Romantic partners can influence each other’s beliefs and behaviors on climate change, new Yale study finds

Few would argue that romantic partners have the potential to shift each other’s beliefs and behaviors, but what about their views on climate change specifically? Up until now there’s been little analysis of the dynamics of climate change conversations in romantic relationships and how the beliefs of one partner can influence the other.

Climate change may be culprit in Antarctic fish disease outbreak

Climate change might be behind an unusual disease outbreak among Antarctic fish. For about a decade, University of Oregon biologists John Postlethwait and Thomas Desvignes have been visiting the West Antarctic Peninsula. They study a unique group of fish that has adapted to the harsh polar environment. But on a 2018 field excursion, they noticed something especially strange: a large number of those fish were afflicted with grotesque skin tumors.

Study led by NUS researchers reveals High Mountain Asia hydropower systems are threatened by climate change

High Mountain Asia, the planet’s most extensive icy systems outside the polar regions, have the world’s largest undeveloped hydropower potential and are seeing numerous dams and reservoirs under construction or planning. However, climate change is destabilising the landscapes and threatening numerous hydropower projects according to a new study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS).

Thin-film Photovoltaic Technology Combines Efficiency and Versatility

Stacking solar cells increases their efficiency. Working with partners in the EU-funded PERCISTAND project, researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have produced perovskite/CIS tandem solar cells with an efficiency of nearly 25 percent – the highest value achieved thus far with this technology. Moreover, this combination of materials is light and versatile, making it possible to envision the use of these tandem solar cells in vehicles, portable equipment, and devices that can be folded or rolled up. The researchers present their results in the journal ACS Energy Letters (DOI: 10.1021/acsenergylett.2c00707)

Experts available to discuss wildfire activity, ecosystem recovery and costs

With climate change leading to an increase in wildfires throughout the American Southwest, Northern Arizona University has a number of experts available to discuss the different facets of wildfires, forest health and restoration, and fire response. Ryan Fitch, assistant professor…

Investigating the Dynamics that Reshape Permafrost Environments

Researchers using monitoring data from Alaska permafrost found that vegetation and the snowpack that accumulates in winter control the temperatures below ground and thus the flow of water in the ground. By highlighting the link between above- and belowground properties and processes, these results will help improve scientists’ predictions of how the Arctic interacts with overall climate change.

ASA Annual Meeting, Aug. 5-9, Los Angeles; Press Registration Open

Sociologists to Explore Topics of Gun Violence, Policing, Housing Insecurity, Abortion Rights, and More at ASA Annual Meeting, Aug. 5-9, Los Angeles; Press Registration Open

New Tool Will Assess Water Discharge Impacts from Florida’s Everglades

An innovative tool will holistically examine and diagnose key processes with numerical simulations and experiments and predict changes in responses to water management, ecological restoration and climate change. It is designed to provide a suite of environmental and ecological information on the state of the greater Florida Bay ecosystem as well as potential future changes. Importantly, this model could potentially predict underwater aquatic vegetation coverage, harmful algal blooms, and fisheries resources under climate change and/or Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Program management scenarios.

UNH Research: Forest to Pasture – Keeping Trees Could Reduce Climate Consequences

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire studied a practice known as silvopasture which intentionally preserves trees in pastures where livestock graze. They found that compared to a completely cleared, tree-less, open pasture, the integrated silvopasture released lower levels of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide and soil carbon storage remained the same, offering a possible alternative for farmers with less climate consequences.

Philanthropist Stacey Nicholas pledges $3 million to School of Education

Irvine, Calif., June 13, 2022 — A $3 million gift from longtime University of California, Irvine supporter Stacey Nicholas will advance the School of Education’s ambitious projects for improving environmental and climate change literacy in California’s classrooms. The funding will create a new $2 million endowment fund for the Stacey Nicholas Endowed Chair in Environmental Education to support the teaching, research and service activities of the chair holder.

Rising temperatures may cause a rise in carbon dioxide, but this does not refute human-caused climate change

The rise in temperature before a rise in carbon dioxide has led some to conclude that carbon dioxide simply cannot be responsible for current global warming. We find this claim to be misleading because it fails to tell the whole story. Increasing CO2 levels can be the cause AND effect of further warming.

Including all types of emissions shortens timeline to reach Paris Agreement temperature targets

Instead of focusing on carbon dioxide’s effect on future temperature, new research includes the related human-generated emissions of methane, nitrogen oxide and particle pollution. Expanding the scope increases the amount of future warming that is already guaranteed by past emissions, and shortens the timeline to reach the Paris Agreement temperature targets.

Artificial Intelligence Analyzes Gut Microbiota of Fish to Detect Waters Compromised by Climate Change

Article title: Gut microbiota of wild fish as reporters of compromised aquatic environments sleuthed through machine learning Authors: John W. Turner Jr., Xi Cheng, Nilanjana Saferin, Ji-Youn Yeo, Tao Yang Bina Joe From the authors: “Overall, this study represents the…

How Can Changes to Urban Neighborhoods and Buildings Affect Microclimates and Energy Use?

Heating and cooling for buildings accounted for the United States’ biggest share (41 percent) of energy consumption in 2010, and energy use by buildings amounts to 40 percent of total U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. A new method allows researchers to test the design of neighborhoods and buildings to understand how they affect local and regional weather and energy use.