Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, Named 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Award Recipient by the Rutgers School of Public Health

Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, has been named the 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Awardee by the Rutgers School of Public Health. She will serve as the School’s speaker at their 38th graduation ceremony, which will virtually launch on May 14, 2021.

Read more

Apes show dramatically different early immune responses compared to monkeys

A new study out of the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques and baboons has found key differences in early gene expression in response to pathogen exposure, highlighting the importance of choosing the right animal model for the right questions.

Read more

Though Risk is Minuscule, Infection after COVID-19 Vaccination is Possible

Investigators from UC San Diego and UCLA report COVID-19 infection rates for a cohort of health care workers previously vaccinated for the novel coronavirus. Risk of infection is minuscule, but exists.

Read more

Yale Researchers Identify Tumor Reactive Immune-Cells to help fight against Advanced Melanoma

According to a new study led by Yale Cancer Center and Department of Neurology researchers, a simple blood draw may be the first step in helping to discover tumor reactive immune or T cells to treat advanced melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. The findings were published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Read more

Genetics May Play Role in Determining Immunity to COVID-19

UC San Diego researchers report that individual immune response to SARS-CoV-2 may be limited by a set of variable genes that code for cell surface proteins essential for the adaptive immune system. The finding may help explain why COVID-19 immunity varies by individual.

Read more

Through a $500 Million Partnership with the State of Ohio, JobsOhio and Ohio Development Services Agency, Cleveland Clinic Forms Global Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health

CLEVELAND: As part of the new Cleveland Innovation District announced today by State of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted, JobsOhio and Ohio Development Services Agency, Cleveland Clinic will significantly expand its global commitment to infectious disease research and translational programs to form the Global Center for Pathogen Research & Human Health.

The new Center will position Ohio as an international leader for research into emerging pathogens and virus-related diseases and will serve as a significant economic catalyst in Northeast Ohio. Funding comes through a $500 million investment from the State of Ohio, JobsOhio and Cleveland Clinic.

Read more

New clues on why pregnancy may increase risk of organ transplant rejection

A research study at the University of Chicago has found that in pregnancy, while the T cell response to a fetus becomes tolerant to allow for successful pregnancy, the part of the immune system that produces antibodies (known as the humoral response) becomes sensitized, creating memory B cells that can later contribute to the rejection of a transplanted organ.

Read more

Pre-existing influenza immunity impacts antibody quality following seasonal infection and vaccination

New research by scientists at the University of Chicago suggests a person’s antibody response to influenza viruses is dramatically shaped by their pre-existing immunity, and that the quality of this response differs in individuals who are vaccinated or naturally infected. Their results highlight the importance of receiving the annual flu vaccine to induce the most protective immune response.

Read more

UNLV Immunologist on the Differences Between Two Leading COVID-19 Vaccine Candidates

Millions around the world have waited for news about a COVID-19 vaccine, regarding it as the beginning of the end for the global pandemic and a herald for the eventual return to “normal life.” Recent announcements from pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and Moderna that their respective late-stage vaccine trials have shown a 90% or better effectiveness rate have received international applause, excitement furthered with estimates that doses could be ready as early as December.

Read more

Mount Sinai Researchers Discover How to Boost Efficacy of Vaccine Designed to Prevent Melanoma Recurrence

A vaccine created to prevent the recurrence of the deadly skin cancer melanoma is about twice as effective when patients also receive two components that boost the number and effectiveness of immune system cells called dendritic cells, according to phase 2 clinical trial results published in Nature Cancer in November.

Read more

What We Know: Mount Sinai to Host COVID-19 Research Symposium

The COVID-19 Research Symposium, hosted by the Mount Sinai Clinical Intelligence Center (MSCIC), is a one-day comprehensive review of advances in research by the Mount Sinai Health System to better understand and treat the coronavirus known as COVID-19.

Read more

Mount Sinai Selected to Serve as Capacity Building Center and Center of Excellence as Part of the National Cancer Institute’s New Serological Sciences Network

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will receive more than $7.3 million from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as part of the NCI’s new Serological Sciences Network (SeroNet), one of the largest coordinated national efforts to study immunology and SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Mount Sinai was selected as one of only four Capacity Building Centers and one of eight Centers of Excellence as part of this new network.

Read more

Blocking Immune System Pathway May Stop COVID-19 Infection, Prevent Severe Organ Damage

While the world waits eagerly for a safe and effective vaccine to prevent infections from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers also are focusing on better understanding how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the body in the search for other means of stopping its devastating impact. The key to one possibility — blocking a protein that enables the virus to turn the immune system against healthy cells — has been identified in a recent study by a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers.

Read more

UC San Diego Health Joins International Clinical Trial to Test Coronavirus Vaccine

UC San Diego Health will be a test site for a third, major Phase III clinical trial to assess a vaccine candidate for the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Sponsored by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, the trial will recruit up to 60,000 participants at sites in the United States and worldwide.

Read more

Cancer Research Institute Goes Virtual for Its Immunotherapy Patient Summit Series, Connecting Patients and Caregivers with Leading Experts in Cancer Immunotherapy

Free virtual event October 2-3 connecting cancer patients and caregivers with leading immunotherapy experts and patient advocates treated with immunotherapy

Read more

UC San Diego Joins Second Major National Clinical Trial for Novel Coronavirus

UC San Diego Health will be part of the Phase III national AstraZeneca clinical trial that will recruit up to 30,000 participants at multiple sites across the country to assess the safety and efficacy of a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

Read more

CANCER RESEARCH INSTITUTE AWARDS $30.2 MILLION IN GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS TO SUPPORT BASIC AND CLINICAL RESEARCH IN IMMUNOLOGY AND CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

The Cancer Research Institute (CRI), a U.S. nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and development of powerful immunotherapies for all cancers, awarded more than $30.2 million in research grants and fellowships in the 2020 fiscal year ending June 30, 2020.

Read more

Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

Read more

CHOP Researchers Identify Lab Profiles that Differentiate MIS-C from COVID-19 in Children

Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) report important data that differentiate MIS-C from severe COVID-19 in children and suggest that MIS-C is a post-infectious syndrome related to COVID-19 but distinct from KD. The findings were published today in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Read more

National Clinical Trial Launches, Will Test Promising Vaccine Against Novel Coronavirus

UC San Diego Health and the Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute will be sites for an accelerated national clinical trial to assess the efficacy and immunogenicity of a vaccine intended to protect against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Read more

UofL immunologist discovers biomarker warning of cellular crisis that could cause death in COVID-19 patients

UofL researchers have discovered that one type of immune cells, low-density inflammatory neutrophils, became highly elevated in some COVID-19 patients whose condition became very severe. This elevation signaled a point of clinical crisis and increased likelihood of death within a few days.

Read more

Memorial Sloan Kettering – Hackensack Meridian Health Partnership Announces Funding for Inaugural Immunology Research Collaboration Projects

The Memorial Sloan Kettering – Hackensack Meridian Health Partnership has formed an Immunology Research Collaboration, through which researchers can apply for funding to support innovative investigations to explore the power of the immune system and ways it may be harnessed to fight cancer. Three researchers’ projects were selected in 2020 for funding support.

Read more

In one of America’s rare undergraduate immunology programs, students are ‘preparing for the next pandemic’

UAB’s Undergraduate Immunology Program, one of a handful of immunology majors available in the United States, gives students real lab experience with more than 100 faculty pursuing cutting-edge research.The entire planet, more or less, is fixated on the greatest pandemic in modern memory. Claire Elliott is already preparing for the next one.

Read more

Spinal cord injuries: Scientists probe individual cells to find better treatments

Two top scientists are seeking answers to questions about spinal cord injuries that have long frustrated the development of effective treatments.

Read more

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Read more