from low-income families.

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Air pollution spikes linked to lower test scores for Salt Lake County third graders

More frequent exposure to air pollution spikes were associated with reduced test scores for third graders in Salt Lake County. Schools with a higher proportion of students of color and from households experiencing poverty were exposed to more peak pollution days than were schools serving middle- to upper- class and predominately white students.

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Game-based learning platform will make education accessible to refugees

There are more than 70 million forcibly displaced refugees worldwide.

A team of Wichita State University researchers is working on making education more accessible to refugee learners.

The Education for All project is creating an interactive, game-based learning platform for K-through-12 students.

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COVID-19 and the Future of Education

The year 2020 hasn’t just been one for the history books: It’s made quite an impact on K-12 grade books as well. As the COVID-19 pandemic drags on into another school year, the school playground has instead become a battleground for adults — teachers, parents, school administrators, public health officials, lawmakers — rowing over the future of education: Should schools reopen? Is remote learning just as effective as in-person classes, and is the technology available to ensure equity for all students? For schools that open, is enough funding available to effectively protect teachers and students from COVID-19? For those that don’t, what about parents’ need to return to work despite the need for at-home teaching? For answers, we turned to Bradley Marianno, a UNLV College of Education professor and expert on teachers’ unions.

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Free ArtPlay workshops for teachers will share tips for virtual teaching Aug. 11, Aug. 17

When musical theater and visual arts summer camps went online at the University of Alabama at Birmingham this summer, staff did not know what to expect. The award-winning camps, presented by UAB’s ArtPlay, are always popular, to the point of selling out all available spaces. Despite the teachers’ fears, campers and their parents loved the new virtual camps.

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CSU Receives Grant to Continue Residency Scholarship for Teachers in High-Need California Schools

​​​The California State University (CSU) received a $500,000 grant to continue its CSU Residency Year Service Scholarship Program. The scholarships will help to lessen student debt for aspiring teachers during these economically challenging times, aiding in the completion of their academic programs and improving new teacher retention. The CSU’s teacher preparation program is the largest in the state and among the largest in the nation, producing more than half of California’s new teachers.

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1/3 of Parents in 3 States May Not Send Children to School Because of COVID-19

Most parents surveyed in three states support measures to reduce COVID-19 exposure risk, including decreasing the number of children on buses, daily temperature screens for students, alternating between in-person and online classes, regular testing of school staff, and requiring school staff and older children to wear masks.

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Caution urged for reopening schools to prevent spread of COVID-19 crisis

Irvine, Calif., June 15, 2020 — With fast-approaching preparations required for a new school year with no consensus plan yet in place, a team of clinicians, scientists and educators – including a University of California, Irvine pediatrician – stress the need for caution when re-opening America’s schools and advocate for large-scale viral testing in children, contract tracing and other actions to avoid compounding the COVID-19 crisis.

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Four things school districts need to know before moving learning online

As the number of cases of COVID-19 multiplies and the duration of school closures increases, school districts are struggling with the feasibility of providing students with online learning opportunities. A new report from Michigan State University’s Quello Center reveals the challenges schools face if they plan to move online.

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Another Unintended Consequence of COVID-19: Cyberbullying Could Increase

School districts nationwide are now providing K-12 education online. Stuck at home all day, students will be using apps even more than they already do, which could cause an increase in cyberbullying among youth. Many cyberbullying targets will hesitate to get help from their parents and will suffer silently because they can’t readily stop by the guidance counselor’s office or chat with a teacher after class. A cyberbullying expert provides important tips and advice for teachers and parents.

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Creating a new normal for kids during the uncertainties of COVID-19

The list of schools canceling classes indefinitely is growing, and day-to-day life has been disrupted like never before – all because of increased social distancing measures to stop the spread of COVID-19. This lack of routine, coupled with the fear of an unknown illness, can be overwhelming for children. A pediatric psychologist with the Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) explains what parents can do to maintain a sense of normalcy for their children during this time.

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CFES Brilliant Pathways Kicks Off Nationwide Effort to Train 5,000 College and Career Advisors to Increase Student Success

Leaders in higher education, business and K-12 education shared the latest research and best practices with 50 individuals from New York and Vermont as part of a national effort by CFES Brilliant Pathways to train 5,000 College and Career Readiness Advisors by 2022.

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