Grad Students Researching Methods to Strengthen Mental Health Training in Rural Schools

Third-year graduate students at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC), Ashley Coburn and Breanna King are on their way to becoming licensed psychologists. Before they earn a Ph.D. from the School of Psychology program, they’re taking a deeper look into a topic affecting youth across the country, especially those living in the rural mountain west – mental health.

Homelessness, hospitals and mental health: Study shows impacts and costs

A new study that harnesses a new form of data on hospital patients’ housing status reveals vast differences in diagnoses between patients with and without housing issues who are admitted to hospitals. This includes a sharp divide in care for mental, behavioral and neurodevelopmental conditions.

Feeling poorer than your friends in early adolescence is associated with worse mental health, study finds

Young people who believe they come from poorer backgrounds than their friends are more likely to have lower self-esteem and be victims of bullying than those who feel financially equal to the rest of their peer group, according to a new study from psychologists at the University of Cambridge.

“The Ripple Effect” New Study Illustrates Vast Influence Children’s Mental Health Concerns have on Workforce Challenges in America

“The Ripple Effect” study from On Our Sleeves found that the mental health of their children remains a concern for the large majority of working parents, with almost half of all parents reporting that in the past year their child’s mental health has been somewhat or extremely disruptive to their ability to work on most days.

FAU Nurse-led Mobile Health Unit Will Bring ‘CARE’ Where It’s Needed Most

FAU researchers from the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing have received a four year, $3.9 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a nurse-led mobile health unit to create healthier populations in rural and medically underserved regions.

In stressful jobs, depression risk rises with hours worked, study in new doctors finds

The more hours someone works each week in a stressful job, the more their risk of depression rises, a study in new doctors finds. Working 90 or more hours a week was associated with changes in depression symptom scores three times larger than the change in depression symptoms among those working 40 to 45 hours a week. And a higher percentage of those who worked a large number of hours had scores high enough to qualify for a diagnosis of moderate to severe depression

Pandemic Escalated Teen Cyberbullying – Asian Americans Targeted Most

A study of U.S. middle and high school students shows that about 17 percent were cyberbullied in 2016 and 2019, but that proportion rose to 23 percent in 2021. Notably, 19 percent of Asian American youth said they had been cyberbullied, and about 1 in 4 (23.5 percent) indicated they were victimized online because of their race/color. Asian American youth were the only racial group where the majority (59 percent) reported more cyberbullying since the start of the COVID‐19 pandemic. In 2019, Asian American youth were the least likely to have experienced cyberbullying.

On World Mental Health Day, NCCN Announces Free Updated Distress Screening Tool, Available in More Than 70 Languages

On World Mental Health Day, NCCN announced an updated NCCN Distress Thermometer, is available in more than 70 languages, to help people around the world identify and address psychosocial stressors that may raise challenges when coping with having cancer, its symptoms, or treatment.

Social support promotes rehab participation in mice after spinal cord injury

A research finding in mice that gabapentin improved rehab compliance after spinal cord injury led scientists to a related, unexpected discovery: Injured mice that didn’t receive the drug and declined to exercise by themselves were willing to hop on the treadmill for a group rehab option.

Motherhood at work: exploring maternal mental health

Up to 1 in 5 women in the postpartum period will experience a mental health disorder like postpartum depression or generalized anxiety disorder. How an organization handles a mother’s return to work can have a significant impact on her mental health, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

Lifestyle medicine interventions help pediatricians manage adolescent depression

With rising prevalence of depression in adolescents, screening requirements are increasingly falling on pediatric primary care providers, who are encountering more at-risk patients. A new literature review in Harvard Review of Psychiatry underscores the evidence that non-traditional, so-called lifestyle interventions can help providers meet the growing need for youth depression management. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Women’s mental well-being more sensitive to exercise than men’s during different stages of pandemic

Women’s mental health was more likely to be affected by physical exercise frequency during the COVID-19 pandemic than men’s, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

More Stress, Fewer Coping Resources for Latina Mothers Post-Trump

The sociopolitical climate in the United States has taken its toll on the mental health of Latina mothers, according to new research from the University of California San Diego. Findings show increased depression, anxiety and perceived stress in a border city and reduced coping resources in both a border and interior US city.

Hurricane Harvey’s hardest hit survivors five times as likely to experience anxiety from COVID-19 pandemic

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame with collaborators at Rice University and the Environmental Defense Fund, deployed new surveys to assess the economic and health impacts of the pandemic nationally, but with a special focus on those hit by back-to-back climate disasters.

Supporting farmers through tough times earns UniSA double national accolade

Drought, fires, floods, and now potential disease – in the past few years Aussie farmers have been hit hard from all sides. But amid the turmoil, many farmers have engaged the support of ifarmwell – an online resource that provides free support to help farmers cope with stress and uncertainty of life on the land.

Chief medical officer of US Open available re: Serena’s retirement, player longevity & how elite players can ensure physical/emotional/mental fitness

With Serena Williams’ upcoming retirement from tennis following the US Open, the Chief Medical Officer of the US Open, Dr. Alexis Colvin – who is also an orthopedic sports medicine surgeon at Mount Sinai Health System – is available for…

UAlbany-led study finds exposure to sun, heat and humidity can exacerbate symptoms of mental disorders

New research links information on New York weather and hospital emergency department visits to assess how summer weather conditions impact people living with mental disorders. Findings can inform strategies to mitigate severe symptoms and improve patient care.

‘Church is a safe space,’ suggests WVU study on faith community nurses and mental health

A new study from Veronica Gallo, a researcher with West Virginia University’s School of Nursing, highlights how faith community nurses can be key to addressing the mental health needs of people who attend churches, mosques, synagogues and other houses of worship. Her findings appear in the Journal of Christian Nursing.

Feeling Anxious or Blue? Ultra-processed Foods May be to Blame

A study measuring mild depression, number of mental unhealthy days and number of anxious days in 10,359 adults 18 and older found those who consumed the most ultra-processed foods as compared with those who consumed the least amount had statistically significant increases in the adverse mental health symptoms of mild depression, “mentally unhealthy days” and “anxious days.” They also had significantly lower rates of reporting zero “mentally unhealthy days” and zero “anxious days.” Findings are generalizable to the entire U.S. as well as other Western countries with similar ultra-processed food intakes.

University Hospitals Studying a Self-Management Treatment for Black Women with Depression and at Risk for High Blood Pressure

Researchers at University Hospitals, with support from an American Heart Association® grant, will work to better understand how to successfully treat Black women diagnosed with depression who are also at risk for high blood pressure.

UCI study examines distorted time perception during pandemic

The passage of time was altered for many people during the COVID-19 pandemic, ranging from difficulty in keeping track of days of the week to feeling that the hours themselves rushed by or slowed down. In prior work, these distortions have been associated with persistent negative mental outcomes such as depression and anxiety following trauma, making them an important risk factor to target with early interventions, according to a study by University of California, Irvine researchers.

Having a partner more important than children to staving off loneliness during pandemic, new study finds

A new study released in the European Journal of Ageing found that having a partner had a greater impact than having children in helping to stave off loneliness among older adults during the pandemic’s first wave. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island, University of Florence, University of Maryland Baltimore County and the SGH Warsaw School of Economics analyzed data on more than 35,000 adults aged 50 and older from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to examine if unpartnered and childless older adults reported more loneliness and how that changed over the course of the pandemic.

Study from “Black Tuesday” bushfires finds link to PTSD

New research published in the Australian Journal of Rural Health has shown people who are forced to relocate after a bushfire are at a higher risk of suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, otherwise known as PTSD. Led by Associate Professor Venkatesan Thiruvenkatarajan from the University of Adelaide, and Dr Richard Watts from Flinders University, the researchers spoke with people affected by the 2005 “Black Tuesday” Eyre Peninsula bushfires, which took nine lives, destroyed 93 homes and blackened 80,000 hectares of land near Port Lincoln on 11 January, 2005.

How not to use brain scans in neuroscience

The idea that a lone snapshot of a brain can tell you about an individual’s personality or mental health has been the basis of decades of neuroscience studies. That approach was punctured by a paper in Nature earlier this year showing that scientists have massively underestimated how large such studies must be to produce reliable findings. At the center of the research is MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) brain scans. Reaching that conclusion required getting a far broader view of the field than was possible until recently. Along with colleagues at a number of institutions as well as his advisor, Pitt Professor of Psychiatry Beatriz Luna, Tervo-Clemmens combined three recent publicly available studies that together included MRI data from around 50,000 participants.

Mental health challenges contributed to weight gain for people with obesity during COVID-19

Over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, almost 30% of patients with obesity gained more than 5% of their body weight, and 1 in 7 gained more than 10%. While diet and exercise habits were factors, people with the highest levels of stress, anxiety, and depression reported the most weight gain, UT Southwestern researchers reported in the journal Obesity.

Greater Empathy in Adolescents Helps Prevent Bias-based Cyberbullying

Little is known about cyberbullying and empathy, especially as it relates harming or abusing others because of race or religion. A study is the first to examine general cyberbullying, race-based cyberbullying, and religion-based cyberbullying in young adolescents. Results show that the higher a youth scored on empathy, the lower the likelihood that they cyberbullied others. When it came to bias-based cyberbullying, higher levels of total empathy were associated with lower odds of cyberbullying others based on their race or religion.