Virtual Village Treats HIV-associated Loneliness in Novel UC San Diego Health Trial

A new trial by UC San Diego Health infectious disease specialist Maile Young Karris, MD, will use longitudinal questionnaires and qualitative interviews to assess the impact of living in an interconnected virtual village on the loneliness known to afflict older people with HIV.

Community Health Center Honored for Services Assisting Minority Women

Florida Atlantic University and Northwest Community Health Alliance’s Community Health Center, operated by FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, together with the West Palm Beach YWCA, recently received the “2021 Community Collaborators Award” from Nonprofits First, Inc., for their untiring efforts to mitigate health care disparities among women from minority groups with limited access to quality care.

A New Test Could Improve Access to Mental Health Support for Healthcare Professionals Who Are Burned Out From the COVID-19 Pandemic

Research presented today at the 2021 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo shows that a new test could identify healthcare professionals who are experiencing high levels of work-related stress and anxiety. As COVID-19 cases surge again, this test could play a critical role in helping healthcare professionals on the frontlines of the pandemic to get essential mental health support.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss the Mental Health Impacts of Social Media on Children

A Rutgers child and adult psychiatrist, Muhammad Zeshan, M.D., is available to discuss the negative impacts of social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter on teenagers. “I’ve seen the negative psychological impacts of social media, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic…

Gun Violence Exposure Associated with Higher Rates of Mental Health-Related ED Visits by Children

Exposure to neighborhood gun violence is associated with increased odds of mental health-related pediatric Emergency Department (ED) visits among children living within four to five blocks of a shooting, according to research by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, published today in JAMA Pediatrics.

New UNLV Program Training Next Generation of Occupational Therapists

UNLV’s new intensive and innovative three-year doctoral program in occupational therapy, housed in the School of Integrated Health Sciences, is training students to meet the needs of Nevada patients — from babies in the NICU to those recovering from accidents and strokes — reclaim their lives.

Paper reviews gut microbiome (bacterial and fungal communities) health for fighting depression during COVID-19 pandemic

In their paper, published Aug. 24 in the Frontiers of Nutrition, Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum and colleagues from CWRU, UH Cleveland Medical Center, BIOHM Health, and Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, examined current literature about the microbiome and gut-brain axis to advance a potential complementary approach to address depression and depressive disorders that have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Coping in College? Female Students Much More Stressed Than Their Male Counterparts

Researchers measured both the psychological perception of stress and evaluated how undergraduate males and females cope with stress. The differences are vast. Females experienced much higher levels of stress than males and used emotion-focused approaches to cope more than males. Females used self-distractions, emotional support and venting as coping strategies. Male students on the other hand sought much lower levels of support, since they either may lack the social network or may not have developed those skills.

Young women unite in world first study to improve mental wellbeing

Worry, anxiety and depression – when mental health problems strike, they hit hard, particularly in times of uncertainty. With young women consistently and disproportionately more affected by mental health problems compared to young men, experts say it highlights widespread gender inequalities, gendered violence, and discrimination.

The Mind and Body Connected: Athletes and Mental Health

Achieving peak performance in competitive athletics requires a complex but delicate interplay of skill, physical conditioning, practice, precision, grit and passion. Sometimes, both external and internal factors such as self-doubt, pressure, anxiety and stress can interfere with an athlete’s performance or desire to play.

Study Finds Improvement for Those Receiving Medication for Opioid Use Disorder With Contingency Management Used

A systematic review and meta-analysis found that using contingency management (CM) at end-of-treatment improved outcomes on six common clinical problems during medication for OUD (MOUD): psychomotor stimulant use, polysubstance use, illicit-opioid use, cigarette smoking, therapy attendance, and medication adherence.

UCLA Investigators Approved for Study on Youth Suicide Prevention

A research team from the UCLA Youth Stress and Mood Program at UCLA’s Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior has been approved to lead a $13 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to compare two evidence-based interventions for reducing suicide attempts and improving patient outcomes for youth presenting to emergency departments.

JNCCN Study Highlights Gaps in Patient Supportive Services at U.S. Cancer Centers

New research in the July 2021 issue of JNCCN indicates a need to increase substance use and mental health support capabilities at cancer centers across the United States. Researchers found 85.4% of centers offered mental health services but only 45.5% had chemical dependency services.

Don’t Let the Raging Virus Put Life in Jeopardy. Chula Recommends How to Build an Immunity for Your Heart Against Stress and Depression

Cumulative stress, denial, and chronic depression are the byproducts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Center for Psychological Wellness, Chulalongkorn University recommends ways to cope by harnessing positive energy from our heart.

65+ and Lonely? Don’t Talk to Your Doctor About Another Prescription

Lonely, older adults are nearly twice as likely to use opioids to ease pain and two-and-a-half times more likely to use sedatives and anti-anxiety medications, putting themselves at risk for drug dependency, impaired attention, falls and other accidents, and further cognitive impairment, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

Healing trauma: Research links PTSD, emotion regulation and quality of life

Research from Binghamton University, State University of New York provides insight into the impact PTSD has on emotional regulation and quality of life, and points to ways to improve both.

Four themes identified as contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania

Hershey, Pa. — Financial instability, lack of infrastructure, a deteriorating sense of community and family fragmentation are key contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania communities, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Highmark Health researchers. The researchers conducted…

Study points to remotely supervised exercise classes as best option during lockdown

Based on data for 344 volunteers, Brazilian researchers compared the physical and mental health benefits of workouts led in person by a fitness instructor, unsupervised online sessions, and classes supervised remotely via video call