No increase in brain health problems in middle age for men who played football in high school

Decades after their days on the gridiron, middle-aged men who played football in high school are not experiencing greater problems with concentration, memory, or depression compared to men who did not play football, reports a study in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Blood test for depression, bipolar disorder offers promise of personalized treatment

Worldwide, 1 in 4 people will suffer from a depressive episode in their lifetime.
While current diagnosis and treatment approaches are largely trial and error, a breakthrough study by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers sheds new light on the biological basis of mood disorders and offers a promising blood test aimed at a precision-medicine approach to treatment.

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Childhood Car Crash Inspires UC San Diego Alumni to Donate to Pediatric Research

UC San Diego alumni make a gift of $1 million towards first-of-its-kind pediatric research. The Cathy and Richard Tryon Pediatric Facial/Psychological Trauma Research Fund will support research at UC San Diego to benefit pediatric patients who have suffered from traumatic facial deformities.

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Wayne State developing statewide mental health program to address stress among first responders and their families

The Wayne State University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health Sciences has teamed with the State of Michigan to develop a comprehensive behavioral and mental health training and support program for the state’s first responders and their families to address the stress they face in their duties protecting residents.

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How Does Your Brain Process Emotions? Answer Could Help Address Loneliness Epidemic

In a study published in the March 5, 2021 online edition of Cerebral Cortex, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that specific regions of the brain respond to emotional stimuli related to loneliness and wisdom in opposing ways.

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Mental health app equally effective, half the cost

Digital mental health apps and internet-based treatments could overcome both access problems and provider shortages. But these apps have yet to be adopted in the U.S. healthcare system. One reason is that these apps need payment and reimbursement models that would enable broad adoption.

Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine recently published results to help propel policymakers to create these payment models. They proved that an app to help people with serious mental illness was just as effective as a clinic-based group intervention for half the cost.

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Dr. Jill RachBeisel, Appointed Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the UM School of Medicine

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that Jill RachBeisel, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, has been appointed to serve as the Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, effective immediately. Dr. RachBeisel has served as the Department’s Interim Chair for the past two years and was previously Acting Chair and Vice Chair of the Department.

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Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Receives $8 Million Bequest from Philanthropist and Mental Health Advocate Stephen Lieber

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced that is has received a bequest of $8 million from the noted philanthropist and mental health advocate Stephen Lieber. The Foundation is the world’s largest private funder of mental health research grants, and this gift will be used to expand its support for research that is transforming the lives of people living with mental illness.

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Increase in pleasurable effects of alcohol over time can predict alcohol use disorder

A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine following young adult drinkers for 10 years has found that individuals who reported the highest sensitivity to alcohol’s pleasurable and rewarding effects at the start of the trial were more likely to develop an alcohol use disorder (AUD) over the course of the study.

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New paper proposes framework for eliminating defects in psychiatric care

A new paper from University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center proposes a framework for eliminating defects in behavioral health treatment.
The authors cite that a large majority of defects are the result of system failures rather than due to the individual psychiatrist, and they propose that psychiatrists need to function as “systems engineers” to help eliminate these defects in healthcare organizations.

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Student Medical Records at UC San Diego Make Epic Change and a California First

UC San Diego was the first university in California to connect 40,000 student health records to the electronic health record platform of its top-ranked academic medical center, UC San Diego Health. The experience has created a model for other colleges.

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Mindfulness interventions can change health behaviors – Integrated model helps to explain how they work

A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of mindfulness approaches to promote positive changes in health behaviors. New neurobiologically based models of “mindful self-regulation” help to explain the how mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) work to help people make healthy behavior changes, according to a review in the November/December issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Psychedelic Treatment with Psilocybin Relieves Major Depression, Study Shows

In a small study of adults with major depression, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that two doses of the psychedelic substance psilocybin, given with supportive psychotherapy, produced rapid and large reductions in depressive symptoms, with most participants showing improvement and half of study participants achieving remission through the four-week follow-up.

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¬Children With Asymptomatic Brain Bleeds As Newborns Show Normal Brain Development At Age 2

A study by UNC School of Medicine researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage.

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From San Diego to Italy, Study Suggests Wisdom can Protect Against Loneliness

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were.

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Violence Risk Assessment in Mental Health Care – Journal of Psychiatric Practice Outlines a Therapeutic Risk Management Approach

Assessing the potential for violent behavior by patients with psychiatric disorders is an essential but challenging responsibility for mental health professionals. A five-part series currently being published in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice summarizes an expert approach to screening, assessment, and management of the risk of “other-directed violence.” The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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With Digital Phenotyping, Smartphones May Play a Role in Assessing Severe Mental Illness

Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings – combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data – have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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University of Miami Miller School Researcher Wins NIH Avenir Award to Pursue Innovative Opioid Addiction Research

Luis M. Tuesta, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has been awarded the Avenir Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health, to study the epigenetic mechanisms of microglial activation and their role in shaping the behavioral course of opioid use disorder.

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Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?

Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. Unique to this precision medicine study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, is an assessment of cognitive control and reward-related brain activity, two facets of brain function that are impaired in people with depression. Like previous studies, this one showed that aerobic exercise helps young adults with major depression.

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These drugs carry risks & may not help, but many dementia patients get them anyway, study finds

Nearly three-quarters of older adults with dementia have filled prescriptions for medicines that act on their brain and nervous system, but aren’t designed for dementia, a new study shows. That’s despite the special risks that such drugs carry for older adults — and the lack of evidence that they actually ease dementia-related behavior problems.

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Epigenetic Changes in ADNP Syndrome, a Cause of Autism, Do Not Indicate Profound Presentation of the Disorder

A study led by the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai found that two different blood epigenetic signatures associated with ADNP syndrome (also known as Helsmoortel-Van Der Aa syndrome) have only a modest correlation with clinical manifestations of the syndrome.

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Current Clinical Trial Assessing Potential of CBD in Treatment of Autism

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine are recruiting eligible children between the ages of seven and fourteen years for a Phase III clinical trial to determine whether cannabidiol (CBD) reduces severe behavior problems in children with autism spectrum disorder.

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Longitudinal Study of Brain Aging and Cognitive Change Receives $19 Million Grant

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues elsewhere, will receive almost $19 million over five years for the fourth phase of the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging, which investigates cognition, aging and the risk for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

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