Rock Musicians Rufus Wainwright, Lisa Loeb, Tim Reynolds and More to Perform Free Virtual Concert for Colorectal Cancer Awareness

The American College of Gastroenterology Invites All to “Tune It Up: A Concert To Raise Awareness of Colorectal Cancer” Free Webstream Event Open to All on March 31, 2021 at 8:00 pm EDT

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‘Leap forward’ in risk management of rectal cancer

Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the third-most common type of cancer in the United States, and treatment and surgery greatly affect the quality of life of patients. A multi-disciplinary team at Washington University in St. Louis has developed and tested an innovative imaging technique that is able to differentiate between rectal tissues with residual cancers and those without tumors after chemotherapy and radiation, which could one day help to avoid unnecessary surgeries in some patients who have achieved complete tumor destruction after chemoradiation.

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American College of Gastroenterology Issues Updated Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines

The American College of Gastroenterology has issued updated evidence-based screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC), including a new recommendation to begin CRC screening at age 45 for average risk adults. Key updates include recommendations for screening individuals with family history of CRC or polyps, guidance on the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of CRC, quality indicators for adenoma detection rate and colonoscopy withdrawal time, as well as suggestions about evidence-based interventions to boost screening rates, especially among African Americans. The authors distinguish between one-step screening tests, such as colonoscopy, and two-step screening tests that require colonoscopy, if positive, in order to complete the screening process.

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Fight CRC To Present Research Findings on The Impact of COVID-19 on the Colorectal Cancer Community at 2021 GI ASCO

Fight Colorectal Cancer presents abstract at Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium highlighting the need to address the barriers and opportunities for care within the colorectal cancer community during the COVID-19 pandemic

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Some rectal cancer patients can safely avoid an aggressive operation

A nonsurgical treatment option for rectal cancer that preserves quality of life is safe for carefully selected patients, according to a new study comparing it with the standard operation. The study results appear online as an “article in press” on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website in advance of print publication and were presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

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ASTRO issues clinical guideline on radiation therapy for rectal cancer

A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides guidance for physicians who use radiation therapy to treat patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Recommendations outline indications and best practices for pelvic radiation treatments, as well as the integration of radiation with chemotherapy and surgery for stage II-III disease. The guideline, which replaces ASTRO’s 2016 guidance for rectal cancer, is published in Practical Radiation Oncology.

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Daily coffee consumption associated with improved survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study.

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Center for Asian Health Equity awarded $4.25 million CDC grant to prevent colorectal cancer in Illinois

The University of Chicago Medicine’s Center for Asian Health Equity has received a five-year, $4.25 million federal grant to increase colorectal cancer screenings, particularly among underserved and rural Illinois communities.

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Colorectal Cancer Q&A: The Truth about Screening, Prevention, and More

A colonoscopy is the best way to screen for and prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) because it allows your doctor to find and remove precancerous growths called polyps before they have a chance to turn into cancer.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that most people have colonoscopy screenings starting at age 50. People who are at a higher risk for CRC due to family history or other factors should begin having screenings at a younger age based on their doctor’s recommendation.

Cologuard, an at-home test, is not a preventive CRC screening tool because it detects cancer after you develop it.

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Less chemotherapy may have more benefit in rectal cancer

University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the 2020 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium shows patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving lower-than-recommended doses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in fact saw their tumors shrink more than patients receiving the full dose.

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