UNH Researchers Find Synchronization of Memory Cells Critical For Learning and Forming Memories

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that the neurons involved in Pavlovian learning shift their behavior and become more synchronized when a memory is being formed – a finding that helps better understand memory mechanisms and provides clues for the development of future therapies for memory-related diseases like dementia, autism and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Some Learning is A Whole-Brain Affair, Study Shows

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have successfully used a laser-assisted imaging tool to “see” what happens in brain cells of mice learning to reach out and grab a pellet of food. Their experiments, they say, add to evidence that such motor-based learning can occur in multiple areas of the brain, even ones not typically associated with motor control.

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More medical students are telling their schools about their disabilities, and schools are responding, study finds

The percentage of medical students who told their schools that they have a disability rose sharply in recent years, a new study shows. Medical schools made changes, called accommodations, for nearly all medical students who disclosed the fact that they have a condition that qualifies as a disability, the study also finds.

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Teens with Autism Can Master Daily Living Skills When Parents Teach, Reach for iPads

Daily tasks can be difficult for some people with autism because they often involve sequential steps. Since people with autism are strong visual learners, a study examined if parents could help their teens learn using portable, mainstream devices like an iPad. Similar studies have primarily targeted parents of young children with autism. Results show that video prompting interventions produced both immediate and lasting effects for teens with autism and that parents can be powerful delivery agents to increase independence in their children.

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