Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How Exercise Behaviors Changed During COVID-19 Pandemic

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 14, 2021) – Rutgers expert Brandon L. Alderman, who focuses on the science of exercise and

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Study shows that while there is a link between maternal antidepressant use during pregnancy and affective disorders in the child later in life, the link also exists between paternal antidepressant use during pregnancy and child mental health; data su

Major depressive disorder is highly prevalent, with one in five people experiencing an episode at some point in their life, and is almost twice as common in women than in men.

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New test to study language development in youth with Down syndrome

A team led by UC Davis Health researchers tested and validated elaborated language sampling (ELS) as a set of procedures for collecting, measuring and analyzing the spoken language of youth with Down syndrome in a naturalistic setting. They found that ELS is a reliable and feasible tool that can be used to detect meaningful changes in communication skills of individuals with Down syndrome.

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Young People and Those Without a High School Degree More Likely to Suffer Untreated Mental Health Disorders

People between ages 18 and 29 and those without a high school degree are more likely to experience anxiety or depression during the pandemic and also are least likely to seek mental health treatment, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that surveyed nearly 800,000 households from August 2020 to February 2021.

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Training in compassion improves the well-being of relatives to people with mental illness

If relatives of people with mental illness become better at accepting the difficult emotions and life events they experience — which is what training in compassion is about — their anxiety, depression and stress is reduced

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Women had “alarmingly high rates” of mental health problems during start of the pandemic

A study at the University of Chicago Medicine found U.S. women experienced increased incidence of health-related socioeconomic risks (HRSRs), such as food insecurity and interpersonal violence, early in the COVID-19 pandemic. This was associated with “alarmingly high rates” of mental health problems, including depression and anxiety.

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Middle schoolers with elevated levels of mental health problems pre-pandemic showed reduction in symptoms during the early stages of the pandemic

A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that middle schoolers from a predominantly Latinx community, with elevated levels of mental health problems, showed a reduction in symptoms during the early stages of the pandemic.

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Mental health support at boarding schools helps male – but not female – students feel emotionally safe from bullying

Bullying at boarding schools has a negative impact on students’ emotional health, but for male students, having a school staff member to rely on for support may mute the harmful effects of bullying, according to a new University at Buffalo study. Support networks did not have the same effect for female students, the researchers say.

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Building a picture of fathers in the family justice system in England

The invisibility of dads who lose access to their children because of concerns about child neglect or their ability to provide safe care comes under the spotlight in new research. A research partnership between the University of East Anglia and Lancaster

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