Plant virus plus immune cell-activating antibody clear colon cancer in mice, prevent recurrence

A new combination therapy to combat cancer could one day consist of a plant virus and an antibody that activates the immune system’s “natural killer” cells, shows a study by researchers at the University of California San Diego. In mouse models of colon cancer, the combination therapy eliminated all tumors and prevented their recurrence, which in turn resulted in 100% survival. The therapy also increased survival in mouse models of melanoma.

Computer Simulations of Proteins Help Unravel Why Chemotherapy Resistance Occurs

Understanding why and how chemotherapy resistance occurs is a major step toward optimizing treatments for cancer. A team of scientists including Markus Seeliger, PhD, of the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, believe they have found a new process through which drug resistance happens.

Existing Cancer Therapy in Narrow Use Shows Significant Activity against Other Cancers

A drug currently used in just 1% of cancers has significant potential against the remaining 99%, according to a new study from UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, published in the prestigious journal Nature Cancer. Ivosidenib, or AG-120, is currently used against cancers that have a mutation in the IDH1 gene. However, study results show that Ivosidenib is also effective against unmutated, or “wild-type” IDH1. The protein coded by the IDH1 gene in cancers helps cancer cells survive in a stressful tumor environment, so any inhibitor medication that could weaken this defense mechanism is considered a promising therapy. UH and CWRU scientists discovered that under conditions present in the tumor microenvironment, drugs previously believed to be selective for the mutant enzyme have activity against the normal protein. Specifically, low glucose and magnesium levels enhance drug activity. The team has now tested Ivosidenib in mouse models of pancreatic, colorectal, o

Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Announce Partnership with Costa Rica for CAR T Cell Therapy

Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), who together pioneered the research and development of the world’s first personalized cellular therapy for cancer — also known as CAR T cell therapy — have announced plans with Costa Rica’s CCSS, or the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (Social Security Program), to facilitate CAR T research in Costa Rica.

Capturing the Chemistry of Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Ruomei Gao

Ruomei Gao—an associate professor at SUNY College at Old Westbury—has been using facilities at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven Lab to investigate two primary processes of photosensitization for cancer therapy and prevention.

LUDWIG CANCER RESEARCH STUDY DISCOVERS HOW TO REVIVE POTENT BUT INERT ANTI-CANCER IMMUNE CELLS FOR THERAPY

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has discovered how to revive a powerful but functionally inert subset of anti-cancer immune cells that are often found within tumors for cancer therapy.

Led by Ludwig Lausanne’s Ping-Chih Ho and Li Tang of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the study describes how an immune factor known as interleukin-10 orchestrates the functional revival of “terminally exhausted” tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TILs), which have so far proved impervious to stimulation by immunotherapies. It also demonstrates that the factor, when applied in combination with cell therapies, can eliminate tumors in mouse models of melanoma and colon cancer. The findings are reported in the current issue of Nature Immunology.

Do You Know the Way to Berkelium, Californium?

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated how to image samples of heavy elements as small as a single nanogram. The new approach will help scientists advance new technologies for medical imaging and cancer therapies.

Memorial Cancer Institute Together with FAU Research Partnership Earn ‘Cancer Center of Excellence’ Designation

A research partnership formed just last year by Memorial Healthcare System and Florida Atlantic University is already being recognized for quality care, results, and advances in research, and that’s great news for patients fighting cancer in South Florida. The alliance between Memorial’s Cancer Institute and FAU (MCIFAU) has been recognized by the state’s Department of Health as a “Florida Cancer Center of Excellence.” It becomes just the fifth in the state, out of more than 80 competitors, to earn the designation.

Scientists Recruit New Atomic Heavyweights in Targeted Fight Against Cancer

Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new methods for the large-scale production, purification, and use of the radioisotope cerium-134, which could serve as a PET imaging radiotracer for a highly targeted cancer treatment known as alpha-particle therapy.

Tiny Nanospindles Enhance Use of Ultrasound to Fight Cancer

Ultrasound can be used to treat cancer when used in combination with molecules that sensitize the system to sound waves. These sonosensitizers generate toxic reactive oxygen species that attack and kill tumor cells. In Applied Physics Review, scientists report a new type of sonosensitizer based on a vanadium-doped titanium dioxide that enhances the amount of damage ultrasound inflicts on tumors. Studies in mice showed that tumor growth was markedly suppressed when compared to a control group.

MSK: Cancer Isn’t Sheltering in Place

As the height of the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City and the Tri-State area begins to subside, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center oncologists are urging patients to schedule cancer screenings and treatments now – as the long-term toll of missed diagnoses and delayed treatments could be devastating for patients and their loved ones across the region and the country.

Cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors may lead to thyroid dysfunction

Thyroid dysfunction following cancer treatment with new treatments called immune checkpoint inhibitors is more common than previously thought, according to research that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Investigational drugs block bone loss in mice receiving chemotherapy

Studying mice, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a driver of bone loss related to cancer treatment — cellular senescence. This process is independent of hormones related to bone health, such as estrogen. Such bone loss can be stopped by treating the mice with either of two investigational drugs already being evaluated in clinical trials.

Ultrasound Selectively Damages Cancer Cells When Tuned to Correct Frequencies

Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time. However, the therapeutic ultrasound used in clinics today indiscriminately damages cancer and healthy cells alike. Researchers have now developed a low-intensity ultrasound approach that exploits the properties of tumor cells to target them and provide a safer option. Their findings, reported in Applied Physics Letters, are a new step in oncotripsy, the singling out and killing of cancer cells based on their physical properties.

NUS researchers use light emitted from nanoparticles to intricately control biological processes

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have developed a method to give more control to optogenetics, by using specially designed nanoparticles and nanoclusters (dubbed ‘superballs’). These nanoparticles and superballs can emit different colours of light when excited by lasers at different wavelengths. These different colours of light can then be used to trigger specific biological processes.