Mental Health Care Needed More Than Ever During COVID-19 Pandemic — Telehealth Can Help Make it Happen

Live video telehealth services are a critical component of the COVID-19 response. Offered by physicians, other clinicians and health-care organizations, telehealth provides a useful method for starting and continuing essential mental health treatment without risk of spreading infection.

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BIDMC physician-scientists spearhead effort to address nationwide COVID-19 testing swab shortage

As the numbers of patients with confirmed and suspected COVID-19 in the United States continue to rise exponentially, physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, launched a collaborative and open-source effort to address the shortage of swabs that is hampering the nation’s ability to test for and track the spread of the virus. The team’s mission is to catalyze the development and clinical validation of novel designs for swabs for COVID-19 testing that can be manufactured quickly and in large numbers.

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“Phase 4” coronavirus relief package is necessary and must address three points, expert says

Jeffrey Bergstrand, professor of finance, said the just-passed Phase Three package should be sufficient to stabilize the economy and emphasized the need for Phase Four, which he said “will bring some stimulus to aggregate demand if there is a government infrastructure program put in place.”

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Infants Introduced Early to Solid Foods Show Gut Bacteria Changes that May Portend Future Health Risks

Infants who were started on solid foods at or before three months of age showed changes in the levels of gut bacteria and bacterial byproducts, called short-chain fatty acids, measured in their stool samples, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Increasing Muscle Size and Strength, Exergames and Older Adults and Treadmills and Cancer Care from Medicine & Science in Sports & Science

If you’re looking for health and fitness story ideas, view these research highlights from ACSM’s flagship research journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®.

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‘Drinking Spirits to Lift Spirits’ May Hold Appeal Amid COVID-19 Stress, but Don’t Overdo, Cautions Baylor University Expert on Substance Abuse

Drinking alcoholic beverages may be more appealing amid unease about the coronavirus, as people deal with shelter-at-home orders, fears about the economy and boredom, says a Baylor University researcher who studies alcohol use and misuse. But with regulations providing less access to alcohol, this may be a good time for individuals struggling with alcohol use to begin recovery and for others to guard against over-relying on alcohol or other substances.

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ASSESSING FORESTS FROM AFAR

A new study led by the University of Delaware’s Pinki Mondal recommends that in addition to using large swaths of coarse satellite data to evaluate forests on a national scale, it is important for countries to prioritize areas such as national parks and wildlife refuges and use finer scale data in those protected areas to make sure that they are maintaining their health and are being reported on accurately.

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Roswell Park’s Dr. Pawel Kalinski to Lead $14.5M NCI-Funded Immunotherapy Effort

A team led by Pawel Kalinski, MD, PhD, of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has earned a five-year, $14.54 million award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to expand a promising immunotherapy platform. Funded through the NCI’s Program Project Grant program, this prestigious five-year grant will fund five clinical trials, all focused on a strategy for making some of the most common immunotherapies work for more cancer patients.

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Fake Russian Twitter accounts politicized discourse about vaccines

Activity from phony Twitter accounts established by the Russian Internet Research Agency between 2015 and 2017 may have contributed to politicizing Americans’ position on the nature and efficacy of vaccines, a health care topic which has not historically fallen along party lines, according to new research published in the American Journal of Public Health.

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AI as mediator: ‘Smart’ replies help humans communicate during pandemic

Daily life during a pandemic means social distancing and finding new ways to remotely connect with friends, family and co-workers. And as we communicate online and by text, artificial intelligence could play a role in keeping our conversations on track, according to new Cornell University research.

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Digestive Symptoms Present in Mild COVID-19 Disease, Sometimes Without Fever

A new study published in pre-print by The American Journal of Gastroenterology is the first analysis of gastrointestinal symptoms reported by COVID-19 patients with mild disease rather than those with moderate or critical illness and finds a unique sub-group with low severity disease marked by presence of digestive symptoms, most notably diarrhea. The authors from Union Hospital and Tongji Medical College in Wuhan, China report that among some of the patients included in the study, these digestive symptoms, particularly diarrhea, were the presentation of COVID-19, and were only later, or never, present with respiratory symptoms or fever.

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Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How to Handle Groceries at Home

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 31, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Donald W. Schaffner is available for interviews on how to handle groceries safely

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China’s control measures may have prevented 700,000 COVID-19 cases

China’s control measures during the first 50 days of the COVID-19 epidemic may have delayed the spread of the virus to cities outside of Wuhan by several days and, by interrupting transmission nationwide, prevented more than 700,000 infections across the country, according to an international team of researchers.

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Individuals taking class of steroid medications at high risk for COVID-19

Individuals taking a class of steroid hormones called glucocorticoids for conditions such as asthma, allergies and arthritis on a routine basis may be unable to mount a normal stress response and are at high risk if they are infected with the virus causing COVID-19, according to a new editorial published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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First FDA-approved drug for thyroid eye disease effective regardless of age, gender

Teprotumumab, the first FDA-approved medicine for thyroid eye disease, provides significant improvement in eye bulging, regardless of patient gender, age or smoking status, according to a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors may lead to thyroid dysfunction

Thyroid dysfunction following cancer treatment with new treatments called immune checkpoint inhibitors is more common than previously thought, according to research that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Liraglutide can help adolescents with obesity manage their weight

Liraglutide 3.0 mg, approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity to help adults with obesity manage their weight, appears to help adolescents too, according to an industry-sponsored randomized controlled trial. The study was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a supplemental issue of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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Survey finds physicians struggle to communicate positive prognosis to thyroid cancer patients

Despite excellent prognosis with most thyroid cancers, many newly diagnosed patients have cancer-related worry, and physicians vary in their responses to patients’ worry, according to new research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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