NUS and Stanford researchers uncover a new mindset that predicts success

To succeed in modern life, people need to accomplish challenging tasks effectively. Many successful entrepreneurs, businesspeople, students, athletes and more, tend to be more strategic – and hence, more effective – than others at meeting such challenges. A new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that one important psychological factor behind their success may be a “strategic mindset”.

Robert Delprino, Assistant Dean of Buffalo State’s School of Natural and Social Sciences on Finding Normal in an Abnormal Time

Robert P. Delprino, professor of psychology and assistant dean of the School of Natural and Social Sciences, spoke about the pandemic and how it may affect workers facing the new reality. Delprino is an expert in organizational psychology and the stressors facing first…

FSU expert available to discuss moral decision-making and social distancing

By: Bill Wellock | Published: March 26, 2020 | 2:45 pm | SHARE: In the fight against this new coronavirus, some of the most effective tools are a couch and a television in your own home.Public health officials are asking people to avoid socializing with others to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. That means people often have to make tough decisions about how to respond.

HEALTH CARE, MASS SHOOTINGS, 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAUSING AMERICANS SIGNIFICANT STRESS, NEW STRESS IN AMERICA™ SURVEY FINDS

A year before the 2020 presidential election, Americans report various issues in the news as significant sources of stress, including health care, mass shootings and the upcoming election, according to this year’s Stress in America™ survey by the American Psychological Association (APA). More than half of U.S. adults (56%) identify the 2020 presidential election as a significant stressor, an increase from the 52% of adults who reported the presidential election as a significant source of stress when asked in the months leading up to the 2016 contest.

STATEMENT OF APA PRESIDENT MARKING WORLD POVERTY DAY

Following is the statement of Rosie Phillips Davis, PhD, president of the American Psychological Association, marking World Poverty Day:
“World Poverty Day represents an opportunity for us to examine our biases, move beyond our individual selves and identify the systemic, underlying mechanisms driving income insecurity. Psychological science can help address the structural barriers and cognitive processes that perpetuate poverty and generate solutions.”