Could leak in blood-brain barrier cause poor memory?

One of the keys to having a healthy brain at any age is having a healthy blood-brain barrier, a complex interface of blood vessels that run through the brain. Research shows the blood-brain barrier leaks as we age, and we lose cells called pericytes. But could this leak and the difficulties in recall be the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease?

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Study: Treatable Sleep Disorder Common in People with Thinking and Memory Problems

Obstructive sleep apnea is when breathing is repeatedly interrupted during sleep. Research has shown people with this sleep disorder have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. Yet, it is treatable. A preliminary study released today, February 28, 2021, has found that obstructive sleep apnea is common in people with cognitive impairment. The study will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021.

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People with Depression, Anxiety May Develop Alzheimer’s at Younger Age

Having depression is known to increase your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Now a new, preliminary study released today, February 24, 2021, reports that if people do develop Alzheimer’s disease, those with depression may start experiencing dementia symptoms about two years earlier than those who do not have depression. People with anxiety who develop Alzheimer’s may start experiencing dementia symptoms about three years earlier than those who do not have anxiety, according to the study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021.

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Press and Media Registration is Open for 2021 AAN Annual Meeting

No matter where you are in the world, the 2021 AAN Annual Meeting is one click away. Journalists can now register to attend the 73rd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) being held virtually April 17-22, 2021. The AAN Annual Meeting is the world’s largest gathering of neurologists who come together to share the latest advances in neurologic research.

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New Report Estimates 10,000 People 65 and Older Living with Dementia in the Nation’s Capital

A report released today estimates that about 10,000 Washington, D.C. residents 65 and older are living with dementia, a general term for a range of memory loss disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease.

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Protein That Can Be Toxic in The Heart And Nerves May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s

A protein that wreaks havoc in the nerves and heart when it clumps together can prevent the formation of toxic protein clumps associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a new study led by a UT Southwestern researcher shows. The findings, published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to new treatments for this brain-ravaging condition, which currently has no truly effective therapies and no cure.

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Longitudinal Study of Brain Aging and Cognitive Change Receives $19 Million Grant

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues elsewhere, will receive almost $19 million over five years for the fourth phase of the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging, which investigates cognition, aging and the risk for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

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New UNLV Center Advances Global Fight Against Alzheimer’s

The UNLV department of brain health has formally launched the Chambers-Grundy Center for Transformative Neuroscience, offering hope through scientific discovery for patients who are suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia and other brain and neurological diseases. The Center is the latest in a series of milestones from the department of brain health and the School of Integrated Health Sciences to better understand how a healthy brain functions, to improve care and treatment of people with brain diseases, and to identify mechanisms of brain disorders.

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Mayo Clinic research discovers a molecular switch for repairing central nervous system disorders

A molecular switch has the ability to turn on a substance in animals that repairs neurological damage in disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS), Mayo Clinic researchers discovered.

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Objective Subtle Cognitive Difficulties Predict Amyloid Accumulation and Neurodegeneration

Researchers report that accumulating amyloid protein occurred faster among persons deemed to have “objectively-defined subtle cognitive difficulties” (Obj-SCD) than among persons considered to be “cognitively normal,” offering a potential new early biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease.

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Better Biosensor Technology Created for Stem Cells

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and other neurological disorders. The technology, which features a unique graphene and gold-based platform and high-tech imaging, monitors the fate of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons), according to a study in the journal Nano Letters.

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New Research Confirms the Importance of Collecting Country-Specific Cost Data in the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR, announced today the publication of an analysis showing that direct medical costs are the major cost driver of Alzheimer’s disease care in Thailand, a finding distinct from other countries across the world.

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