Muscle Protein That Makes Vertebrates More Fit Linked to Limited Lifespan

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How Exercise Behaviors Changed During COVID-19 Pandemic

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 14, 2021) – Rutgers expert Brandon L. Alderman, who focuses on the science of exercise and its impact on mental health and cognitive function, is available for interviews on how exercise behaviors have changed during the…

ACSM and Technogym Partner to Promote Physical Activity, Improve Quality of Life

ACSM and Technogym renew long-standing partnership to promote the importance of physical activity and combat chronic disease and illness. The agreement focuses on expanding impact of global Exercise is Medicine initiative.

Black Females More Likely Than Black Males to Exercise, Eat Healthy When Faced with Perceived Discrimination

Black men and women, as well as adolescent boys and girls, may react differently to perceived racial discrimination, with Black women and girls engaging in more exercise and better eating habits than Black men and boys when faced with discrimination, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Exercise caution after working out in virtual reality

Virtual ‘exergaming’ has become a popular way to exercise – especially among younger people – since the release of virtual reality (VR) fitness games on consoles such as Nintendo and Playstation.

But while VR is undoubtedly raising fitness games to a whole new level, researchers at the University of South Australia are cautioning players about the potential side effects of VR, particularly in the first hour after playing.

American College of Sports Medicine to Reveal Top Fitness Trends for 2021

MEDIA ADVISORY WHAT: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every person and every industry this year. It forced fitness facilities to close and disrupted interactions with clients, causing significant economic impact for the health and fitness industry. It also accelerated health and…

Exercise can slow or prevent vision loss, study finds

Exercise can slow or prevent the development of macular degeneration and may benefit other common causes of vision loss, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, new research suggests.

Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries, researchers find

Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).

#FitForTheFrontLine Challenge Unites Nation’s Top Medical Centers in Support of Front-Line Health Care Workers

Fitness challenge honors and supports health care heroes at Mount Sinai Health System and Academic Centers Across the Country. Goldman Sachs & Co., Peloton, Discovery, NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations, dtx and Pinterest Support First-Ever Collective Medical Center Campaign.

Increased focus on fitness during COVID-19 pandemic due to need for emotional security

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has closed most gyms throughout the country, this isn’t stopping people from working out. Many people have used their spare time during quarantine to get fit, but this may be due to their desire for emotional…

Household items, inexpensive workout gear are good alternatives to gym equipment during social distancing

Due to social distancing measures put in place to flatten the curve in the COVID-19 pandemic, gyms around the world are closed. But you can still get a great full-body workout using household items and/or inexpensive workout equipment, says Jenna…

Social media challenges, apps can help you stay fit during social distancing

Social distancing measures have made it difficult for those who normally go to the gym to maintain a workout regimen. Jenna Moore, assistant director of fitness and wellness for Campus Recreational Services at Binghamton University, State University of New York…

Poor fitness may impede long-term success in weight loss program

People who are very out of shape when they begin a behavioral weight loss program lose less weight in the long term than those who are more fit, suggests a new study that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

How to Stay Active and Eat Healthy During Coronavirus Pandemic

As local, state, and federal public health officials continue to urge social distancing as the best way to stay safe from the coronavirus pandemic, Americans across the country are hunkering down in their homes and finding ways to adjust to…

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Physical Activity and Health During COVID-19 Crisis

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 18, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Brandon L. Alderman is available for interviews on how to stay active when gyms are closed and you’re confined to home during the COVID-19 crisis. Alderman can also discuss…

Tips for managing stress during the coronavirus crisis

The following are tips for managing stress during the coronavirus crisis from Jennifer Wegmann from the Health and Wellness Studies Department at Binghamton University, State University of New York. In what seems like a blink of an eye, the coronavirus…

Expert Alert: Keep exercising: New study finds it’s good for your brain’s gray matter

A study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases provides new evidence of an association between cardiorespiratory fitness and brain health, particularly in gray matter and total brain volume — regions of the brain involved with cognitive decline and aging.

What will make grandma use her Fitbit longer?

For older adults, Fitbits and other activity trackers may be popular gifts, but they may not be used for very long. While counterintuitive, engaging in competition with family and friends decreases the odds of long-term use among older adults, perhaps because they feel it’s demotivating, according to a new Michigan State University study.

PARADE/CLEVELAND CLINIC HEALTHY NOW SURVEY REVEALS: TECHNOLOGY’s GROWING INFLUENCE ON HEALTH BEHAVIORS

October 11, 2019 – Who are Americans more likely to take health advice from…their doctors or an Instagram influencer? Would U.S. adults rather talk or text? Socialize in real life or scroll through social media? Parade magazine and Cleveland Clinic joined forces for the second year in a row to poll Americans on their adoption of health, lifestyle, fitness and diet trends and takes a look at how social media has helped move health practices that once seemed extreme into the mainstream.