For Grassland Soil Viruses, Precipitation Shapes Diversity, Abundance, and Function

As precipitation patterns shift in response to climate change, scientists must understand how this change affects soil viruses. In this study, scientists analyzed DNA viruses in three grassland soils with different historical precipitation patterns: low precipitation from eastern Washington, intermediate precipitation from Kansas, and high precipitation from Iowa. The researchers found that viruses were more diverse and more common in drier soil.

Physicians urged to consider fungal infections as possible cause for lung inflammation

UC Davis Health infectious diseases expert George Thompson warns of the rising threat and apparent spread of disease-causing fungi outside their traditional hot spots. Fungal lung infections are commonly misdiagnosed, leading to delays in treatment and increase in antimicrobial resistance in the community.

Review: Are Climate Change and Air Pollution Making Neurologic Diseases Worse?

People with neurologic diseases like headache, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s disease may experience worsening symptoms due to climate change, according to a scoping review of research published in the November 16, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

PPPL awarded more than $12 million to speed development of a fusion pilot plant

The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded PPPL funding of more than $12 million to work with laboratories around the world to accelerate the development of a pilot plant powered by the carbon-free fusion energy that drives the sun and stars and can counter climate change.

New Critical Period of Embryonic Sex Determination in Sea Turtles Identified

A study shows that the temperature of the incubation environment could influence the sexualization of the gonads (reproductive organs) in sea turtles earlier than what is currently recognized. Researchers developed a new way to integrate the effect of thermal fluctuations on embryonic sex determination and predict sex ratios with much better accuracy than prior models. By measuring the strength of masculinization or feminization of temperatures using novel parameters, they have uncovered how temperature-sensitive sex determination works. These findings could be similar for other reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination because similar molecular determinants and enzymatic mechanisms are at play.

New center empowers climate storytellers across the communications landscape

USC Annenberg launched the Center for Climate Journalism and Communication to empower journalists and communications professionals to understand climate science, to capture its effects, particularly when felt disproportionately in under-resourced communities, and to drive action that preserves the health of our planet.

GW Experts Presenting at COP27 on “Eco-Smart Inclusive Governance” and Solar Cooking

GW faculty and students will be presenting at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt which runs from Nov. 6-18.  On Nov. 17, GW participants will present their research findings during a panel titled “Eco-Smart Inclusive…

Does racial resentment motivate confidence in false beliefs?

A new study in Social Science Quarterly found that racial resentment plays a strong role in leading Americans to express confidence in misinformed beliefs about policy issues associated with race or evaluated through racial lenses—such as human-caused climate change or the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic—but not on less racialized issues—such as the safety of childhood vaccines.

Blind spots in the monitoring of plastic waste

Whether in drinking water, food or even in the air: plastic is a global problem – and the full extent of this pollution may go beyond of what we know yet. Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with partners from the Netherlands and Australia, have reviewed conventional assumptions for the transport of plastic in rivers.

Experts on sustainability, environmental management, land use policy and climate change at Indiana University are available to comment on the 2022 U.N. Climate Summit, COP27.

BLOOMINGTON and INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – The United Nations’ annual climate summit, the 27th Conference of the Parties, or COP27, has convened in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt through Nov. 18 to discuss the global response to climate change. Major topics under discussion…

Blind spots in the monitoring of plastic waste

Whether in drinking water, food or even in the air: plastic is a global problem – and the full extent of this pollution may go beyond of what we know yet. Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with partners from the Netherlands and Australia, have reviewed conventional assumptions for the transport of plastic in rivers.

Dissecting the Ecology of Microalgae and Bacteria across Time and Space

Microalgae play an important role in the Earth’s climate, converting carbon dioxide into solid carbon. This research sought new ways to study these microalgae and their associated bacterial communities across time and space. The researchers created a new co-culture method called a “porous microplate” that passes nutrients and molecules associated with metabolism between culture cells while blocking physical contact between algae in adjacent wells.

Climate Change Double Whammy Causes Unexpected Effects in Pacific Mussels

Comparative physiologists studied how two aspects of climate change—warming temperatures and increasingly acidic waters—may affect the ecologically important Pacific blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus), a foundational species in the intertidal environments of the northern Pacific Ocean.

Math Model Shows Climate Change Puts Rainforest Animal’s Survival in Jeopardy

A South American marsupial with ties to an ancient line of animals may go extinct in the next half-century due to warming temperatures. Researchers from the Universidad Austral de Chile will present a mathematical model of the monito del monte’s survival predictions this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) Intersociety Meeting in Comparative Physiology: From Organism to Omics in an Uncertain World conference in San Diego.

It’s Not the Heat, It’s the Humidity: Water Loss Hurts Bees Most in the Desert

Digger bees lose large amounts of water during flight, which compromises their activity period and survival in the desert heat. Researchers from Arizona State University will present their work this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) Intersociety Meeting in Comparative Physiology: From Organism to Omics in an Uncertain World conference in San Diego.

What will it cost to cut the carbon footprint of cars sold in the U.S?

Argonne worked with automakers and energy companies to conduct a cradle-to-grave analysis of light-duty vehicles, which estimated the current and potential future costs and greenhouse gas emissions for vehicles over the entire course of their life cycle.

UCI study finds 53 percent jump in e-waste greenhouse gas emissions between 2014, 2020

Greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere from electronic devices and their associated electronic waste increased by 53 percent between 2014 and 2020, including 580 metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2020 alone, according to University of California, Irvine researchers.

Revelation and Resilience After Superstorm Sandy: Experts Discuss Extreme Weather, Hurricane Ida and Impact on Climate Change

Rutgers has resources, experts and stories on the impacts for any of your Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Ida and climate-related coverage. Please let me know if you’d like to speak with an expert or discuss work and research related to climate…