Researchers Show SARS-Cov-2 Infection Affects Energy Stores in the Body, Causing Organ Failure

An international research team, including Jonathan C. Schisler, PhD, in the UNC School of Medicine, has found how SARS-CoV-2 causes widespread “energy outages” throughout major organs, and how these effects contribute to debilitating long COVID symptoms.

Transplanting Muscle Mitochondria among Species May Create Opportunity for New Treatments

Article title: Muscle mitochondrial transplantation can rescue and maintain cellular homeostasis Authors: Debasmita Bhattacharya, Mikhaela B. Slavin, David A. Hood From the authors: “Our study illustrates the feasibility of using mouse skeletal muscle-derived mitochondria for transplantation in intraspecies- and interspecies-specific…

Mitochondrial Changes Linked to High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

A new study provides evidence for the possibility that mitochondrial dysregulation could be a contributing factor in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The study is published in Physiological Genomics. It was chosen as an APSselect article for July.

CHOP Researchers Reveal How NSAIDs Worsen C. difficile Infections

Why do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exacerbate gastrointestinal infections by Clostridioides difficile, the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea worldwide? In a new paper published in Science Advances, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have begun to answer that question, showing that NSAIDs disrupt the mitochondria of cells lining the colon, sensitizing them to damage by pathogenic toxins.

Increasing skeletal muscle mitochondrial efficiency after weight loss as a novel mechanism for lower energy expenditure

Weight regains is a common problem for weight loss individuals. A number of studies have shown that weight loss in overweight people results in a reduction in whole-body energy expenditure. This reduction in energy expenditure is disproportionate across tissues, known as energetic mismatch which primarily originates from lean tissue, thus increasing weight regain risk.

Commonly used antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis B reduce immune cells’ energy production

New UCLA-led research suggests that antiretroviral drugs called TAF and TDF directly reduce energy production by mitochondria, structures inside cells that generate the power that cells use to function. Both drugs led to reduced cellular oxygen consumption rates, a measure of the ability of the mitochondria to produce energy, compared with controls.

High-Tech Imaging Offers New Way to Detect Signs of Early Glaucoma

Mount Sinai study shows flavoprotein fluorescence could serve as new biomarker

Vitamin B5 May Help Weight Loss by Turning on Brown Fat

Pantothenate acid, also known as vitamin B5, stimulated the production of brown fat in both cell cultures and mice, a new study finds. “[B5] has therapeutic potential for treating obesity and type II diabetes,” researchers conclude. The study was chosen as an APSselect article for July.

Protein Deficiency Impairs Muscle Clock, Mitochondrial Function in Muscular Dystrophy

Article title: Dystrophin deficiency disrupts muscle clock expression and mitochondrial quality control in mdx mice Authors: Justin P. Hardee, Marissa K. Caldow, Audrey S.M. Chan, Stuart K. Plenderleith, Jennifer Trieu, Rene Koopman, Gordon S. Lynch From the authors: “These findings suggest that…

University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential

The enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase helps maintain human health by keeping the amount of reactive oxygen molecules in cells under control. Using neutron scattering at ORNL, researchers obtained a complete atomic portrait of the enzyme, revealing key information about its catalytic mechanism.

Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease

In a series of experiments that began with amoebas — single-celled organisms that extend podlike appendages to move around — Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified a genetic pathway that could be activated to help sweep out mucus from the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a widespread lung ailment.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

UCLA scientists develop high-throughput mitochondria transfer device

Scientists from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a simple, high-throughput method for transferring isolated mitochondria and their associated mitochondrial DNA into mammalian cells. This approach enables researchers to tailor a key genetic component of cells, to study and potentially treat debilitating diseases such as cancer, diabetes and metabolic disorders.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease

National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression. The findings, published online April 21 in Cell Reports, suggest that the epigenome could be targeted as a therapeutic strategy to prevent leading causes of vision loss, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Study provides new understanding of mitochondria genome with potential for new avenues of treatment for multiple cancers

A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center furthered understanding about mitochondria, the cell components known as the “powerhouse of the cell.” Knowing more about the genome is crucial given that mitochondria play important roles in tumorigenesis.