Atlantic Health System Physicians Co-Author 5 Studies, Presented at American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting

Atlantic Health System Cancer Care physicians are co-authors of five original studies presented at this year’s AACR Annual Meeting, held virtually April 10-15 and May 17-21. The AACR meeting is one of the world’s premier scientific gatherings of cancer specialists and researchers.

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A clue to how some fast-growing tumors hide in plain sight

Viruses churn out genetic material in parts of the cell where it’s not supposed to be. Cancer cells do too. A new study shows that a tumor-suppressor enzyme called DAPK3 is an essential component of a multi-protein system that senses misplaced genetic material in tumor cells, and slows tumor growth by activating the fierce-sounding STING pathway.

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New immunotherapy target discovered for malignant brain tumors

Scientists say they have discovered a potential new target for immunotherapy of malignant brain tumors, which so far have resisted the ground-breaking cancer treatment based on harnessing the body’s immune system. The discovery, reported in the journal CELL, emerged from laboratory experiments and has no immediate implications for treating patients.

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Houston Methodist using 3D technology, artificial intelligence and more in new breast cancer research studies

Trials include a model to create custom breast implants, a smarter method to recommend biopsy, a novel approach to preserve sensation in implant-based breast reconstruction, and a new clinical trial investigating a modified herpes virus as a tactic to trigger immune response.

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Effective Cancer Immunotherapy Further Linked To Regulating A Cell ‘Suicide’ Gene

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a gene responsible for turning off a cell’s natural “suicide” signals may also be the culprit in making breast cancer and melanoma cells resistant to therapies that use the immune system to fight cancer. A summary of the research, conducted with mice and human cells, appeared Aug. 25 in Cell Reports.

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Three Women Scientists at Johns Hopkins Tapped to Join Exclusive Research Network

Three Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists are among the first 45 members selected to join the 10x Genomics Visium Clinical Translational Research Network (CTRN), aimed at advancing translational research in some of the world’s leading health problems, including oncology, immuno-oncology, neuroscience, infectious disease, inflammation and fibrosis, and COVID-19.

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Roswell Park’s Dr. Pawel Kalinski to Lead $14.5M NCI-Funded Immunotherapy Effort

A team led by Pawel Kalinski, MD, PhD, of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has earned a five-year, $14.54 million award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to expand a promising immunotherapy platform. Funded through the NCI’s Program Project Grant program, this prestigious five-year grant will fund five clinical trials, all focused on a strategy for making some of the most common immunotherapies work for more cancer patients.

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Immunotherapy using ‘young cells’ offers promising option against cancer

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the age of certain immune cells used in immunotherapy plays a role in how effective it is. These cells — natural killer (NK) cells — appear to be more effective the earlier they are in development, opening the door to the possibility of an immunotherapy that would not utilize cells from the patient or a matched donor. Instead, they could be developed from existing supplies of what are called human pluripotent stem cells.

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GW Cancer Center Expands Clinical Trial Offerings for Patients with High Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

The Cutaneous Oncology Program at the GW Cancer Center was selected as the first global site for a clinical trial for patients with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The study, sponsored by Regeneron, will examine outcomes for patients treated with Libtayo® (cemiplimab) — an immunotherapy treatment — prior to surgery and radiation therapy.

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John Theurer Cancer Center Participating in Early-Phase Study of Immunotherapy-Boosting Treatment

Investigators at John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey are participating in a first-in-patients clinical trial assessing VE800, a novel bacteria-containing therapy, in combination with the immunotherapy drug nivolumab. Laboratory research has suggested that VE800 may enhance the effectiveness of drugs like nivolumab.

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Study Examines Kidney Injury in Patients Taking Immunotherapy Cancer Medications

In patients taking immune checkpoint inhibitors as a treatment for cancer, 17% experienced acute kidney injury (AKI), 8% experienced sustained AKI, and 3% had potential immune checkpoint inhibitor–related AKI.
• Use of proton pump inhibitors, which are commonly used to treat stomach ulcers or acid reflux, was associated with a higher risk of experiencing sustained AKI.

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NUS scientist designs ‘express courier service’ for immune cells

Dr Andy Tay, a researcher with the National University of Singapore (NUS) who is currently doing his post-doctoral training at Stanford University, has successfully invented a novel transfection method to deliver DNA into immune cells with minimal stress on these cells. This new technique is expected to boost DNA-based cancer immunotherapy by significantly improving the process of generating high-quality genetically modified immune cells.

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