Mount Sinai Researchers Develop a Rapid Test to Measure Immunity to COVID-19

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a rapid blood assay that measures the magnitude and duration of someone’s immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This test will allow large-scale monitoring of the population’s immunity and the effectiveness of current vaccines to help design revaccination strategies for vulnerable immunosuppressed individuals, according to a study published in Nature Biotechnology in June.

Penn Medicine Developed CAR T Cell Therapy Wins Third FDA Approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded its approval for a personalized cellular therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, this time for the treatment of adults with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) after two or more lines of systemic therapy. The accelerated approval was granted today to Novartis for the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy Kymriah® (tisagenlecleucel), making it the third indication for the nation’s first personalized cellular therapy for cancer. It remains the only CAR-T cell therapy approved for both adult and pediatric patients.

COVID-19, MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease Share Same Immune Response

COVID-19, MIS-C and KD all share a similar underlying mechanism involving the over-activation of particular inflammatory pathways, UC San Diego study shows. Findings support novel drug targets for MIS-C.

Cleveland Clinic Appoints Ted Ross, Ph.D., as Global Director of Vaccine Development

Ted Ross, Ph.D., has been appointed Global Director of Vaccine Development at Cleveland Clinic.

In this newly created role, he will lead the development of novel vaccine platforms for a variety of infectious diseases, including influenza, HIV and COVID-19. A highly renowned scientist with expertise in virology, vaccines, immunology and microbiology, Dr. Ross’ research focuses on the design of new vaccines and the implementation of new vaccine trials.

Hepatitis A Vaccination Required for Herd Immunity in People Experiencing Homelessness or Who Use Drugs

In the U.S., hepatitis A outbreaks are repeatedly affecting people experiencing homelessness or who use drugs. A 2017-19 Kentucky outbreak primarily among these groups resulted in 501 cases, six deaths. Vaccination efforts likely averted 30 hospitalizations and $490K in costs,…

Mount Sinai Launches the Brain and Body Research Center, Among the First in the U.S.to Focus Solely on How the Brain and Body Interact

Have you ever experienced a stressful time in your life and then caught a cold, or wondered why you feel sad and depressed when you’re sick? It turns out that it’s not all in your head.

Recent research spanning the fields of neuroscience and immunology suggests that when the brain senses a threat in the environment—whether it be physical, psychological, or social—it sends signals via a complex network of peripheral nerves that mobilize the immune system, readying it to protect us from injury.

Rat Model of Preeclampsia Gives new Insight into Immunological Changes during Pregnancy

Article title: Immunological comparison of pregnant Dahl salt-sensitive and Sprague-Dawley rats commonly used to model characteristics of preeclampsia Authors: Erin B. Taylor, Eric M. George, Michael J. Ryan, Michael R. Garrett, Jennifer M. Sasser From the authors: “The current study…

AI Predicts How Patients with Viral Infections, Including COVID-19, Will Fare

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered gene expression patterns associated with pandemic viral infections, providing a map to help define patients’ immune responses, measure disease severity, predict outcomes and test therapies — for current and future pandemics.

LUDWIG CANCER RESEARCH STUDY SHOWS HOW CERTAIN MACROPHAGES DAMPEN ANTI-TUMOR IMMUNITY

A Ludwig Cancer Research study adds to growing evidence that immune cells known as macrophages inhabiting the body cavities that house our vital organs can aid tumor growth by distracting the immune system’s cancer-killing CD8+ T cells.

Reported in the current issue of Cancer Cell and led by Ludwig investigators Taha Merghoub and Jedd Wolchok at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) and Charles Rudin of MSK, the study shows that cavity-resident macrophages express high levels of Tim-4, a receptor for phosphatidylserine (PS), a molecule that they surprisingly found on the surface of highly activated, cytotoxic and proliferative CD8+ T-cells.

Understanding the skin’s defense system

It can be easy to forget that the human skin is an organ. It’s also the largest one and it’s exposed, charged with keeping our inner biology safe from the perils of the outside world.

But Michigan State University’s Sangbum Park is someone who never takes skin or its biological functions for granted. He’s studying skin at the cellular level to better understand it and help us support it when it’s fighting injury, infection or disease.

Will COVID-19 Eventually Become Just a Seasonal Nuisance?

Within the next decade, the novel coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 could become little more than a nuisance, causing no more than common cold-like coughs and sniffles. That possible future is predicted by mathematical models that incorporate lessons learned from the current pandemic on how our body’s immunity changes over time. Scientists at the University of Utah carried out the research, now published in the journal Viruses.

Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, Named 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Award Recipient by the Rutgers School of Public Health

Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, has been named the 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Awardee by the Rutgers School of Public Health. She will serve as the School’s speaker at their 38th graduation ceremony, which will virtually launch on May 14, 2021.

Apes show dramatically different early immune responses compared to monkeys

A new study out of the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques and baboons has found key differences in early gene expression in response to pathogen exposure, highlighting the importance of choosing the right animal model for the right questions.