COVID-19 pandemic

A Crisis of Comfort

In “The Comfort Crisis,” UNLV journalism professor Michael Easter investigates how our modern-day comforts are linked to some of our most pressing problems—obesity, chronic disease, depression—and how by leaving our comfort zone, we can improve our overall mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Rutgers Champion of Student Health and Wellness is Retiring

When Melodee Lasky joined Rutgers University 19 years ago, behavioral and mental health services were scattered across the individual colleges with little coordination. Psychiatry and the Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program were part of student health, but counseling services were separated and college-affiliated. Lasky, a physician who recognized the connection between physical and emotional wellness, recommended that mental and behavioral health be integrated within the framework of student health. That led to the creation of CAPS – Counseling, Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program & Psychiatric Services – a program that helps about 4,500 students each year.

Even During Pandemic, Volunteers Bring Comfort

The Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai sees more than 85,000 patients each year. Among the first to greet those patients and their loved ones–even during the coronavirus pandemic–are Cedars-Sinai’s blue-coated volunteers, who are honored this week during National Volunteer Appreciation Week.

Cedars-Sinai Demo Day Goes Virtual

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented innovation on the part of healthcare providers everywhere who rose to meet the challenges of the past year.

And the next generation of healthcare innovations will be on display during the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator Demo Day, on Wednesday, April 7, from 3:30-5 p.m. Click here to register to attend the virtual event.

#YearofCOVID Tip Sheet

One year has passed since stay-at-home orders went into effect across the U.S. and the COVID-19 pandemic changed our lives in profound ways. During this dark year, we’ve witnessed overwhelming loss of life and livelihood, and separation from those we love. But we have also seen courageous patients and heroic healthcare workers battling the disease, as swift breakthroughs have brought us vaccines and hope.

#YearofCOVID: Resilience on the Front Lines

Vibeke Hirsch, RN, a nurse at Cedars-Sinai Marina del Rey Hospital, vividly remembers the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic when she had more questions than answers and returned home depleted after 12-hour shifts in her COVID-19 unit—longing only to take her dog, Dozer, for a quick walk and then go to sleep.

#YearofCOVID: The Evolution of Care

Peter Chen, MD, remembers those early days of March 2020 as one of swirling hyperactivity in the intensive care unit he leads at Cedars-Sinai. Chen and his team were struggling to respond to an emerging health crisis that was quickly growing into a global pandemic.

COVID-19 Crisis: Chaplains Care for Staff Through Surge

Cedars-Sinai chaplains usually spend their days rounding on patients, tending to the sick and their families by offering a listening ear, a guiding word or a hopeful prayer. But the COVID-19 pandemic has altered their workload, with chaplains increasingly tending to the needs of tired, frustrated and burnt-out frontline healthcare workers.

Civil or At War? Mail-In Voting and the 2020 Election

Abraham Lincoln. The country’s 16th president is known for many things: Signing the Emancipation Proclamation. Appearing on the $5 bill. Helping to usher in the modern-day practice of mail-in voting. Not familiar with that last one? UNLV professor Michael Green to the rescue! He’s a historian who specializes in the Civil War era, which is right around the time mail-in ballots became a prominent piece of U.

Land Development in New Jersey Continues to Slow

Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it’s unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. Between 2012 and 2015, 10,392 acres in the Garden State became urban land. That’s 3,464 acres a year – far lower than the 16,852 acres per year in the late 1990s and continuing the trend of decreasing urban development that began in the 2008 Great Recession.

Clubs Closed? Study Finds Partygoers Turn to Virtual Raves and Happy Hours During Pandemic

People have traded in nightclubs and dance festivals for virtual raves and Zoom happy hours as a result of lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic—yet, many are using drugs in these socially distanced settings, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research at NYU School of Global Public Health.

A New Way to Accurately Estimate COVID-19 Death Toll

A Rutgers engineer has created a mathematical model that accurately estimates the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world. The model, detailed in a study published in the journal Mathematics, predicted the death toll would eventually reach about 68,120 in the United States as a result of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus that causes COVID-19. That’s based on data available on April 28, and there was high confidence (99 percent) the expected death toll would be between 66,055 and 70,304.

Researchers Team up with U.S. Coast Guard to Release and Track Three Baby Sea Turtles

Beach closures and other COVID-19 pandemic restrictions required scientists to get creative. They teamed up with the U.S. Coast Guard to make sure that three baby green sea turtles made it home. The turtles were outfitted with small solar powered satellite transmitters. Data will provide information to help scientists preserve sea turtles’ habitats and give them a hint about the effects of warmer temperatures on their offshore behavior.