‘Flushing’ out drug use trends early in the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic drastically affected people’s lives, especially early on. Today, scientists report that wastewater analysis identified drugs that people turned to for relief and those that plummeted in use, between March and June 2020. They will present their results at ACS Fall 2021.

The Future of Masking Post-Vaccination

The COVID-19 vaccine is your best defense against the virus, but when and where should you continue to wear a mask? Rush infectious disease expert Michael Lin, MD, answers questions about wearing a mask post-vaccination.

More American parents of teens are purchasing firearms during the pandemic, study finds

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, 10% of all households with high school-age teens reported buying a firearm, and 3% of U.S. households with teens became first-time gun owners. For households that already owned a firearm, these new firearms were more likely to be acquired by those who already reported storing at least one gun unlocked and loaded. This concerned researchers, as the single biggest risk factor for adolescent firearm injuries is access to an unsecured firearm.

COVID-19 pandemic drinking: increases among women, Black adults, and people with children

Risky drinking has been a public health concern in the U.S. for decades, but the significant increase in retail alcohol sales following COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home orders in particular raised red flags for alcohol researchers. New research has assessed changes in alcohol drinking patterns from before to after the enactment of stay-at-home orders. These results and others will be shared at the 44th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA), which will be held virtually this year from the 19th – 23rd of June 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A Crisis of Comfort

In “The Comfort Crisis,” UNLV journalism professor Michael Easter investigates how our modern-day comforts are linked to some of our most pressing problems—obesity, chronic disease, depression—and how by leaving our comfort zone, we can improve our overall mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Rutgers Champion of Student Health and Wellness is Retiring

When Melodee Lasky joined Rutgers University 19 years ago, behavioral and mental health services were scattered across the individual colleges with little coordination. Psychiatry and the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program were part of student health, but counseling services were separated and college-affiliated. Lasky, a physician who recognized the connection between physical and emotional wellness, recommended that mental and behavioral health be integrated within the framework of student health. That led to the creation of CAPS – Counseling, Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program & Psychiatric Services – a program that helps about 4,500 students each year.

Even During Pandemic, Volunteers Bring Comfort

The Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai sees more than 85,000 patients each year. Among the first to greet those patients and their loved ones–even during the coronavirus pandemic–are Cedars-Sinai’s blue-coated volunteers, who are honored this week during National Volunteer Appreciation Week.

Cedars-Sinai Demo Day Goes Virtual

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented innovation on the part of healthcare providers everywhere who rose to meet the challenges of the past year.

And the next generation of healthcare innovations will be on display during the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator Demo Day, on Wednesday, April 7, from 3:30-5 p.m. Click here to register to attend the virtual event.

#YearofCOVID Tip Sheet

One year has passed since stay-at-home orders went into effect across the U.S. and the COVID-19 pandemic changed our lives in profound ways. During this dark year, we’ve witnessed overwhelming loss of life and livelihood, and separation from those we love. But we have also seen courageous patients and heroic healthcare workers battling the disease, as swift breakthroughs have brought us vaccines and hope.

#YearofCOVID: The Evolution of Care

Peter Chen, MD, remembers those early days of March 2020 as one of swirling hyperactivity in the intensive care unit he leads at Cedars-Sinai. Chen and his team were struggling to respond to an emerging health crisis that was quickly growing into a global pandemic.

Leading Lights of Electrochemistry Assemble at October 240th ECS Meeting

ECS is proud to announce that the 240th ECS Meeting will take place at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL, from October 10-14, 2021. The Electrochemistry in Space Symposium is a highlight of the meeting, among other events. Learn more!

Civil or At War? Mail-In Voting and the 2020 Election

Abraham Lincoln. The country’s 16th president is known for many things: Signing the Emancipation Proclamation. Appearing on the $5 bill. Helping to usher in the modern-day practice of mail-in voting. Not familiar with that last one? UNLV professor Michael Green to the rescue! He’s a historian who specializes in the Civil War era, which is right around the time mail-in ballots became a prominent piece of U.

Land Development in New Jersey Continues to Slow

Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. Between 2012 and 2015, 10,392 acres in the Garden State became urban land. That’s 3,464 acres a year – far lower than the 16,852 acres per year in the late 1990s and continuing the trend of decreasing urban development that began in the 2008 Great Recession.

Clubs Closed? Study Finds Partygoers Turn to Virtual Raves and Happy Hours During Pandemic

People have traded in nightclubs and dance festivals for virtual raves and Zoom happy hours as a result of lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic—yet, many are using drugs in these socially distanced settings, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research at NYU School of Global Public Health.

KIDNEY HEALTH INITIATIVE URGES THE ACCELERATION OF HOME THERAPY TECHNOLOGY IN RESPONSE TO CORONAVIRUS 2019 (COVID-19)

The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the vulnerability of people with kidney failure who rely on in-center hemodialysis. People with kidney failure are at high risk of severe COVID-19 complications and are exposed to infection due to a kidney replacement therapy process that requires traveling to a dialysis facility multiple times a week.

Orthopaedic surgeons available to comment on the impact of COVID-19 on postponed elective surgery, the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries during a pandemic, and how patients can safely ease into outdoor activities after social distancing.

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented situation that has raised healthcare questions for patients of all ages.  If you need an orthopaedic surgeon to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on patients’ musculoskeletal health, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)…

A New Way to Accurately Estimate COVID-19 Death Toll

A Rutgers engineer has created a mathematical model that accurately estimates the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world. The model, detailed in a study published in the journal Mathematics, predicted the death toll would eventually reach about 68,120 in the United States as a result of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus that causes COVID-19. That’s based on data available on April 28, and there was high confidence (99 percent) the expected death toll would be between 66,055 and 70,304.

Expert available to discuss ways to talk to your child about missing out due to COVID-19

It is the time of year when many young people would be attending prom, taking part in athletic games, participating in graduation and preparing summer plans. Due to the pandemic, many children are going to miss activities that have become…

DePaul University experts available to discuss recovery, life after the COVID-19 pandemic

Recovery. Reentry. Reopen. Return. A new normal. Faculty experts at DePaul University are available for news media interviews about what comes next — after the COVID-19 pandemic. Does the world return to normal or will there be fundamental changes to how we live our lives, work, and travel; and how we are governed?

Rutgers Expert Available to Speak About COVID-19 and Heightened Risk for Those Living with HIV

Preliminary data has shown that people living with HIV may be at heightened risk for severe complications from COVID-19 because they are simultaneously experiencing two epidemics that are synergistically interacting to create increased odds of death and disability. However, HIV…

Rutgers Experts Can Discuss Emissions, Climate Change During COVID-19 Crisis

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 13, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick experts are available for interviews on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on greenhouse gas emissions, climate change and efforts to promote a greener economy and lifestyles. “During the 2007…

Ad Astra Coalition created to help in the fight against COVID-19

A coalition of businesses and government partners, the Ad Astra Coalition has joined together to answer some of the challenges being created in Wichita and Kansas by the COVID-19 pandemic. The coalition is co-led by Airbus Americas Engineering, Spirit AeroSystems, Textron Aviation, Wichita State University and WSU Tech.

Researchers Team up with U.S. Coast Guard to Release and Track Three Baby Sea Turtles

Beach closures and other COVID-19 pandemic restrictions required scientists to get creative. They teamed up with the U.S. Coast Guard to make sure that three baby green sea turtles made it home. The turtles were outfitted with small solar powered satellite transmitters. Data will provide information to help scientists preserve sea turtles’ habitats and give them a hint about the effects of warmer temperatures on their offshore behavior.