Oral Probiotic Delivers Colitis Treatment Directly to Gut in Multiple Animal Models

Article title: Oral administration of CXCL12-expressing Limosilactobacillus reuteri improves colitis by local immunomodulatory actions in preclinical models Authors: Emelie Öhnstedt, Cristian Doñas, Kristel Parv, Yanhong Pang, Hava Lofton Tomenius, Macarena Carrasco López, Venkata Ram Gannavarapu, Jacqueline Choi, Maria Ovezik, Peter Frank, Margareth…

The Rising Costs of Alcohol-Associated Liver Disease and More in the February Issue of AJG

A modeling study projecting the economic and social burden of alcohol-associated liver disease by 2040 is featured in the February 2024 issue of AJG, just one month after the new ACG Clinical Guideline on Alcohol-Associated Liver Disease

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Linked to Atopic Dermatitis, Penn Medicine Research Finds

Adults with atopic dermatitis (AD) have a 34 percent increased risk of developing new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared with individuals who do not have the skin condition, and children have a 44 percent increased risk, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Digital Therapeutics and Innovations in GI Highlighted in the August Issue of AJG

The August issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology includes several articles on digital therapeutics and innovations in GI, encouraging adoption of emerging GI technologies to advance GI care.

Mount Sinai Study Uncovers Mechanisms of Reactive Oxygen Species in Stem Cell Function and Inflammation Prevention

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies to demonstrate the importance of reactive oxygen species in maintaining stem cell function and preventing inflammation during wound repair, which could provide greater insights into the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to findings published in the journal Gut on October 3.

Smartphone App to Assess Stool Form, Rural-Urban Disparities in Cirrhosis Mortality, Lung Infection Risk in Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis in July Issue of AJG

The July issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology highlights new clinical science including using a smartphone app to assess stool form, rural-urban disparities in cirrhosis mortality, and lung infection risk in severe alcohol-related hepatitis. This issue also includes articles on pediatric IBD, therapy options for Crohn’s disease, a novel endoscopic suturing device, proton pump inhibitors, and more.

Tipsheet: Cedars-Sinai Experts Share Research, Healthcare Innovations at Digestive Disease Week 2022

Cedars-Sinai physicians and scientists will share their latest advancements and research at Digestive Disease Week, known as DDW, an international scientific and clinical meeting featuring the work of physicians and researchers in gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal surgery. DDW will take place May 21-24 in San Diego, California, and is available for virtual attendance.

McMaster scientists pinpoint key trigger of Crohn’s disease

Researchers gleaned their results by analyzing blood and biopsy samples from two groups totalling 18 people with Crohn’s disease, comparing them to a matching number of people from two healthy control groups. A mouse model of IBD was also used. Khan said his study was the first demonstration of the interaction between serotonin, autophagy and gut microbiota in intestinal inflammation. The paper was published by Science Advances today. Sabah Haq, a PhD student who works with Khan, is first author.

New Clinical Advances in Gastroenterology Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 86th Annual Scientific Meeting

Featured science includes increased incidence of pancreatic cancer among young women, quality of life improvements in IBD, colorectal cancer risk from weight loss surgery and medications, and more

Study Finds COVID-19 Vaccines Safe for IBD Patients

Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) do not appear to have increased risk of side effects from the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, according to a recent Cedars-Sinai study published online and upcoming in print in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. In fact, those being treated with advanced immune-modifying therapies may experience them less often than the general population.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Mark Pimentel, MD

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder, affecting 10-15% of the world’s population. Approximately two-thirds of those who suffer from IBS are women. The disease can have mild forms or cause severe debilitation as diarrhea alternates with constipation. Severe cramping and bloating also are common. Because chronic IBS is so debilitating, it often disrupts the daily lives of people with this disorder.

Multi-Population Risk Scores Could Improve Risk Prediction for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Study Finds

New study illustrates how studying diverse populations can help predict patient outcomes and reduce health disparities

Genetic Risk for Fatal Blood Clots Identified in IBD Patients

Blood clots are the biggest cause of death in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ─ ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In a retrospective study recently published in the journal Gastroenterology, Cedars-Sinai investigators found that a combination of rare and common genetic variants in some IBD patients significantly increased their risk of developing clot-causing thromboembolic diseases.

CHOP Genomic Study Reveals Role for Hypothalamus in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Using sophisticated 3D genomic mapping and integrating with public data resulting from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found significant genetic correlations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and stress and depression. The researchers went on to implicate new genes involved in IBD risk that are enriched in both derived hypothalamic neurons, from a part of the brain that has a vital role in controlling stress and depression, and organoids derived from colon cells, a region more commonly studied in the context of IBD.

Resilience-Driven Care for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Leads to Sharp Drops in Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations

A personalized program to increase resilience in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can substantially reduce hospitalizations and emergency room visits, Mount Sinai researchers report. The research is being unveiled on October 27th in a plenary presentation at the annual scientific meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG 2020).

High-fat diet with antibiotic use linked to gut inflammation

UC Davis researchers have found that combining a Western-style high-fat diet with antibiotic use significantly increases the risk of developing pre- inflammatory bowel disease. This combination shuts down the mitochondria in cells of the colon lining, leading to gut inflammation. Mesalazine can help restart the mitochondria and treat pre-IBD condition.

University of Miami Study Finds Dietary Changes May Help People with Ulcerative Colitis

A new study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology led by Maria T. Abreu, M.D., professor of medicine and professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, found that eating diets low in fat and high in fiber may improve the quality of life of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) — even those in remission.

Mount Sinai Researchers Unveil Mechanisms to Prevent Crohn’s Disease and First Study Linking Metals Exposure w/ IBD

In a series of four studies published today in Gastroenterology, a journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, Mount Sinai inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) researchers, describe the identification of predictive tools and a new understanding of environmental factors that trigger IBD.

Case Western Reserve University researchers discover critical link to controlling inflammation in Crohn’s disease

Investigators at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine discovered that blocking interleukin-1α (IL1α), a protein that controls inflammation in the gut, markedly decreases the severity of intestinal inflammation in a mouse model of Crohn’s disease (CD).

Scientists Find Molecular Key to Body Making Healthy T Cells

In a finding that could help lead to new therapies for immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and IBD, scientists report in the Journal of Experimental Medicine identifying a gene and family of proteins critical to the formation of mature and fully functioning T cells in the immune system.