UT Southwestern scientists among top 1% of highly cited researchers across the globe

More than 20 UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists are among the 2022 Highly Cited Researchers listed in the top 1% of researchers from across the globe

Andrew Sabin Family Foundation doubles down on commitment to end cancer with $10M gift

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today announced a $10 million gift to the James P. Allison Institute from the Andrew Sabin Family Foundation and Andrew “Andy” Sabin, a senior member of the MD Anderson Cancer Center Board of Visitors (BOV). The gift is the philanthropist’s second multimillion-dollar commitment to MD Anderson in less than 10 years.

Bring “Highly Cited” immunologists to your podcast guests

The 2022 “Highly Cited Researchers” list from Clarivate includes several La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) scientists well versed in lay friendly communication. These experts are ready to share exciting new research with media and podcast outlets. Contact [email protected] to set up an interview and make arrangements for high quality audio capture.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Researchers Develop Promising New Cancer Therapy

Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as Keytruda and Opdivo work by unleashing the immune system’s T cells to attack tumor cells. Their introduction a decade ago marked a major advance in cancer therapy, but only 10% to 30% of treated patients experience long-term improvement. In a paper published online today in The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI), scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine describe findings that could bolster the effectiveness of immune-checkpoint therapy.

Breast Cancer Research Foundation Renews Support for Mount Sinai Research on Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) has renewed its funding to Elisa Port, MD, and Hanna Irie, MD, PhD, to study new therapeutic approaches that target aggressive triple-negative breast cancer. The latest installment of $225,000 brings the total to almost $2 million over the past nine years. It will fund research into the immune microenvironment of triple-negative breast cancer in order to identify new strategies to enhance cancer-fighting immune responses for this aggressive breast cancer, which traditionally has few options for treatment.

Today: ANA2022 Media Roundtable to Spotlight Latest in Neuro Research

As the American Neurological Association’s 147th Annual Meeting wraps up today, October 25, the ANA is holding a Media Roundtable at 11 a.m. U.S. Central for reporters to access the latest developments in neurology and neuroscience.

CYTOVALE REVEALS 10-MINUTE, 510(K) PENDING CYTOVALE SYSTEM AND INTELLISEP TEST FOR SEPSIS AT AACC 2022

Cytovale®, a medical diagnostics company focused on providing rapid and insightful tools to improve early detection of fast-moving and immune-mediated diseases, will reveal its 510(k) pending Cytovale system and 10-minute IntelliSep® sepsis risk stratification test at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) annual meeting, where new data featuring the test will also be shared. The instrument can be seen in the Cytovale booth, no. 5045, in the exhibit hall during Clinical Lab Expo hours. The IntelliSep test was recently named an AACC Disruptive Technology Award Semifinalist and is also being featured in the Disruptive Tech area of the exhibit hall during the meeting.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop a Rapid Test to Measure Immunity to COVID-19

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a rapid blood assay that measures the magnitude and duration of someone’s immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This test will allow large-scale monitoring of the population’s immunity and the effectiveness of current vaccines to help design revaccination strategies for vulnerable immunosuppressed individuals, according to a study published in Nature Biotechnology in June.

Penn Medicine Developed CAR T Cell Therapy Wins Third FDA Approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded its approval for a personalized cellular therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, this time for the treatment of adults with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) after two or more lines of systemic therapy. The accelerated approval was granted today to Novartis for the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy Kymriah® (tisagenlecleucel), making it the third indication for the nation’s first personalized cellular therapy for cancer. It remains the only CAR-T cell therapy approved for both adult and pediatric patients.

COVID-19, MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease Share Same Immune Response

COVID-19, MIS-C and KD all share a similar underlying mechanism involving the over-activation of particular inflammatory pathways, UC San Diego study shows. Findings support novel drug targets for MIS-C.

Cleveland Clinic Appoints Ted Ross, Ph.D., as Global Director of Vaccine Development

Ted Ross, Ph.D., has been appointed Global Director of Vaccine Development at Cleveland Clinic.

In this newly created role, he will lead the development of novel vaccine platforms for a variety of infectious diseases, including influenza, HIV and COVID-19. A highly renowned scientist with expertise in virology, vaccines, immunology and microbiology, Dr. Ross’ research focuses on the design of new vaccines and the implementation of new vaccine trials.

Hepatitis A Vaccination Required for Herd Immunity in People Experiencing Homelessness or Who Use Drugs

In the U.S., hepatitis A outbreaks are repeatedly affecting people experiencing homelessness or who use drugs. A 2017-19 Kentucky outbreak primarily among these groups resulted in 501 cases, six deaths. Vaccination efforts likely averted 30 hospitalizations and $490K in costs,…

Mount Sinai Launches the Brain and Body Research Center, Among the First in the U.S.to Focus Solely on How the Brain and Body Interact

Have you ever experienced a stressful time in your life and then caught a cold, or wondered why you feel sad and depressed when you’re sick? It turns out that it’s not all in your head.

Recent research spanning the fields of neuroscience and immunology suggests that when the brain senses a threat in the environment—whether it be physical, psychological, or social—it sends signals via a complex network of peripheral nerves that mobilize the immune system, readying it to protect us from injury.

Rat Model of Preeclampsia Gives new Insight into Immunological Changes during Pregnancy

Article title: Immunological comparison of pregnant Dahl salt-sensitive and Sprague-Dawley rats commonly used to model characteristics of preeclampsia Authors: Erin B. Taylor, Eric M. George, Michael J. Ryan, Michael R. Garrett, Jennifer M. Sasser From the authors: “The current study…

AI Predicts How Patients with Viral Infections, Including COVID-19, Will Fare

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered gene expression patterns associated with pandemic viral infections, providing a map to help define patients’ immune responses, measure disease severity, predict outcomes and test therapies — for current and future pandemics.