Scientists Recruit New Atomic Heavyweights in Targeted Fight Against Cancer

Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new methods for the large-scale production, purification, and use of the radioisotope cerium-134, which could serve as a PET imaging radiotracer for a highly targeted cancer treatment known as alpha-particle therapy.

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Dana-Farber to present more than 40 research studies at 2020 ASH Annual Meeting

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers will present more than 40 research studies at the virtual 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting on December 5-8, including two studies that were selected for inclusion in the official press program.

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NUS researchers target ‘undercover’ gene that helps cancer cells proliferate

Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that little-known genes called “onco-requisite factors” can enlist other genes to assist them in helping cancer cells proliferate. The gene produces an enzyme called aldehyde dehydrogenase that recruits other enzymes to supply cancer cells with energy for growth. As such, depriving cells of aldehyde dehydrogenase may be a possible way to treat cancer.

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Young survivors of acute myeloid leukemia have long-term complications from treatment

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a high risk of developing several long-term health complications after treatment, a study led by UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found. The most common complications were cardiovascular, endocrine and respiratory diseases. The complications – known as late effects – were more present among non-white AYA patients and those living in more deprived neighborhoods.

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James K. McCloskey II, MD, Named Division Chief of the Division of Leukemia At Hackensack University Medical Center’s John Theurer Cancer Center

James K. McCloskey II, MD, was named division chief of the division of Leukemia at Hackensack Meridian John Theurer Cancer Center, part of Hackensack University Medical Center (JTCC). Dr. McCloskey previously served as the interim chief for the Division of Leukemia and will continue in his role as director for the Program for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms at John Theurer Cancer Center.

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Scientists kill cancer cells by “shutting the door” to the nucleus

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that blocking the construction of nuclear pores complexes—large channels that control the flow of materials in and out of the cell nucleus—shrank aggressive tumors in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed. The study, published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, reveals a new Achilles heel for cancer that may lead to better treatments for deadly tumors such as melanoma, leukemia and colorectal cancer.

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New NCCN Resource for Understanding Childhood Leukemia

NCCN publishes a new patient and caregiver resource focused on a childhood cancer type. Free NCCN Guidelines for Patients: Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) shares the latest expert advice for treating infants, children, and adolescents with the most common pediatric malignancy.

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MD Anderson and Astex Pharmaceuticals announce strategic collaboration to accelerate clinical evaluation of therapies for patients with leukemia

MD Anderson News Release September 08, 2020 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Astex Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., based in Tokyo, Japan, today announce a  strategic collaboration agreement aimed at accelerating the clinical evaluation of Astex’s pipeline of products for patients with certain types of leukemia, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

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New Insights Into Why People With Down Syndrome Are At Higher Risk For Leukemia

Scientists from Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago were the first to examine endothelial cells – one of the main sources of blood production – for clues as to why people with Down syndrome have higher prevalence of leukemia. They identified a new set of genes that are overexpressed in endothelial cells of patients with Down syndrome. This creates an environment conducive to leukemia, which is characterized by uncontrolled development and growth of blood cells. Their findings, published in the journal Oncotarget, point to new potential targets for treatment and possibly prevention of leukemia, in people with Down syndrome and in the general population.

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