Interactive Discussion Boards May Clarify Confusing Concepts in Advanced-level Physiology Courses

Using an online, interactive discussion board helped increase student understanding and engagement in a large enrollment course, according to new research from The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Physiology educator-researchers will present their findings this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wisconsin.

Doll Houses — A Toy Aimed at Teaching Compassionate Living with People with Disabilities in the Society

A lecturer from the Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University has developed a toy that instills a sense of compassion in children while teaching them to live happily with people with disabilities and the elderly in society.

Beyond Zoom: Virtual reality classrooms

Cristina Lopes, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of informatics, sits in a courtyard waiting as her students slowly trickle into class. In front of them is a series of large objects: the topic of today’s lecture. Lopes reaches out and touches a yellow cylinder floating in front of her, and the object is instantly replaced with a complex line of code.

Emily Penner among 5 early-career US researchers named William T. Grant Scholars

Irvine, Calif., May 11, 2021 — Emily Penner, an assistant professor of education at the University of California, Irvine, has been named a William T. Grant Scholar to explore what makes a high school ethnic studies teacher effective. The five-year, $350,000 award supports promising early-career researchers with interests in reducing inequality or improving the use of research evidence.

UCI announces employee, student back-to-campus plans

Irvine, Calif., April 20, 2021 — Taking what it has learned from remote work and learning practices over the past 15 months, the University of California, Irvine will begin instituting back-to-campus plans for employees and students that will include hybrid workplaces and flexible coursework. The transition back to campus will be managed in phases starting July 1, with the university being fully operational in person by Sept.

In Response to Stephen Colbert, FAU Professor Says ‘Spice it Up’

A research professor gives a “shout out” to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil’s sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers – the worst being the quadratic equation – an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject.

AERA and OECD to Hold Policy Forum on Global Teaching InSights Video Study Results

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) will hold an interactive policy forum on “Measuring Teaching at a Global Scale—Policy Perspectives on the Findings from the Global Teaching InSights Video Study” at 9:30-11:00 am EST, Tuesday, November 24.

Parents: Tips to reduce anxiety for kids returning to school

This fall presents a challenge for parents as their kids adjust to a school year unlike any other. Matthew McConn, chair of the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Educational Leadership at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has advice…

Free ArtPlay workshops for teachers will share tips for virtual teaching Aug. 11, Aug. 17

When musical theater and visual arts summer camps went online at the University of Alabama at Birmingham this summer, staff did not know what to expect. The award-winning camps, presented by UAB’s ArtPlay, are always popular, to the point of selling out all available spaces. Despite the teachers’ fears, campers and their parents loved the new virtual camps.

Impacting the Human Condition and the Planet

In our series, The ECS Community Adapts and Advances, Jerry Woodall shares insights from his long career working in industry and academia. An inventor and scientist, Jerry is best known for developing the first commercially-viable red LEDs used in automobile brake lights and traffic lights, CD/DVD players, TV remote controls, and computer networks. He received the US National Medal of Technology and Innovation for “his pioneering role in the research and development of compound semiconductor materials and devices.” Currently Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), Jerry served as ECS President from 1990-1991. ECS awarded Jerry the Electronics Division Award (1980), Solid State Science and Technology Award (1985), Edward Goodrich Acheson Award (1998), and named him a Fellow of The Electrochemical Society (1992).

Asymptomatic Testing Central to UC San Diego’s Return to Learn for Fall Quarter

The University of California San Diego today announced the next step in its Return to Learn program, which will guide an incremental repopulation of the campus while offering broad, asymptomatic testing for faculty, staff and students on a recurring basis to detect the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

UCI faculty create curricula for kids worldwide confined by coronavirus

Irvine, Calif., April 22, 2020 – On this Earth Day, the United Nations is announcing the start of a new environmental education program for the world’s 1.5 billion youth who are confined to their homes to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and unable to physically attend school. Earth School – sponsored by the United Nations Environment Programme and TED-Ed and supported by numerous global organizations such as UNESCO, the National Geographic Society and the World Wildlife Fund – will include teaching modules developed and delivered by faculty from three University of California, Irvine schools.

Dr. Wendy Paterson, Dean of the School of Education, is available to talk about a range of matters facing parents and educators during the Coronavirus pandemic.

With New York State schools shut down for the foreseeable future because of the coronavirus pandemic, parents with school-age children are now adding teaching to their list of parental duties. For most parents, this may be an unfamiliar role. Wendy Paterson,…

Moving online in response to coronavirus: Best practices for adapting courses

Binghamton University offers live or pre-taped interviews powered by a state-of-the-art ReadyCam television studio system, available at a moment’s notice. Our system can broadcast live HD audio and video to networks, news agencies, and affiliates interviewing Binghamton faculty, students, and staff.…

IU sociologist available to comment on how school closures, e-learning disproportionately impact low-income students

With more than 10,600 of the nation’s public and private schools temporarily closing in response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), low-income students are disproportionally impacted. Many families rely on schools to provide child care and meals while the adults are…

‘HOW I FELL FOR MY FIELD’

As the adage goes, “Choose a job you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” The CSU is lucky to be replete with faculty and staff across its 23 campuses who’ve found their true calling. And for those who work with them—whether students or colleagues—that dedication to education is infectious.
Read on to hear how faculty and staff at nine CSU campuses fell head over heels for their discipline.

UCI’s Oladele Ogunseitan joins executive team of USAID-funded global health project

A University of California, Irvine public health professor hailed for his international research achievements is part of an $85 million effort to detect and respond to the threat of infectious diseases on a global scale. UC Presidential Chair Oladele “Dele” Ogunseitan has joined the executive team of the One Health Workforce – Next Generation project, which is based at UC Davis’ One Health Institute and supported by the U.

To Learn English, Bilingual Children Need Robust Vocabulary from Parents and Caregivers

A study examining parents’ vocabulary and grammar as an influence on children’s acquisition of English, shows that the quality of child-directed speech depends on the speaker’s language proficiency. Children who hear a rich vocabulary acquire a rich vocabulary and children who hear a rich vocabulary in full sentences acquire the ability to put their words together in full sentences. Findings have broad implications for immigrant parents’ language choices at home and for staffing practices in early care and education centers.