Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss the Mental Health Impacts of Social Media on Children

A Rutgers child and adult psychiatrist, Muhammad Zeshan, M.D., is available to discuss the negative impacts of social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter on teenagers. “I’ve seen the negative psychological impacts of social media, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic…

Common anti-seizure medication associated with elevated fracture risk in kids with epilepsy

A study found that one of the two most commonly prescribed anti-seizure medications is associated with a higher risk of fracture for children and teens with epilepsy. This is significant for this population as it comes during a critical period of bone development, a time during which several features coalesce to develop bone strength that peaks in adulthood.

Older Age, Chronic Co-Morbidities Associated with More Severe COVID Disease in Children

The study, “Factors Associated with COVID-19 Disease Severity in U.S. Children,” published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, determined the factors associated with severe disease and poor health outcomes among children presenting to the hospital with COVID. These included older age and chronic co-morbidities such as obesity, diabetes and neurologic conditions, among others.

Revealing the Secrets to Grooming “Young Innovators” for “9 Global Innovation Awards”

Recently bursting into the scene were young innovators from Chulalongkorn Demonstration School who snatched six gold medals and three silver medals from the International Innovation and Invention Competition in the Republic of Poland last June – cementing the trend of human resource development of the future.

As COVID-19 and Online Misinformation Spread, Children and Teens Were Poisoned with Hand Sanitizer and Alcoholic Drinks

During the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, as false health information spread on social media, the number of children and teens poisoned with hand sanitizer or alcoholic beverages surged in Iran. These poisonings resulted in hundreds of hospitalizations and 22 deaths. Misinformation circulating on social media included the false suggestion that consuming alcohol (methanol) or hand sanitizer (ethanol or isopropyl alcohol) protected against COVID-19 infection (it does not). A major alcohol poisoning outbreak sickened nearly 6,000 Iranian adults, of whom 800 died. It was not known, however, to what extent children and adolescents were affected. For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, investigators compared pediatric hospitalizations for ethanol and methanol poisoning during the early COVID-19 pandemic in Iran with the same period the previous year. They also looked at types of exposure and how those were linked to the children’s ages and clinical outcomes.

7th International Conference Lifelong Learning for All 2021: Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the Covid-19 Crisis and Beyond

Timed to coincide with International Literacy Day 2021, the Department of Lifelong Education, Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University, has collaborated with the Faculty of Education’s R&D Center for Lifelong Learning for Active Aging, Research Center for Children and Youth Development (CYD), and DVV International, to organize the 7th International Conference on Lifelong Learning for All 2021 (LLL 2021). For this year, the topic is “Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the COVID-19 Crisis and Beyond”.

A Game Changer: Virtual Reality Reduces Pain and Anxiety in Children

For nearly two decades, Jeffrey I. Gold, PhD, an investigator at The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has been investigating the use of virtual reality (VR) as a technique to help children undergoing painful medical procedures. His research shows that the technology can have powerful effects. VR works so well that Children’s Hospital Los Angeles now offers it routinely for blood draws.

The Mind and Body Connected: Athletes and Mental Health

Achieving peak performance in competitive athletics requires a complex but delicate interplay of skill, physical conditioning, practice, precision, grit and passion. Sometimes, both external and internal factors such as self-doubt, pressure, anxiety and stress can interfere with an athlete’s performance or desire to play.

How to Play with Your Children in Age-appropriate and Creative Ways When Schools Are Still Closed and Everyone Is Still Stuck at Home

The COVID-19 situation may have restricted people’s space, but not their imagination. A Chula lecturer has given recommendations to parents who need to spend more time at home on select social activities to enhance children’s development in a safe and age-appropriate way.

Kids’ sleep: check in before you switch off

The struggle to get your child to go to sleep and stay asleep is something most parents can relate to. Once the bedtime battle is over and the kids have finally nodded off, many parents tune out as well.

But University of South Australia researcher Professor Kurt Lushington is calling for parents to check on their small snoozers before switching off.

New Children’s Surgery Verification Program standards emphasize patient care expectations

CHICAGO (July 13, 2021): The American College of Surgeons (ACS) Children’s Surgery Verification (CSV) program has announced the recent release of the second version of its Optimal Resources for Children’s Surgical Care manual. The updated standards are intended to ensure programs can achieve a high level of continuous quality improvement for children’s surgery patients from when they first enter a hospital setting until they are discharged. An informational session on the new standards will be presented tomorrow at the 2021 ACS Quality and Safety Conference – VIRTUAL.

NIH-funded study shows children recycle brain regions when acquiring new skills

Scientists studied the brain activity of school-aged children during development and found that regions that activated upon seeing limbs (hands, legs, etc.) subsequently activated upon seeing faces or words when the children grew older. The research, by scientists at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, reveals new insights about vision development in the brain and could help inform prevention and treatment strategies for learning disorders. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute and is published in Nature Human Behaviour.

Alarming Rising Trends in Suicide by Firearms in Young Americans

Researchers explored suicide trends by firearms in white and black Americans ages 5 to 24 years from 1999 to 2018. From 2008 to 2018, rates of suicide by firearms quadrupled in those ages 5 to 14 years and increased by 50 percent in those ages 15 to 24 years. Suicide deaths by firearms were more prevalent in white than black Americans – a marked contrast with homicide by firearms, which are far more prevalent in black than white Americans.

How Kids Eat: Five New Insights on Daily Habits and Childhood Obesity

What we eat during childhood can affect the health of individuals—and populations—for years to come. As rates of childhood obesity continue to rise, five studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into the diets of children and teens around the world.

Young Teens Should Only Use Recreational Internet and Video Games One Hour Daily, Rutgers Research Suggests

Middle-school aged children who use the internet, social media or video games recreationally for more than an hour each day during the school week have significantly lower grades and test scores, according to a study from the Center for Gambling Studies at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Top Cancer Centers Call for Urgent Action to Get Cancer-Preventing HPV Vaccination Back on Track

As part of a unanimous effort on the part of the nation’s 71 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center is urging the nation’s physicians, parents and young adults to get cancer-preventing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination back on track.

Children’s sleep and adenotonsillectomy

While a pint-sized snorer may seem adorable, studies shows that children with sleep disordered breathing are likely to show aggressive and hyperactive behaviours during the day. The recommended treatment is an adenotonsillectomy – not only to fix the snore, but also the behaviour. Now, new research from the University of South Australia, shows that while surgery can cure a child’s snoring it doesn’t change their behaviour, despite common misconceptions by parents and doctors alike.

Rutgers Pediatric Infectious Disease Expert Available to Discuss Pfizer’s Vaccine Approved by FDA for Children

Pediatric infectious disease expert David Cennimo is available to discuss the Food and Drug Administration approving Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use on kids ages 12 to 15. “The Pfizer vaccine had a great track record of safety and success since…

LifeBridge Health’s Center for Hope Launches Red Desk Project As Call-to-Action to Prevent Child Homicide

In a powerful call-to-action to prevent child homicides, LifeBridge Health’s Center for Hope created a moving public art display: 111 red school desks on the lawn of Sinai Hospital. Each desk represents a child killed in the City of Baltimore over the past six years. The Red Desk Project is designed to sound the alarm and raise public awareness about the dramatic increase in child homicide in Baltimore City year over year and the effects these homicides have on the entire community, including other children.

Rutgers Engineers Developing Rapid Breathalyzer Test for COVID-19

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 30, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick engineering professors Edward P. DeMauro, German Drazer, Hao Lin and Mehdi Javanmard are available for interviews on their work to develop a new type of fast-acting COVID-19 sensor that detects the presence…

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Can Doctors Predict Which Children with Pneumonia Will Develop Mild or Severe Disease?

Currently, there are no evidence-based rules that help physicians in the Emergency Department (ED) predict if a child with community-acquired pneumonia will have a mild disease course that can be treated at home or a more severe illness that requires hospitalization. A recent study published in the journal Pediatrics found that the predictive accuracy of clinical judgement was generally fair, but clinicians were least accurate when predicting progression to severe disease in children initially classified as having “low to moderate” risk, which accounts for a large portion of children presenting with pneumonia.