UCI experts produce guide for defense attorneys fighting use of rap lyrics in trials

Irvine, Calif., June 9, 2021 — Criminology and legal experts at the University of California, Irvine have released Rap on Trial: A Legal Guide for Attorneys, to help protect artists from having their lyrics used against them in court. Rap lyrics have been introduced as evidence in hundreds of cases, and a high-profile ruling by the Maryland Court of Appeals recently allowed a few lines of rap to help put a man behind bars for 50 years.

Demographic differences foster social ties in online support groups, UCI-led study finds

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 22, 2020 — Millions of adults in the U.S. join online support groups to help them attain health goals, ranging from weight loss to smoking cessation. In their quest to make connections, members have a tendency to hide demographic differences, concerned about poor social integration that will weaken interpersonal ties.

UC Berkeley expert available for insights on narcissistic leadership. Like carriers of a virus, narcissistic leaders “infect” the cultures of their organizations, leading to dramatically lower levels of collaboration and integrity.

Biography :Jennifer Chatman is a world-renowned researcher, teacher & consultant on leveraging organizational culture for firm performance and leading high-performance teams. Chatman is the Paul J. Cortese Distinguished Professor of Management and a faculty member in the Management of Organizations…

Cellular processes and social behaviors and… zombies?

The Zombie Apocalypse Medicine Meeting will happen online October 15-18, 2020. The meeting spans the sciences, the arts and the scary while bringing scientists, artists and journalists together with the general public. This year’s meeting has been reanimated into a livestream broadcast on Channel Zed. Registrants will have access to programming on topics like how birth control, race relations, the pandemic, sex, literature and social media can all be thought of as zombification processes.

Uncovering the science of Indigenous fermentation

Australian wine scientists are shedding scientific light on the processes underlying traditional practices of Australian Aboriginal people to produce fermented beverages. The scientists from the University of Adelaide and the Australian Wine Research Institute (AWRI) have discovered the complex microbial communities associated with the natural fermentation of sap from the iconic Tasmanian cider gum, Eucalyptus gunnii. The work has been published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.

Indigenous People Vital for Understanding Environmental Change

Grassroots knowledge from indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research. The study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, shows the importance of indigenous and local knowledge for monitoring ecosystem changes and managing ecosystems. The team collected more than 300 indicators developed by indigenous people to monitor ecosystem change, and most revealed negative trends, such as increased invasive species or changes in the health of wild animals. Such local knowledge influences decisions about where and how to hunt, benefits ecosystem management and is important for scientific monitoring at a global scale.

Uganda’s Ik are not Unbelievably Selfish and Mean

The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity.

Notre Dame experts on coronavirus: limitations of WHO, cultural implications and similarities to polio

Dr. Bernard Nahlen, director of Notre Dame’s Eck Institute for Global Health and Catherine Bolten, associate professor of anthropology and peace studies, provide insight into aspects of how the COVID-19 epidemic has unfolded, as health officials brace for the virus to…

J-Term Speaks to the Culture of University

Nationally, 10 to 11 percent of students study away by the time they graduate college. At Augustana University, that number is 52 percent, with more than 230 students expected to study away this academic year. More than 150 of those students are participating in the study abroad program through Augustana’s four-week January interim — also known as J-Term — while still earning credits.