Digital Reporting Tool Aims to Protect Fire Investigators and Boost Public Safety

After a fire, investigators charged with determining the cause of the blaze sometimes stumble on unstable surfaces, breathe in toxins, or face other health and safety risks. But they had no central place to document their exposure to hazards at work, and researchers had no central place to evaluate that data to try to mitigate those risks — until now.

Small Study Shows Promise for Antimalarial Monoclonal Antibody to Prevent Malaria

monoclonal antibody treatment was found to be safe, well tolerated, and effective in protecting against malaria in a small group of healthy volunteers who were exposed to malaria in a challenge study, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

Therapeutic Potential of Bizarre ‘Jumbo’ Viruses Tapped for $10M HHMI Emerging Pathogens Project

UC San Diego and its collaborating partners have been awarded $10 million from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to leverage the biomedical promise of viruses known as bacteriophages as new therapeutic agents in the fight against the rising crisis of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

Department of Energy Announces $9.1 Million for Research on Quantum Information Science and Nuclear Physics

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $9.1 million in funding for 13 projects in Quantum Information Science (QIS) with relevance to nuclear physics. Nuclear physics research seeks to discover, explore, and understand all forms of nuclear matter that can exist in the universe – from the subatomic structure of nucleons, to exploding stars, to the emergence of the quark-gluon plasma seconds after the Big Bang.

Science Advisory: Advocating for Developmental Care for Infants With Complex Congenital Heart Disease

Developmental disorders, disabilities, and delays are common outcomes for infants with complex congenital heart disease. Targeting early factors influencing these conditions after birth and during neonatal hospitalization for cardiac surgery remains a critical need. However, significant gaps remain in understanding the best practices to improve neurodevelopmental and psychosocial outcomes for these infants.

Investigators Closer to Predicting 2 Common Heart Conditions

Two novel research studies from Cedars-Sinai move the needle on predicting two important heart conditions—sudden cardiac arrest, which is often fatal, and increased coronary artery calcium, a marker of coronary artery disease that can lead to a heart attack.

Department of Energy Announces $125 Million for Research to Enable Next-Generation Batteries and Energy Storage

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $125 million for basic research on rechargeable batteries to provide foundational knowledge needed to transform and decarbonize our energy system through the development and adoption of cost-effective and clean energy sources. The national, economic, and environmental security challenges will not be met solely by incremental improvements to existing clean energy technologies but instead will require transformational technologies founded on new fundamental knowledge and capabilities developed through basic scientific research.

UAlbany Researchers Receive New Funding for Suicide Prevention Programming

Researchers in University at Albany’s Center for Behavioral Health Promotion and Applied Research in the School of Education have received funding to undertake a new project aimed at reducing risk for suicide and substance use among students experiencing health disparities. The work aims to hone strategies that could be implemented widely across college campuses.

Vitamin A May Protect Heart from Some Effects of Obesity

Research in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity found greater disruption to genes involved in heart function when coupled with vitamin A deficiency. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for January.

UCI researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries

As lithium-ion batteries have become a ubiquitous part of our lives through their use in consumer electronics, automobiles and electricity storage facilities, researchers have been working to improve their power, efficiency and longevity. As detailed in a paper published today in Nature Materials, scientists at the University of California, Irvine and Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted a detailed examination of high-nickel-content layered cathodes, considered to be components of promise in next-generation batteries.

Events Serve as “Stepping Stones” en Route to Retrieved Memories

Lost your keys again? One way to retrace your steps involves scanning your memory to find them, such as reaching back to the last moment you clearly remember having them—say, as you walked in the door—before skipping ahead to a “phone call” event and then a “watching TV” event, at which point you might recall placing the keys next to the remote.

Argonne Distinguished Fellow Linda Young to receive honorary doctorate

Linda Young, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow in the Chemical Sciences and Engineering division will receive an honorary doctorate from Uppsala University in Sweden on Jan. 27.

UT Southwestern biochemist, molecular biologist to receive HHMI Emerging Pathogens awards

Two of UT Southwestern’s Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers in biochemistry and molecular biology will lead separate teams as part of HHMI’s Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI) targeting infectious diseases that pose a threat to human health.