Unusual visual examination of objects may indicate later autism diagnosis in infants

Unusual visual inspection of objects in infants may precede the development of the social symptoms characteristic of autism syndrome disorder, a UC Davis Health study has found.

Jacobs Foundation awards UCI $11 million to improve digital technologies for children

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 7, 2021 – In its latest commitment to advancing learning, the Jacobs Foundation has awarded a five-year, nearly $11 million grant to the University of California, Irvine for the creation of a collaborative network to help tailor digital technologies for children. Connecting the EdTech Research EcoSystem will bring together global leaders in computer science, psychology, neuroscience, education and educational technology in pursuit of this goal.

How to Play with Your Children in Age-appropriate and Creative Ways When Schools Are Still Closed and Everyone Is Still Stuck at Home

The COVID-19 situation may have restricted people’s space, but not their imagination. A Chula lecturer has given recommendations to parents who need to spend more time at home on select social activities to enhance children’s development in a safe and age-appropriate way.

Language Trade-off? No, Bilingual Children Reliably Acquire English by Age 5

A first-of-its kind study in U.S.-born children from Spanish-speaking families finds that minority language exposure does not threaten the acquisition of English by children in the U.S. and that there is no trade-off between English and Spanish. Rather, children reliably acquire English by age 5, and their total language knowledge is greater to the degree that they also acquire Spanish. Children’s level of English knowledge was independent of their level of Spanish knowledge.

Sugar not so nice for your child’s brain development

New research led by a University of Georgia faculty member in collaboration with a University of Southern California research group has shown in a rodent model that daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during adolescence impairs performance on a learning and memory task during adulthood. The group further showed that changes in the bacteria in the gut may be the key to the sugar-induced memory impairment.

Innovative Parenting Programs Address Inequality in Young Children’s Development

Parent education programs and interventions that begin shortly after the birth of a child have shown to significantly impact parenting behaviors that support social and academic engagement for children growing up in poverty.

Study shows conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children

A study from Arizona State University’s REACH Institute has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment. This worry about being abandoned in response to interparental conflict was associated with future mental health problems in children, especially for children who had strong relationships with their fathers.

Research Organizations Announce Joint Commitment to Advancing Scholarly Study of Racism

The American Educational Research Association (AERA), the Society of Research on Adolescence (SRA), and the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) have announced that they are jointly committing to advancing scholarly inquiry related to racism and its impact on education- and youth development-related settings, processes, and outcomes, and promoting the use and dissemination of this research and its practical application to serve the public good.

Rutgers Study Finds Abnormal Puberty Onset Related to Long-Term Health Outcomes, Including Infertility

Puberty is a critical stage in child development and can be a trying time for both children and parents. For some adolescents, however, a delay or early onset of puberty can have long-term negative effects, including future infertility. A study by principle investigate Sally Radovick, MD, explores these implications.

UCI faculty create curricula for kids worldwide confined by coronavirus

Irvine, Calif., April 22, 2020 – On this Earth Day, the United Nations is announcing the start of a new environmental education program for the world’s 1.5 billion youth who are confined to their homes to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and unable to physically attend school. Earth School – sponsored by the United Nations Environment Programme and TED-Ed and supported by numerous global organizations such as UNESCO, the National Geographic Society and the World Wildlife Fund – will include teaching modules developed and delivered by faculty from three University of California, Irvine schools.

Adolescents’ view of family social standing correlates with mental health, life outcomes

Irvine, Calif., Jan. 6, 2020 — Young people’s view of their family’s social status was more strongly associated with their mental health and readiness for future education and work than how much money, education or occupational prestige their parents have, according to new research led by the University of California, Irvine.

Moderate to Heavy Drinking During Pregnancy Alters Genes in Newborns, Mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies’ DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.