Study from “Black Tuesday” bushfires finds link to PTSD

New research published in the Australian Journal of Rural Health has shown people who are forced to relocate after a bushfire are at a higher risk of suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, otherwise known as PTSD. Led by Associate Professor Venkatesan Thiruvenkatarajan from the University of Adelaide, and Dr Richard Watts from Flinders University, the researchers spoke with people affected by the 2005 “Black Tuesday” Eyre Peninsula bushfires, which took nine lives, destroyed 93 homes and blackened 80,000 hectares of land near Port Lincoln on 11 January, 2005.

Intestinal Abnormalities in People with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Don’t Improve Even When PTSD Symptoms Abate

Article title: Abnormal intestinal milieu in post-traumatic stress disorder is not impacted by treatment that improves symptoms Authors: Robin M. Voigt, Alyson K. Zalta, Shohreh Raeisi, Lijuan Zhang, J. Mark Brown, Christopher B. Forsyth, Randy A. Boley, Philip Held, Mark…

PTSD symptoms vary over course of menstrual cycle

In women who have experienced trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms may vary over the course of the menstrual cycle, with more symptoms during the first few days of the cycle when the hormone estradiol is low, and fewer symptoms close to ovulation, when estradiol is high, finds research published by the American Psychological Association.

Mount Sinai’s Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research Receives $5 Million Grant From The Bob & Renee Parsons Foundation

Funds will support cutting-edge MDMA-assisted therapy for PTSD

Healing trauma: Research links PTSD, emotion regulation and quality of life

Research from Binghamton University, State University of New York provides insight into the impact PTSD has on emotional regulation and quality of life, and points to ways to improve both.

The Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation Grants More than $2.1 Million to Support a Psychedelics Research Study at Mount Sinai

The Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai today announced a $2.1 million charitable contribution by the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation.

Mealer, Moss Receive AACN Award for Efforts to Reduce Burnout Among Critical Care Clinicians

Meredith Mealer, PhD, RN, and Marc Moss, MD, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, receive the 2021 AACN Pioneering Spirit Award in recognition of their collaborative work over the past 20 years to improve the mental health of healthcare workers, especially nurses.

Childhood Car Crash Inspires UC San Diego Alumni to Donate to Pediatric Research

UC San Diego alumni make a gift of $1 million towards first-of-its-kind pediatric research. The Cathy and Richard Tryon Pediatric Facial/Psychological Trauma Research Fund will support research at UC San Diego to benefit pediatric patients who have suffered from traumatic facial deformities.

Psychedelic Science Holds Promise for Mainstream Medicine

A team of UNLV neuroscientists are uncovering how psychedelics affect brain activity. Their work, published recently in Nature: Scientific Reports, shows a strong connection in rodent models between brain activity and behaviors resulting from psychedelic treatment, a step forward in the quest to better understand their potential therapeutic effects.

UCLA seeks volunteers for study of COVID-19’s impact on health to support “longhaul” survivors

UCLA researchers are seeking participants for an innovative study examining the impact of COVID-19 on survivors who continue battling health issues long after they were infected and thought to have recovered, known informally as “long COVID” and “longhaulers.”

Mount Sinai Health System Launches Center for Psychedelic Research

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has launched a new center for psychedelics research. The Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research pursues a multipronged clinical and research approach to discovering novel and more efficacious therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and other stress-related conditions in the veteran and civilian population.

Study Suggests Brain Injuries May Evolve, Not Resolve, Over Time

Service members with concussions may have symptoms that continue to evolve up to five years after the initial injury, according to a study published in the November 11, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The findings challenge the idea that these individuals with chronic brain injuries maintain a relatively stable course of recovery.

Motor Neuron Drug Shows Promise as Treatment for PTSD Symptoms Linked to Suicide Attempts

A medication used to treat motor neuron diseases, like Lou Gehrig’s disease, might also have the potential to help treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), particularly the symptoms linked to suicide attempts, according to a study, “Randomized Controlled Trial of Riluzole Augmentation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Efficacy of a Glutamatergic Modulator for Antidepressant-Resistant Symptoms,” published Oct. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU).

Multiple Paths to Recovery Among Patients With Co-Occurring Alcohol Use and Mental Health Disorders

A study has revealed diverse routes to recovery among people with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders admitted for psychiatric inpatient care, while highlighting that some patients need additional support. Problem drinkers who also have a psychiatric condition — such as major depressive disorder (MDD) — often struggle to sustain long-term recovery following treatment. Mutual health groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) can provide an ongoing source of recovery support for alcohol misuse, and involvement with AA is also linked to improvement in depression. However, it was not known how depression and involvement influence drinking during and after inpatient psychiatric treatment, and how they predict recovery. The new study, reported in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, investigated long-term trajectories of alcohol use, depression, and AA involvement over time among patients with co-occurring diagnoses.

McLean Psychiatrists Available to Discuss Trump’s COVID/Mental Health Connection

Media AdvisoryTrump’s COVID/Mental Health Connection WHAT:  With today’s news about President Trump’s positive COVID test, more research to explore what we know about how older adults manage following a COVID diagnosis is crucial.  A team from McLean geriatric department have…

People with Lower Biological Response to Standard Stress Task Showed More PTSD Symptoms After COVID-19 Crisis Began

People who did not have a large heart rate response to a stress task surprised researchers later — after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic — when they showed more symptoms of PTSD related to the crisis than others who also did the stress task and COVID-19 stress ratings.

Children Who Witness Intimate Partner Violence Benefit from Joint Community and Law Enforcement Intervention

The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

This spring they were heroes, but summer may be cruel for health professionals, experts say

An outpouring of public support may have helped maintain the spirits and well-being of health care workers as they faced the early months of the coronavirus pandemic. But as the salutes fade into memory, and COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations rise across the United States, mental health experts are worried about the health care workers-turned-heroes who were so much in the spotlight a few months ago.

Vets Walking Pets: Strolls with Shelter Dogs May Reduce PTSD Symptoms in Military Veterans

About 6 to 8 million dogs end up in shelters in the U.S. each year. Researchers worked with two no-kill shelters on a study examining the effects of walking with a shelter dog on psychological and physiological stress indicators in military veterans. Results confirm the importance of the human-animal bond and provide evidence that walking with a shelter dog may affect psychological and physiological stress indicators in veterans – with particular potential benefits for those with an increase in PTSD symptom severity.

$1M to study treatment for first responders with PTSD

The randomized control trial will focus on the effectiveness of a cognitive remediation strategy called Goal Management Training that is aimed at improving cognitive functioning among PSP with PTSD. Researchers will examine changes in everyday functional outcomes, like the ability to return to work, but also in brain structure and brain function using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).