World Trade Center Responders with the Greatest Exposure to Toxic Dust Have a Higher Likelihood of Liver Disease

Mount Sinai researchers have found evidence for the first time that World Trade Center responders had a higher likelihood of developing liver disease if they arrived at the site right after the attacks as opposed to working at Ground Zero later in the rescue and recovery efforts. Their study links the increase in liver disease risk to the quantity of toxic dust the workers were exposed to, which was greatest immediately after the September 11, 2001, attacks.

Cancer physician-scientist offers expertise on new lung cancer CT screening recommendations

Nasser Hanna, M.D., can provide expertise on the new guidelines for lung cancer screening recently issued by the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force. The USPSTF recommends yearly low-dose CT screening for those who are at high risk of developing lung…

Lung cancer experts provide knowledge on treatment innovations, tips for successful smoking cessation and more

With Lung Cancer Awareness Month upon us, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center’s scientists, physician-scientists, and staff are available to offer expertise in treatment innovations, the biology of lung cancers, research initiatives, and tips for successful smoking…

Moffitt Researchers Develop Tool to Detect Patients at High Risk for Poor Lung Cancer Outcomes

In a new study published in Nature Scientific Reports, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have shown how the use of radiomics can improve lung cancer screening by identifying early stage lung cancer patients who may be at high risk for poorer outcomes, and therefore require aggressive follow-up and/or adjuvant therapy.

UK Study Highlights Importance of Spirometry in Diagnosing COPD, Versus Over-Reliance on Medical Imaging

A UK study of patients participating in low-dose CT lung cancer screening highlights the importance of spirometry (breathing tests) in the assessment of possible chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and demonstrates that over-reliance on radiological changes alone may result in detection of clinically insignificant disease. The new study is published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.