Do Passengers Want Self-driving Cars to Behave More or Less Like Them?

Researchers asked participants about their personal driving behaviors such as speed, changing lanes, accelerating and decelerating and passing other vehicles. They also asked them the same questions about their expectations of a self-driving car performing these very same tasks. The objective of the study was to examine trust and distrust to see if there is a relationship between an individual’s driving behaviors and how they expect a self-driving car to behave.

Artificial Intelligence aids in discovery of new prognostic biomarkers for breast cancer

Scientists at Case Western Reserve University have used Artificial Intelligence (AI) to identify new biomarkers for breast cancer that can predict whether the cancer will return after treatment—and which can be identified from routinely acquired tissue biopsy samples of early-stage breast cancer.

NSF makes $20 Million investment in Optimization-focused AI Research Institute led by UC San Diego

The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced today an investment of $220 million to establish 11 artificial intelligence (AI) institutes, each receiving $20 million over five years. One of these, The Institute for Learning-enabled Optimization at Scale (TILOS), will be led by the University of California San Diego.

Appropriate Technologies: The COVID-19-Era Heroes Yet to Come to “Center Stage”

The COVID-19 outbreaks in Thailand have seen an ever-increasing number of infections as new clusters are emerging. The faculty members of Sasin School of Management — Prof. Dr. Kua Wongboonsin, Asst. Prof. Dr. Piyachart Phiromswad, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pattanaporn Chatjuthamard, Asst. Prof. Dr. Pattarake Sarajoti, and Asst. Prof. Dr. Sabin Srivannaboon, with financial support from the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT), jointly present ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19 sustainably in a study to identify technologies that can instantly and appropriately help professionals who find social distancing difficult.

Harnessing AI To Search for New Materials With Exotic Properties

With the support of a prestigious $542,813 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grant, physicist Trevor David Rhone is turning to artificial intelligence to help determine which combination of elements might form new materials with interesting properties for advancing both scientific understanding and technological applications, such as data storage, spintronics, and quantum computing.

AI Learns to Predict Human Behavior from Videos

New Columbia Engineering study unveils a computer vision technique for giving machines a more intuitive sense for what will happen next by leveraging higher-level associations between people, animals, and objects.“Our algorithm is a step toward machines being able to make better predictions about human behavior, and thus better coordinate their actions with ours,” said Computer Science Professor Carl Vondrick. “Our results open a number of possibilities for human-robot collaboration, autonomous vehicles, and assistive technology.”

Human Voice Recognition AI Now a reality — “Thai Speech Emotion Recognition Data Sets and Models” Now Free to Download

Chulalongkorn University’s Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Arts have jointly developed the “Thai Speech Emotion Recognition Data Sets and Models”, now available for free downloads, to help enhance sales operations and service systems to better respond to customers’ needs.

Disaster Response and Mitigation in an AI World

PNNL researchers are expanding PNNL’s operational Rapid Analytics for Disaster Response (RADR) image analytics and modeling suite to predict the path of fires, floods and other natural disasters, giving first responders an upper hand. The suite utilizes a combination of image-capturing technology (satellite, airborne, and drone images), artificial intelligence, and cloud computing, to not only assess damage but predict it as well.

AI Predicts How Patients with Viral Infections, Including COVID-19, Will Fare

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered gene expression patterns associated with pandemic viral infections, providing a map to help define patients’ immune responses, measure disease severity, predict outcomes and test therapies — for current and future pandemics.

The Mount Sinai Hospital Recognized as No. 4 on Newsweek’s World’s Best Smart Hospital 2021 List

The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked No. 1 in the New York City metropolitan area and No. 4 globally among the most technologically advanced health care institutions on Newsweek’s list of “The World’s Best Smart Hospitals 2021.”

The Robot Smiled Back

Long interested in interactions between robots and humans, Columbia Engineering researchers have created EVA, a new autonomous robot with a soft and expressive face that responds to match the expressions of nearby humans. “The idea for EVA took shape a few years ago, when my students and I began to notice that the robots in our lab were staring back at us through plastic, googly eyes,” said Prof Hod Lipson, who led the team.

Maximizing cancer survival, minimizing treatment side effects with AI

Computer scientists at the University of Illinois Chicago are developing a computational artificial intelligence system they hope will serve as a decision support tool for doctors prescribing treatment for head and neck cancer. The work is supported by a $2.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

A “Horizon Strategy” Framework for Science and Technology Policy

The current U.S. innovation model has in multiple respects fallen short in the face of today’s technology competition challenges. MITRE calls for a national-level effort between government, industry, and academia to address the most critical S&T priorities.

From Curb to Doorstep: Driving Efficiencies for Delivering Goods

In a collaboration between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington’s Urban Freight Lab, a prototype webapp has been developed that combines smart sensors and machine learning to predict parking space availability. The prototype is ready for initial testing to help commercial delivery drivers find open spaces without expending fuel and losing time and patience.

Bringing medical AI closer to reality

For AI to continue to transform cancer diagnoses, researchers will have to prove that the success of their machine-learning tools can be reproduced from site to site and among different patient populations. Biomedical engineering researchers at Case Western Reserve University say they doing just that. They say they have demonstrated that their novel algorithms for distinguishing between benign and malignant lung cancer nodules on CT scan images from one site can now be successfully reproduced with patients from other sites and locations.

ORNL’s Sergei Kalinin elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America

Sergei Kalinin, a scientist and inventor at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America professional society.

ORNL’s superb materials expertise, data and AI tools propel progress

At the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists use artificial intelligence, or AI, to accelerate the discovery and development of materials for energy and information technologies.

Case Western Reserve awarded $3 million National Cancer Institute grant to apply AI to immunotherapy in lung cancer patients

Medical researchers from Case Western Reserve University, New York University (NYU), and University Hospitals have been awarded a five-year, $3 million National Cancer Institute grant to develop and apply artificial intelligence (AI) tools for predicting which lung cancer patients will respond to immunotherapy.

NUS researchers harness AI to identify cancer cells by their acidity

Healthy and cancer cells can look similar under a microscope. One way of differentiating them is by examining the level of acidity, or pH level, inside the cells. Tapping on this distinguishing characteristic, a research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a technique that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to determine whether a single cell is healthy or cancerous by analysing its pH. Each cancer test can be completed in under 35 minutes, and single cells can be classified with an accuracy rate of more than 95 per cent.

FAU Researchers Receive Prestigious NSF CAREER Awards

Two researchers from FAU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science have received the coveted National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career (CAREER) awards totaling more than $1 million. Xiangnan Zhong, Ph.D. and Zhen Ni, Ph.D., assistant professors in the Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, received the NSF CAREER awards to drive the current artificial intelligence (AI) wave.

GW Receives Funding to Develop Artificial Intelligence Systems Aimed at Helping People with Health Problems Drive Safely

Samer Hamdar, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the George Washington University, is partnering with Moment AI to launch a project aimed at developing AI systems that could one day prevent health-induced traffic accidents, including those linked to stress.

Institutional Impacts on Enrollment from Forthcoming Demographic Cliff Will Vary Widely

The “birth dearth” of the 2008 economic recession means fewer students will graduate from high school through at least 2032, draining college enrollments and revenues. Admissions research firm, Othot, published a report analyzing how this might affect 454 colleges and universities. As an example, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois – Chicago which are in the same region, will experience the national and regional declines differently because of where they recruit.

COVID, CAMERAS and AI: the story of a pandemic drone

As the COVID-19 death toll mounts and the world hangs its hopes on effective vaccines, what else can we do to save lives in this pandemic? In UniSA’s case, design world-first technology that combines engineering, drones, cameras, and artificial intelligence to monitor people’s vital health signs remotely.

In 2020 the University of South Australia joined forces with the world’s oldest commercial drone manufacturer, Draganfly Inc, to develop technology which remotely detects the key symptoms of COVID-19 – breathing and heart rates, temperature, and blood oxygen levels.

Within months, the technology had moved from drones to security cameras and kiosks, scanning vital health signs in 15 seconds and adding social distancing software to the mix.

In September 2020, Alabama State University became the first higher education institution in the world to use the technology to spot COVID-19 symptoms in its staff and students and enforce social distancing, ensuring they had one of the l

Federal COVID-19 response taps UCI Health as a model for delivering monoclonal antibody therapy

Irvine, Calif., Feb. 9, 2021 — Monoclonal antibodies are showing promise for improving outcomes for COVID-19 patients, but when a hospital is already beyond capacity, administering them can be a challenge. As hospitalizations soared across California, clinicians with UCI Health created a system for delivering monoclonal antibodies that is keeping hospital beds available for patients with the greatest need.