Discovery in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Could Provide Novel Pathway for New Treatments

Researchers at Mount Sinai have discovered that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem cells are dependent on a transcription factor known as RUNX1, potentially providing a new therapeutic target to achieve lasting remissions or even cures for a disease in which medical advances have been limited.

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Combination therapy well-tolerated and highly effective for patients with IDH1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

A combination therapy of ivosenidib (IVO) plus venetoclax (VEN) with or without azacitidine (AZA) was found to be effective against a specific genetic subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a Phase Ib/II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The results of this trial may support a novel course of action for patients with AML harboring an IDH1 mutation who have historically had few treatment options.

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New High-Throughput Method to Study Gene Splicing at an Unprecedented Scale Reveals New Details About the Process

Genes are like instructions, but with options for building more than one thing. Daniel Larson, senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute, studies this gene “splicing” process, which happens in normal cells and goes awry in blood cancers like leukemia.

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CD19 CAR NK-cell therapy achieves 73% response rate in patients with leukemia and lymphoma

According to results from a Phase I/IIa trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with cord blood-derived chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) natural killer (NK)-cell therapy targeting CD19 resulted in clinical responses in a majority of patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no major toxicities observed.

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Cancer study may accidentally help researchers create usable blood stem cells

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows healthy form of the leukemia-causing gene MLL may push pluripotent stem cells (which have proven difficult to use in human patients) to become durable hematopoietic stem cells (which are usable in patients, but have until now been impossible to make).

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Elevated Leukemia Incidence Is Found in World Trade Center Rescue and Recovery Workers

Responders who worked at the World Trade Center site after the attacks on September 11, 2001, have an increased overall cancer incidence compared to the general population, particularly in thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, and, for the first time ever reported, leukemia, according to a Mount Sinai study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum in January.

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