Jacobs Foundation awards UCI $11 million to improve digital technologies for children

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 7, 2021 – In its latest commitment to advancing learning, the Jacobs Foundation has awarded a five-year, nearly $11 million grant to the University of California, Irvine for the creation of a collaborative network to help tailor digital technologies for children. Connecting the EdTech Research EcoSystem will bring together global leaders in computer science, psychology, neuroscience, education and educational technology in pursuit of this goal.

Old Habit-Controlling Neurons May Also Help the Brain Learn New Tricks

In a study of rodents, scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai discovered that a part of the brain traditionally thought to control typing the old habits may also play a critical role in learning the new actions. The results, published on August 25th in Nature Communications, suggest that this process involves a delicate balance in the activity of two neighboring neural circuits: one dedicated to new actions and the other to old habits

Award-Winning Journalist and CDC Principal Investigator to Serve as ACR Convergence 2021 Keynote Speaker

Convergence 2021, the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), returns to a virtual meeting platform Nov. 1 – 10. This year’s meeting will include presentations from over 320 clinicians, researchers and health experts, including this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Seema Yasmin.

Robot Teaching Assistant from Chulalongkorn Wins Two of the World’s Most Prestigious Awards

The learning environment promises to be more fun and energetic with a new robot teaching assistant – a creation by Chula inventors rubber-stamped by the Gold Medal and the Innovation Excellence Award from the International British Innovation, Invention, Technology Exhibition (IBIX) 2020.

Analysis Finds that Digital Picture Books Harm Young Children’s Learning—Unless the Books Have the Right Enhancements

A comprehensive meta-analysis of prior research has found, overall, that children ages 1 to 8 were less likely to understand picture books when they read the digital, versus print, version. However, when digital picture books contain the right enhancements that reinforce the story content, they outperform their print counterparts. The results were published today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

In Response to Stephen Colbert, FAU Professor Says ‘Spice it Up’

A research professor gives a “shout out” to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil’s sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers – the worst being the quadratic equation – an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject.

Study: Including Videos in College Teaching May Improve Student Learning

As higher education institutions worldwide transition to new methods of instruction, including the use of more pre-recorded videos, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many observers are concerned that student learning is suffering as a result. However, a new comprehensive review of research offers some positive news for college students. The authors found that, in many cases, replacing teaching methods with pre-recorded videos leads to small improvements in learning and that supplementing existing content with videos results in strong learning benefits.

AERA and OECD to Hold Policy Forum on Global Teaching InSights Video Study Results

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) will hold an interactive policy forum on “Measuring Teaching at a Global Scale—Policy Perspectives on the Findings from the Global Teaching InSights Video Study” at 9:30-11:00 am EST, Tuesday, November 24.

Investing in the mind: Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa

Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa.

Back to School?

Dr. Terry Adirim provides answers to some of the most frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 and return to school for school-age children. Adirim is a physician executive with senior leadership and executive experience in academic medicine and the federal government. Her expertise includes pandemic planning and response, health care quality improvement and patient safety, and health policy and management.

UCI faculty create curricula for kids worldwide confined by coronavirus

Irvine, Calif., April 22, 2020 – On this Earth Day, the United Nations is announcing the start of a new environmental education program for the world’s 1.5 billion youth who are confined to their homes to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and unable to physically attend school. Earth School – sponsored by the United Nations Environment Programme and TED-Ed and supported by numerous global organizations such as UNESCO, the National Geographic Society and the World Wildlife Fund – will include teaching modules developed and delivered by faculty from three University of California, Irvine schools.

Dr. Wendy Paterson, Dean of the School of Education, is available to talk about a range of matters facing parents and educators during the Coronavirus pandemic.

With New York State schools shut down for the foreseeable future because of the coronavirus pandemic, parents with school-age children are now adding teaching to their list of parental duties. For most parents, this may be an unfamiliar role. Wendy Paterson,…

Moving online in response to coronavirus: Best practices for adapting courses

Binghamton University offers live or pre-taped interviews powered by a state-of-the-art ReadyCam television studio system, available at a moment’s notice. Our system can broadcast live HD audio and video to networks, news agencies, and affiliates interviewing Binghamton faculty, students, and staff.…

UNH Researchers Find Synchronization of Memory Cells Critical For Learning and Forming Memories

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that the neurons involved in Pavlovian learning shift their behavior and become more synchronized when a memory is being formed – a finding that helps better understand memory mechanisms and provides clues for the development of future therapies for memory-related diseases like dementia, autism and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Some Learning is A Whole-Brain Affair, Study Shows

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have successfully used a laser-assisted imaging tool to “see” what happens in brain cells of mice learning to reach out and grab a pellet of food. Their experiments, they say, add to evidence that such motor-based learning can occur in multiple areas of the brain, even ones not typically associated with motor control.

More medical students are telling their schools about their disabilities, and schools are responding, study finds

The percentage of medical students who told their schools that they have a disability rose sharply in recent years, a new study shows. Medical schools made changes, called accommodations, for nearly all medical students who disclosed the fact that they have a condition that qualifies as a disability, the study also finds.

Teens with Autism Can Master Daily Living Skills When Parents Teach, Reach for iPads

Daily tasks can be difficult for some people with autism because they often involve sequential steps. Since people with autism are strong visual learners, a study examined if parents could help their teens learn using portable, mainstream devices like an iPad. Similar studies have primarily targeted parents of young children with autism. Results show that video prompting interventions produced both immediate and lasting effects for teens with autism and that parents can be powerful delivery agents to increase independence in their children.

Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did – with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence.

Moderate to Heavy Drinking During Pregnancy Alters Genes in Newborns, Mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies’ DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.