Advanced practice nurse and philosopher Mark Lazenby named dean of UCI nursing school

Irvine, Calif., July 27, 2021 – Mark Lazenby, advanced practice nurse and philosopher, has been appointed dean of the Sue & Bill Gross School of Nursing at the University of California, Irvine, following a nationwide search. He will assume his new role on Jan. 1, 2022. Lazenby is currently a professor of nursing and associate dean for faculty and student affairs in the School of Nursing at the University of Connecticut, where he’s also an affiliate professor of philosophy.

National Outstanding Researcher of the Year 2021 (Philosophy) and His Research to Solve Social Inequality

According to Assoc. Prof. Dr. Apiwat Ratanawaraha, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Faculty of Architecture, Chulalongkorn University and National Outstanding Researcher of the Year 2021 (Philosophy) “Land use in Thailand has been a chronic problem and the cause of systemic social inequality and injustice. If we are unable to resolve this issue, it is difficult to reduce inequality and injustice in other areas.”

It’s morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine

Rich nations should not engage in “vaccine nationalism” and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

From classroom to kitchen

Like many college students, Jada Taylor was unsure about which major would be best for her – until she found philosophy. Along the way, pursuing a philosophy degree has not only prepared her for her future career but helped her make important life decisions, such as choosing to become vegan and low waste.

Universal right to health could inspire people, organizations to make real change

Acknowledging health as a universal human right could galvanize people and organizations to make major improvements in health worldwide, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Don’t feel bad about purchasing non-essential items during COVID-19 crisis

Consumers should consider the likely economic and health consequence when purchasing non-essential items during the coronavirus pandemic, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. “Many people who can do so are making an…

Businesses need to consider health, financial situation of employees in return to work amidst COVID-10

Employers need to consider the health and economic consequences of asking employees to return to work amidst the COVID-19 outbreak, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun said that employers may…

Looking ahead, the United States has an obligation to help other countries fight the coronavirus

The United States has an obligation to help developing countries who will certainly fare much worse in the COVID-19 pandemic, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York.  “I believe we have a moral…

The U.S. government is failing to uphold its duty to protect citizens during the coronavirus pandemic

By not supplying New York the necessary ventilators it needs to help during the coronavirus outbreak, the government is failing to uphold its social contract with citizens, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New…

Coronavirus crisis: governments, organizations need to get creative to avoid healthcare rationing

Governmental and nongovernmental organizations need to get creative to avoid healthare rationing during the coronavirus crisis, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York and head of the Global Health Impact project. “While transparency is…

New methods for resource allocation needed to meet global health needs

How should states and international organizations allocate global health resources? Nicole Hassoun, associate professor of philsophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York, said that it is important to develop new models for evaluating allocations of health-related resources. Financial resources…

University of Utah researchers publish article posing powerful moral conflict between physician aid-in-dying and suicide prevention

Researchers at the University of Utah have published an article in the October edition of the American Journal of Bioethics posing the powerful moral conflict between physician aid-in-dying and suicide prevention. In the article, Brent Kious, assistant professor of psychiatry, and Margaret Battin, distinguished professor of philosophy, ask the question, if the practice of PAD for terminal illness is permissible, then should it be justifiable for those who suffer from psychiatric illness, since the suffering can be equally severe?