How a Global Pandemic Changed the Way We Eat and Shop

Studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into how people ate, shopped and felt about food as the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded. Studying these trends can shed light on potential lingering health impacts of the pandemic and inform responses to future emergencies.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Coronavirus Risks a Year After Lockdowns Began

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 11, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Donald W. Schaffner is available for interviews on the likelihood of becoming infected by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus via shopping, groceries, surfaces and airborne/aerosol transmission after a year of lockdowns due to the global pandemic.…

As Stores Reopen, Which Customers Are Most Likely to Return? New research in MIT Sloan Review reveals how consumer preferences have changed and how retailers can adapt.

As Stores Reopen, Which Customers Are Most Likely to Return? New research reveals how consumer preferences have changed and how retailers can adapt. https://sloanreview-mit-edu.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/sloanreview.mit.edu/article/as-stores-reopen-which-customers-are-most-likely-to-return/amp Professors Patrick Lynch and Richard Ettenson available for commentary, analysis, and interviews. The COVID-19 pandemic and…

Q&A: What’s in store for retailers during a pandemic holiday season?

The 2020 holiday season, much like the majority of the year, will be like none other before. But what does this mean for retailers? Simone Peinkofer, assistant professor of supply chain management at Michigan State University’s Eli Broad College of Business, discusses what holiday consumerism may look like for consumers and retailers alike.

Don’t feel bad about purchasing non-essential items during COVID-19 crisis

Consumers should consider the likely economic and health consequence when purchasing non-essential items during the coronavirus pandemic, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. “Many people who can do so are making an…

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How to Handle Groceries at Home

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 31, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Donald W. Schaffner is available for interviews on how to handle groceries safely at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. “If you are concerned about the outside of food packages being contaminated, I suggest…

Consumer Stockpiling During COVID-19 Crisis Can Look Panicky, But It Has Its Rational Side

Consumers are clearing store shelves. Some observers call it “panic buying.” But a Johns Hopkins University expert on consumer behavior, while acknowledging that panic is an element of the phenomenon, says stockpiling can be seen as a rational approach to shopping during a pandemic.

Neighborhood Features and One’s Genetic Makeup Interact to Affect Cognitive Function

Few studies have examined how the neighborhood’s physical environment relates to cognition in older adults. Researchers categorized 4,716 individuals by apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype – a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) to determine if there are cognitive benefits of living in neighborhoods with greater access to social, walking and retail destinations. Results showed that the positive influence of neighborhood environments on cognition are strongest among those who are at the lowest risk for AD, specifically APOE ε2 carriers.