New form of repetitive magnetic brain stimulation reduces treatment time for bipolar disorder

A potential new treatment for bipolar disorder (BP) that significantly shortens treatment time has emerged, following a randomized clinical trial using accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation (aiTBS). While current theta burst stimulation (TBS) treatments can take between four and six weeks to administer, this new technique reduces treatment to five days.

Cleveland Clinic Launches New Women’s Comprehensive Health and Research Center

Cleveland Clinic has announced the launch of its new Women’s Comprehensive Health and Research Center, an initiative dedicated to helping women during midlife and beyond thrive and easily receive the specialized care they need. The center is focused on four key areas: access, connectivity, education, and research and innovation to empower women to navigate their health journey with confidence and clarity. 

A new path to recovery: Specialized unit looks to take mental health patients out of the emergency room for better care

The EmPATH unit at Overlook Medical Center will put adult behavioral emergency patients into a setting in which they will get the appropriate care more quickly, thereby lessening volumes and wait times in the emergency department, and, ultimately, reducing the need for inpatient hospitalization.

Nationwide Children’s Hospital to Expand Mental and Behavioral Health Research

Nationwide Children’s Hospital has created a new Institute for Mental and Behavioral Health Research, significantly expanding opportunities to seek a better understanding of mental and behavioral health in children and to develop better diagnostics, treatment and preventative strategies.

Psychiatrist Available to Discuss National Suicide Prevention Month

Psychiatrist Liat Jarkon, D.O., director of the Center for Behavioral Health at New York Institute of Technology, is available for interview/comment on this and other mental-health-related topics. Contact [email protected].   In 2021, an estimated 1.7 million suicide attempts took place in the United States. In addition,…

Researchers use Argonne X-rays to find the best antibodies

Antibody therapies are only effective if the antibodies do what we want them to do. This research can help scientists determine if an antibody is likely to stick to something other than the intended target, which should lessen the amount of time wasted with overly sticky antibodies.

Psychologist: Dial 988 during mental health crises

Millions of Americans dial 911 each year to seek help for mental health and substance use emergencies. However, doing so may unnecessarily land them in the emergency room or the criminal justice system.    In recognition of Mental Health Awareness Month, Anu…

UT Dentists partners with community health clinic to provide affordable preventive dental care

Communities in Southwest Houston have something to smile about: UT Dentists, the clinical practice of UTHealth Houston School of Dentistry, is collaborating with HOPE Clinic to bring accessible dental care as an integrated health service line at a brand new Alief clinic location called the HOPE Health and Wellness Center.

A Leader Fighting the Overdose Crisis Urges Standardizing Addiction Medicine Education and Supporting New DEA Requirements

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The National Vital Statistics System, drug-related overdose deaths have been rising over the past two decades in the United States. In 2021, 106,699 drug overdose deaths occurred. Adults aged 65 and over…

New UTHealth Houston school to train behavioral health workers receives approval from UT System, state

The new UTHealth Houston School of Behavioral Health Sciences has been approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and unanimously by The University of Texas System Board of Regents, moving the university closer to establishing a seventh school.

Pandemic shift to telemedicine helped maintain quality of care for depression

The rapid transition from in-person to care to telemedicine visits at the start of the COVID 19 pandemic did not adversely affect the quality of care – and even improved some aspects of care – for patients with major depression in a major integrated health system, according to a new report. The study appears as part of a special “Virtual Visits” supplement to Medical Care, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Hackensack Meridian Health Expands Carrier Clinic Brand To Raritan Bay Medical Center

“The new Carrier Behavioral Health partnership with Raritan Bay Medical Center will advance our network’s commitment to delivering accessible, compassionate quality care for our patients,” said Robert C. Garrett, CEO, Hackensack Meridian Health. “Carrier Clinic has ranked among the top psychiatric and rehab recovery centers in New Jersey and its integration with Raritan Bay will strengthen the delivery of award-winning behavioral healthcare services close to home.”

Youth Suicide Rates Increased During COVID-19 Pandemic, Especially Among Particular Subgroups

In a study published today in Pediatrics, researchers in the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that in the United States, youth suicides increased during COVID-19, with significantly more suicides than expected among males, non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaskan Native youth, and non-Hispanic Black youth.

University of Oregon Picks Prominent Harvard Psychologist to Lead The Ballmer Institute for Children’s Behavioral Health

The University of Oregon is proud to announce Katie McLaughlin, a professor and influential clinical psychologist, has been selected to lead the Portland-based Ballmer Institute for Children’s Behavioral Health.

Mount Sinai First in Region Offering Telehealth Visits for Low-Acuity 911 Ambulance Calls

Unique program keeps patients with less severe conditions out of the Emergency Department, saving them time and money

Homelessness, hospitals and mental health: Study shows impacts and costs

A new study that harnesses a new form of data on hospital patients’ housing status reveals vast differences in diagnoses between patients with and without housing issues who are admitted to hospitals. This includes a sharp divide in care for mental, behavioral and neurodevelopmental conditions.

“The Ripple Effect” New Study Illustrates Vast Influence Children’s Mental Health Concerns have on Workforce Challenges in America

“The Ripple Effect” study from On Our Sleeves found that the mental health of their children remains a concern for the large majority of working parents, with almost half of all parents reporting that in the past year their child’s mental health has been somewhat or extremely disruptive to their ability to work on most days.

On Our Sleeves® Survey Reveals Most Parents Believe Their Children Will Have Mental Health-Related Challenges Going Back to School

Every new school year comes with its own set of emotions – from worry to excitement – for kids. After years of a global pandemic, safety concerns and other stresses of today, we have to prioritize checking in with children to understand what they are thinking and feeling.

Alarming Rising Trends in Suicide by Firearms in Young Americans

Researchers explored suicide trends by firearms in white and black Americans ages 5 to 24 years from 1999 to 2018. From 2008 to 2018, rates of suicide by firearms quadrupled in those ages 5 to 14 years and increased by 50 percent in those ages 15 to 24 years. Suicide deaths by firearms were more prevalent in white than black Americans – a marked contrast with homicide by firearms, which are far more prevalent in black than white Americans.

ADHD Medications Associated with Reduced Risk of Suicidality in Children with Significant Behavioral Symptoms

ADHD medications may lower suicide risk in children with hyperactivity, oppositional defiance and other behavioral disorders, according to new research from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The findings, published today in JAMA Network Open, address a significant knowledge gap in childhood suicide risk and could inform suicide prevention strategies at a time when suicide among children is on the rise.

Researchers Find Association Between Financial Strain Due to COVID-19 and Depression

Researchers have found an independent association between COVID-19-related income loss and financial strain and depression, according to the latest study from the COVID-19 Resilience Project, run by the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Penn Medicine. This association was found in two separate cohorts – one primarily in the United States and one in Israel – and the depressive symptoms worsened over time in participants who were hit financially, above and beyond pandemic-related anxiety. The findings were published today in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

An Epidemic of Community Violence

Project HEAL (“Help, Empower, and Lead”), a hospital-based violence intervention program working in coordination with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center, opened its doors this month with the mission to address community, domestic, and gang-related violence in Monmouth County.

Rutgers Champion of Student Health and Wellness is Retiring

When Melodee Lasky joined Rutgers University 19 years ago, behavioral and mental health services were scattered across the individual colleges with little coordination. Psychiatry and the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program were part of student health, but counseling services were separated and college-affiliated. Lasky, a physician who recognized the connection between physical and emotional wellness, recommended that mental and behavioral health be integrated within the framework of student health. That led to the creation of CAPS – Counseling, Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program & Psychiatric Services – a program that helps about 4,500 students each year.

UNH Research: Over Half of At-Risk Youth Not Receiving Needed Mental Health Services

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that more than 50% of children in high-risk populations in the United States are not receiving behavioral health services that could improve their developmental outcomes when it comes to mental and physical health problems.

Managing Children’s Mental Health during the Pandemic

Mamilda Robinson, a specialty director and clinical instructor of psychiatric-mental health at Rutgers School of Nursing, and Daniela Moscarella, a pediatric clinical instructor at Rutgers School of Nursing and president-elect for the New Jersey Chapter of National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, discuss signs that a child needs behavioral health assistance and how parents can seek clinical help.

Youth with Family History of Suicide Attempts Have Worse Neurocognitive Functioning

Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt.

5 Things You Must Do While You Wait for the COVID-19 Vaccine

Even as vaccinations against COVID-19 are under way, the virus continues to kill thousands of Americans every day, making it more important than ever to stay safe and be ready in case it strikes you or your family. Here’s what you need to do to prevent and prepare for the novel coronavirus.

Rush Receives $3.5 Million in Funding to Address Behavioral Health Disparities in Older Adults

As the Rush Center for Excellence in Aging continues its commitment to improving the health of older adults, others are taking notice. Rush was designated a Center of Excellence Behavioral Health Disparities in Older Adults by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Study Finds Signs of Altruism in People’s COVID-19 Worries, Putting Concerns about Others First

When it comes to worrying about the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study demonstrates that people are more concerned about whether their family members could contract the virus or if they are unknowingly spreading the virus themselves than they are with contracting it. The study, conducted by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, also shows how increased resilience is able to reduce rates of anxiety and depression during the pandemic.

Caregiver-Reported Child Sleep Problems Associated with Impaired Academic and Psychosocial Functioning in Middle Childhood

Whether children have ongoing sleep problems from birth through childhood or do not develop sleep problems until they begin school, a new study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. The findings, which were published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, suggest health care providers should screen children for sleep problems at every age and intervene early when a sleep problem is identified.

Survey Finds American’s Social Media Habits Changing As National Tensions Rise

As national tensions rise, a new national survey of 2,000 people commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms.

Therapy Helps Children with Food Allergies Manage Severe Anxiety

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. This revolutionary clinic, housed within the Food Allergy Center, is the first in the world to bring together psychologists and food allergy experts to treat food allergic children with severe phobia of anaphylaxis.

Study Finds Parent-Led Discussion about Mutual Strengths Benefits Parent-Teen Communication

A primary care-based intervention to promote parent-teen communication led to less distress and increased positive emotions among adolescents, as well as improved communication for many teens, according to a new study by researchers at the Center for Parent and Teen Communication at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, which were published today in The Journal of Pediatrics, highlight the potential impact of engaging parents in the primary care setting to improve parent-teen communication, which could lead to better adolescent health outcomes.

Ohio State Experts Offer Tips For Healthy Transition To Post-COVID-19 Workplace

Experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Nursing say it’s important to take precautions to avoid infection, but also to deal with the stress of transitioning back to their offices or businesses after an extended period of isolation during COVID-19.

Rutgers Expert Available to Speak Behavior Change That will be Necessary to Move Beyond Stay- at- Home Orders

The COVID- 19 pandemic has required that individuals begin and maintain a series of health behaviors in order to protect their health and the health of families and communities. Messaging and interventions related to COVID-19 need to focus both on…