Study: COVID Tech Took a Toll on Work-from-Home Moms

Research by UNLV communications expert Natalie Pennington finds that texts, video calls burdened the mental health of working moms during pandemic.

WashU Experts: Let nature of work dictate return-to-work plans

Many employers have already begun transitioning employees back to the office, while others plan to resume in-office work in the coming months. But after more than a year of working from home, is returning to business as usual even possible? Or desirable?Employees have changed amid this pandemic. The more a company can match employee preferences and the optimal work conditions required for a given role, the better off they’ll be in terms of hiring and employee retention, according to Peter Boumgarden, an organizational behavior expert at Washington University in St.

What’s next: The ongoing urban exodus

Many employees have come to prefer working from home after being forced to do so more than a year ago when the pandemic started. By some estimates, at least one-quarter of employees will still be working remotely multiple days a week at the end of 2021. For those whose jobs allow it, being untethered from the office might mean moving farther away from it – by a few miles or a few hundred.

Finnish expert available to comment on how Finland has succeeded in its COVID-driven transition to remote work: over 86% of knowledge-workers still happy with working from home

Matti Vartiainen is a senior advisor and professor (emer.) of work and organizational psychology at Aalto University. His research focuses on organizational innovations, digital work, new ways of working (mobile and multi-locational work, distributed teams and organizations), collaborative working environments…

The rise of ‘Zoom Towns’ in the rural west

COVID-19 has expedited a trend of migration into western gateway communities—remote workers are fleeing cities to ride out the pandemic. A new study using data from 2018 found that growing populations caused urgent planning pressures, and officials felt unprepared to respond to and prepare for problems associated with rapid growth.

WVU receives $25 million gift to support outdoor economic development, develop new remote worker program

Through the newly named Brad and Alys Smith Outdoor Economic Development Collaborative, the $25 million donation – one of the largest in WVU’s history – will provide initial funding for a remote worker program, a groundbreaking initiative designed to help individuals and young families prosper amid the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Business leaders need to address psychological impacts of working from home

The sudden transition to remote work has psychological impacts on working and business leaders need to adapt to help their employees stay productive and enjoy their jobs, says Surinder Kahai, associate professor at the School of Management at Binghamton University,…

Ergonomics 101: Working from Home During Coronavirus

Marshmallow-soft couch cushions and a cutesy vintage chair here. Dim lighting and blackout curtains there. Ah, there’s nothing like the comforts of home. Except during a pandemic. Across the nation, new work-from-home and distance learning routines amid the COVID-19 outbreak have many people — and their strained necks, backs, and eyes — wishing they could trade those home comforts for the comforts of the office.

Expert: How best practices from first responders can help you work through COVID-19 disruption

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Stay-at-home orders and social distancing have disrupted day-to-day life as the world works to mitigate the effects of the global coronavirus pandemic. Work teams have quickly shifted to telecommuting, swapping face-to-face meetings with videoconferencing, and moving from…

AIP Proactively Moves to Remote Work Due to Coronavirus; Business to Continue as Usual

In an abundance of caution, American Institute of Physics employees will be working remotely beginning Monday, March 16, 2020, to reduce potential exposure to the coronavirus. AIP will transition to remote work until further notice. AIP staff will be available and working on their normal duties during this period, and the building where AIP is housed, the American Center for Physics, will remain open but unavailable to visitors.

AIP Proactively Moves to Remote Work Due to Coronavirus; Business to Continue as Usual

In an abundance of caution, American Institute of Physics employees will be working remotely beginning Monday, March 16, 2020, to reduce potential exposure to the coronavirus. AIP will transition to remote work until further notice. AIP staff will be available and working on their normal duties during this period, and the building where AIP is housed, the American Center for Physics, will remain open but unavailable to visitors.