Mayo Clinic researchers develop test to measure effect of breast cancer gene variants

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have combined results from a functional test measuring the effect of inherited variants in the BRCA2 breast and ovarian cancer gene with clinical information from women who received genetic testing to determine the clinical importance of many BRCA2 variants of uncertain significance (VUS). The findings were published today in a study in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Study Identifies Never-Before-Seen Dual Function in Enzyme Critical for Cancer Growth

In developing therapies for hard-to-treat breast and ovarian cancers in patients with BRCA gene mutations, scientists aim to identify ways to keep cancer cells from using DNA break repair pathways. New findings demonstrate a previously-unknown capability for polymerase theta (pol theta) – a key enzyme in this repair function – that shows promise as a new avenue for treatment development.

Wistar Scientists Discover Link Between a Genetic Driver of Ovarian Cancer and Metabolism, Opening the Way for New Therapeutic Strategies

Wistar scientists found mutations that inactivate the ARID1A gene in ovarian cancer increase utilization of the glutamine amino acid making cancer cells dependent on glutamine metabolism. Researchers also showed that pharmacologic inhibition of glutamine metabolism may represent an effective therapeutic strategy for ARID1A-mutant ovarian cancer.

Ovarian Cancer Screening Study Focuses on Early Detection in Women at Low Risk

Atlantic Health System is enrolling women in a landmark study that uses a simple blood test for the CA-125 protein to screen women who are at low risk for ovarian cancer. The purpose of the clinical trial is to help determine whether this test can catch ovarian cancer early in women who would not normally be screened for it. Atlantic Health System hospitals are the only centers in the New York metro region to participate in the study, and have the third highest enrollment numbers in the nation.

Cancer Research Institute Goes Virtual for Its Immunotherapy Patient Summit Series, Connecting Patients and Caregivers with Leading Experts in Cancer Immunotherapy

Free virtual event October 2-3 connecting cancer patients and caregivers with leading immunotherapy experts and patient advocates treated with immunotherapy

What Every Woman Should Know About Preventing Gynecologic Cancers

The best defense against gynecologic cancer starts with preventative measures. When cancer is detected early, there is a better chance of having more effective treatment and better outcomes. While there is not a single screening test for all gynecologic cancers, learn about the ones that do exist.

Cancer, COVID and the Kentucky Economy: How ‘Sweet Annie’ Could Make an Impact

Used as a medicinal herb for centuries, Artemisia annua contains powerful compounds that make it a popular treatment for malaria. But with lab research showing these compounds may help treat a variety of cancers and even COVID-19, this plant is more relevant than ever — and UK is showing how we can take it from Kentucky fields to the research lab to our patients.

Latest developments on Cytoreductive Surgery & Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (CRT/HIPEC)

Mercy Medical Center is the first institution in the United States to study the role of CRS/HIPEC for newly diagnosed with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancers. Literature exists involving CRS/HIPEC in the role of recurrent disease and in the neoadjuvant setting; however, there is no published data on the role as a primary treatment option in the United States.

Grounded in Science

Doctors face a difficult decision when they must choose a drug combination that will benefit the person sitting before them in an exam room. Statistics can’t show how any one person will respond to a reatment.works in people. Dr. Sarah Adams is using a $1.2M to find better ways to predict which women will benefit from her drug combination, now in clinical trials.

Study Examines Genetic Testing in Diverse Young Breast Cancer Patients over a Decade

Researchers examined racial and ethnic differences in genetic testing frequency and results among diverse breast cancer patients diagnosed at age 50 or younger from January 2007 to December 2017. They found that among 1,503 diverse young breast cancer patients, less than half (46.2 percent) completed hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genetic testing. However, the percentage of women who completed genetic testing increased over time from 15.3 percent in 2007 to a peak of 72.8 percent in 2015.

Updated Genetic Screening Guidelines Published by National Comprehensive Cancer Network Feature Emerging Evidence on Personalized Medicine

NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial Risk Assessment: Breast, Ovarian, and Pancreatic updated with new and expanded sections on risk assessment and management related to three major cancer types.

Cedars-Sinai Team Saves Life of Patient with 25-Pound Ovarian Tumor

DISMISSED WOMEN: For eight months, Maria’s doctors dismissed her pain, bloating, vomiting, hair loss and fatigue as the result of her “getting fatter,” and told her she needed to lose weight. Eventually a primary care physician in her home town sent her to the Cedars-Sinai Emergency Department where diagnostic imaging revealed a 25-pound cancerous, ovarian tumor. Maria credits Cedars-Sinai staff with saving her life because “they listened to me.”

A simpler way to make some medicines

Organic chemists have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs – including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer – are produced. Their discovery, published today in the journal Chem, gives drug makers a crucial building block for creating medicines that, so far, are made with complex processes that result in a lot of waste.

PARP inhibitor plus chemotherapy improves progression-free survival for advanced ovarian cancer patients

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported study results showing that initial treatment with the PARP inhibitor veliparib in combination with chemotherapy significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with newly diagnosed, metastatic high-grade serous ovarian cancer, according to the results of the VELIA trial.