Enzyme Could Be Major Driver of Preeclampsia

A new study by UT Southwestern scientists indicates that an enzyme called protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) appears to be a major driver of preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication characterized by the development of high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. The finding, published in Circulation Research, could lead to new treatments for preeclampsia other than premature delivery, which is often the only option.

Rat Model of Preeclampsia Gives new Insight into Immunological Changes during Pregnancy

Article title: Immunological comparison of pregnant Dahl salt-sensitive and Sprague-Dawley rats commonly used to model characteristics of preeclampsia Authors: Erin B. Taylor, Eric M. George, Michael J. Ryan, Michael R. Garrett, Jennifer M. Sasser From the authors: “The current study…

Association between Hypertension and Gut Microbiome Imbalance during Pregnancy May Lead to New Preeclampsia Treatments

Article title: Gestational gut microbial remodeling is impaired in a rat model of preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension Authors: Jeanne A. Ishimwe, Adesanya Akinleye, Ashley C. Johnson, Michael R. Garrett, Jennifer M. Sasser From the authors: “These results reveal an…

Exposure to Vitamin D in the Womb Might Minimize Risk of High Blood Pressure for Children Born to Mothers with Preeclampsia

Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy—but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb.

Pregnancy Complications in Assisted Reproduction Linked to a Specific Process

An experimental study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania links a specific procedure – embryo culture – that is part of the assisted reproduction process (ART) to placental abnormalities, risk for preeclampsia, and abnormal fetal growth. The team, led by Marisa Bartolemei, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, published their findings today in Development.

RNA Molecules in Maternal Blood May Predict Pregnancies at Risk for Preeclampsia

UC San Diego researchers have identified small molecules in the blood of asymptomatic pregnant women that may predict risk for preeclampsia, responsible for a significant proportion of maternal and neonatal deaths, low birth weight and is a primary cause of premature birth.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Global Fisheries Management Study

New Brunswick, N.J. (Jan. 13, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Olaf P. Jensen is available for interviews on new marine fisheries management research to be published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study is the most comprehensive…