KERRY H. LEVIN, MD SELECTED FOR THE 2021 DISTINGUISHED PHYSICIAN AWARD FROM AANEM

AANEM chooses one member each year who has provided distinguished service over the course of their career as a clinician and/or educator in support of AANEM activities. Kerry H. Levin, MD has been chosen for his commitment as both a clinician and an educator.

FSMB: Spreading COVID-19 Vaccine Misinformation May Put Medical License at Risk

The Federation of State Medical Boards’ Board of Directors released statement in response to a dramatic increase in the dissemination of COVID-19 vaccine misinformation and disinformation by physicians and other health care professionals on social media platforms, online and in the media.

Rutgers Champion of Student Health and Wellness is Retiring

When Melodee Lasky joined Rutgers University 19 years ago, behavioral and mental health services were scattered across the individual colleges with little coordination. Psychiatry and the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program were part of student health, but counseling services were separated and college-affiliated. Lasky, a physician who recognized the connection between physical and emotional wellness, recommended that mental and behavioral health be integrated within the framework of student health. That led to the creation of CAPS – Counseling, Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program & Psychiatric Services – a program that helps about 4,500 students each year.

Ingo Mellinghoff Named Chair of MSK’s Department of Neurology

Neuro-oncologist and renowned physician-scientist Ingo Mellinghoff will lead MSK’s distinguished Department of Neurology after previously serving as Acting Co-Chair.

Proposed Medicare Cuts Threaten Anesthesiology Practices Already Struggling Amid Pandemic

Medicare has proposed drastic cuts to its payment rates for important health care services, threatening the practices of physician anesthesiologists who have been on the front lines of the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) opposes these detrimental payment reductions, and urges Congress to take action to override the budget neutrality requirements that are the cause for these cuts and thereby ensure physician anesthesiologists can continue to care for their patients while being more fairly compensated for their work.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Awards and Appointments

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) announces its most recent awards and appointments for the institution’s physicians, scientists, nurses, and staff.

Uganda’s Ik are not Unbelievably Selfish and Mean

The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity.

Healthcare Leaders Highlight Need to “Raise the Line” of Healthcare Capacity In addition to “Flattening the Curve” of the Spread of COVID-19

While healthcare and government leaders around the world are focused on “flattening the curve” of the spread of COVID-19, an emerging concurrent rallying cry to “raise the line” of healthcare service capacity is being showcased in a new educational video recently released and set for international distribution.

LifeBridge Health, an academic community health system in Baltimore, MD, and Osmosis, an international medical education video platform, released the collaborative video aimed at educating both medical practitioners and the general public on the importance and practical ways to flatten the curve and raise the line of capacity.



PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGIST WHO CO-FOUNDED CAMP FOR CHILDREN RECOGNIZED FOR CARE

The American Academy of Dermatology has honored board-certified dermatologist Karen Wiss, MD, FAAD, as a Patient Care Hero for her role in treating a patient born with an extremely rare skin disease caused by a genetic mutation. The condition, known as recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), is commonly called “the butterfly disease,” because it causes skin to be extremely fragile and blister easily after minor rubbing or scratching. It affects fewer than one in 1 million people.