Incarceration of Parent is Associated with Worse Access to Health Care for Millions of U.S. Children, New Study Shows

According to a new study, children exposed to parental incarceration had worse access to primary care and more unmet dental and mental health care needs than their peers, even after accounting for income, insurance status, rurality, and other important factors. With the United States having the highest incarceration rate in the world, these barriers currently place more than 5 million children who have experience the incarceration of a parent at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes because of poor access to early health interventions.

ER Visits Among Youth with Suicidal Thoughts Had Already Spiked in Fall 2019

In the fall of 2019 — before the onset of COVID-19 — emergency departments in Illinois experienced a spike in visits from youth ages 5 to 19 with suicidal thoughts or ideas, according to a new study from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. There was an additional surge in these types of visits during the pandemic, the study found.

New Tool Predicts Risk of Hospital Readmission for Children Before Discharge

Readily available electronic health record (EHR) data can be used to reliably identify readmission risk for children of all ages while they are still in the hospital, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago published in the journal JAMA Network Open. The newly developed and validated tool will be key in efforts to reduce hospitalizations within 30 days of discharge, which also should help free up scarce pediatric hospital beds.

Inequality linked to differences in kids’ brain connections

Growing up in a socioeconomically disadvantaged household may have lasting effects on children’s brain development, a large new study suggests. Compared with children from more-advantaged homes and neighborhoods, children from families with fewer resources have different patterns of connections between their brain’s many regions and networks by the time they’re in upper grades of elementary school.
One socioeconomic factor stood out in the study as more important to brain development than others: the number of years of education a child’s parents have.

Youngest Girls Who Get Pregnant Have Highest Risk of Poor Outcomes, Study Finds

Pregnant teens in the U.S. have long been known to face increased health risks and pregnancy complications, but a new study for the first time finds that girls ages 13 or younger who get pregnant face even greater risks. These very young girls are significantly more likely to experience preterm birth, cesarean delivery, and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) compared to older pregnant teens.

Substantial proportion of ethnically diverse children from low-resource backgrounds report long-term COVID-19 complications

A substantial proportion of ethnically diverse children from low-resource backgrounds with severe COVID-19 illness are reporting long-term complications from the virus, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

Needs and Challenges for COVID-19 Boosters and Other Vaccines in the U.S.

FAU researchers and collaborators provide the most updated guidance to health care providers and urge how widespread vaccination with these boosters can now avoid the specter of future and more lethal variants becoming a reality.

Some Younger Kids May Need Screening for Anxiety in Primary Care

Some children aged 7 years and younger may benefit from screening for anxiety in primary care, according to an editorial published in JAMA by John Walkup, MD, Chair of Pritzker Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and colleagues. The authors respond to the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation that children be screened for anxiety at 8-18 years of age.

With Back to School Comes Back to Sleep: Third Annual Student Sleep Health Week to be Held Sept. 12-18

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine is holding the third annual Student Sleep Health Week Sept. 12-18, 2022, to educate students, parents and educators about the importance of sleep for success, well-being and overall health.

JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting | Teleconsultation to Prevent Skin Conditions in Infants

JMIR Publications recently published “Effectiveness of Pediatric Teleconsultation to Prevent Skin Conditions in Infants and Reduce Parenting Stress in Mothers: Randomized Controlled Trial” in JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting which reported that mothers of infants are prone to experiencing parenting stress, which adversely affects mothers’ and children’s well-being. Additionally, studies have reported that atopic dermatitis (AD) among offspring enhances parenting stress, and postnatal maternal psychological problems can increase the risk of AD in children.

Children Who Lack Sleep May Experience Detrimental Impact on Brain and Cognitive Development That Persists Over Time, UM School of Medicine Study Finds

Elementary school-age children who get less than nine hours of sleep per night have significant differences in certain brain regions responsible for memory, intelligence and well-being compared to those who get the recommended nine to 12 hours of sleep per night, according to a new study led by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers.

International Study Identifies Risks for Long COVID in Children

Nearly 6 percent of children who presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with COVID-19 reported symptoms of long COVID 90 days later, according to a study conducted in eight countries and published in JAMA Network Open. Initial hospitalization of 48 or more hours, four or more symptoms at the initial ED visit, and age 14 years or older were associated with long COVID.

Hackensack Meridian Children’s Health Pediatric Neurologist Studying Concussion Recovery in Children

Pediatric neurologist Felicia Gliksman, D.O., MPH, FAAN, director of the Pediatric and Adult Concussion Center at Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital at Hackensack University Medical Center, and vice chair of the Department of Neurology at Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, is serving as principal investigator and investigator for two studies related to recovery from brain injury.

Under 30 Percent of U.S. Kids Have High Scores for Heart Health

Most children and adolescents living in the U.S. have suboptimal scores for cardiovascular health (CVH), according to the first study to use the American Heart Association’s new “Life’s Essential 8” metrics and scoring algorithm for quantifying CVH levels in adults and children. Overall, under 30 percent of 2-19-year-olds had high CVH. The proportion of children with high CVH declined markedly with older age: 56 percent of 2-5-year-old children had high CVH, compared with 33 percent of 6-11-year-olds and 14 percent of 12-19-year-olds.

Doll Houses — A Toy Aimed at Teaching Compassionate Living with People with Disabilities in the Society

A lecturer from the Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University has developed a toy that instills a sense of compassion in children while teaching them to live happily with people with disabilities and the elderly in society.

Firearms Are Leading Cause of Death Among U.S. Youth

Firearms are now the leading cause of death for children and adolescents 0-19 years of age, with a staggering 83 percent increase in youth firearm fatalities over the past decade, according to a commentary published in Lancet Child and Adolescent Health. Nearly two-thirds of youth firearm deaths were from homicides. Strikingly, Black youth had an unprecedented 40 percent increase in firearm fatalities between 2019 to 2020.

Why COVID Vaccines Are Deemed Non-Essential for UK Young Children

Throughout the pandemic the University of Huddersfield’s Department of Pharmacy has been raising awareness on what vaccines are, how they are formulated, and why they’re an important part of the healthcare strategy as well as the progress on further developments in COVID vaccines, so that people can make an educated decision on becoming vaccinated or if choosing for their children.

Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Not Linked to Epilepsy in Children

A new study suggests that antidepressant use by mothers during the first trimester of pregnancy does not increase the chances of epilepsy and seizures in babies. The research is published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Parents’ mental health was worse during pandemic, study finds

While having a child attend a private school or school with above-average instructional quality was associated with better mental health of parents during the COVID-19 pandemic, hybrid school was associated with worse parental mental health, as was working from home, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Study: COVID Tech Took a Toll on Work-from-Home Moms

Research by UNLV communications expert Natalie Pennington finds that texts, video calls burdened the mental health of working moms during pandemic.