Climate Change Threatens Base of Polar Oceans’ Bountiful Food Webs

A study recently published in Nature Communications suggests that displacing cold-water communities of algae with warm-adapted ones threatens to destabilize the delicate marine food web. The team was led by University of East Anglia researchers and included DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers.

ORNL expertise supports latest IPCC report and efforts to understand, address climate change

Improved data, models and analyses from Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists and many other researchers in the latest global climate assessment report provide new levels of certainty about what the future holds for the planet and highlight the urgency of decarbonization to avoid the most severe impacts.

UCLA Experts Available for Comment on “A Year of Climate Action” Stemming From the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Experts, affiliated with FSPH’s UCLA Center for Healthy Climate Solutions, are available for comment on issues raised by the IPCC report: Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor of health policy and management and…

Climate Change from Nuclear War’s Smoke Could Threaten Global Food Supplies, Human Health

Nuclear war would cause many immediate fatalities, but smoke from the resulting fires would also cause climate change lasting up to 15 years that threatens worldwide food production and human health, according to a study by researchers at Rutgers University, the National Center for Atmospheric Research and other institutions.

Danforth Center and Salk plant researchers launch collaboration to breed carbon-capturing sorghum

Researchers at the Salk Institute’s Harnessing Plants Initiative have established a five-year, $6.2 million collaboration with Dr. Nadia Shakoor and her team at the Danforth Center to identify and develop sorghum plants that can better capture and store atmospheric carbon.

False spring: Climate change may erode frogs’ ability to withstand salt pollution

Climate change may erode frogs’ ability to withstand road salt pollution, according to researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Rutgers to Lead Regional Large-Scale Coastlines and People Megalopolitan Coastal Transformation Hub with Nearly $20M from National Science Foundation

Advancing its mission and leadership role to improve climate risk management critical to societal well-being, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey will lead a multi-university Megalopolitan Coastal Transformation Hub (MACH) made possible by a grant through the National Science Foundation’s Coastlines and People (CoPe) Program with expected total funding of $19.9+ million over the next five years.

ITEP releases report examining effects of climate change on Indigenous peoples, lands and culture

As the climate changes and land, air and water are at risk, Native Americans, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous peoples are seeing their water sources dry up and their land disappear under rising sea levels. under attack from rising global temperatures. Researchers at the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals brought together a diverse group of more than 100 authors to produce a first-of-its-kind report that provides an in-depth looks at what tribal nations are doing to protect against the climate crisis.

New Research Analyzes Millions of Twitter Posts During Hurricanes to Understand How People Communicate in a Disaster

In the face of a potentially disastrous storm like Hurricane Ida, people take to Twitter and other social media sites to communicate vital information. New research published in the journal Risk Analysis suggests that monitoring and analyzing this social media “chatter” during a natural disaster could help decision makers learn how to plan for and mitigate the impacts of severe weather events in their communities.

UNH Receives $1.8 Million Grant to Study Road Resilience to Sea Level Rise

After a summer of high heat, steady sea level rise and devastating hurricanes, coastal roads have continued to take a severe beating resulting in endless wear and tear. Because these roadways have become increasingly vulnerable, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has awarded a $1.8 million grant to researchers at the University of New Hampshire to study how and why coastal hazards like excessive flooding are causing roads to crack and crumble and find ways to protect them.

Developing Digital Twins for Improved Hurricane Prediction

UT’s Oden Institute will lead an interdisciplinary research project to develop a computational “digital twin” framework for storm surge modeling in the Gulf Coast that bridges the gap between multi-physics simulations and knowledge discovery through artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) technologies.

The history of insects living on the open ocean tracked with the history of the currents they ride

The open oceans are harsh and hostile environments where insects might not be expected to thrive. In fact, only one insect group, ocean skaters, or water striders, has adapted to life on the open seas.

How these insects evolved to conquer the high seas, however, was not known.

Now, a study of the genetics of skaters by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego provides a clue. The answer has to do with when major currents in the eastern Pacific Ocean came into existence with each species of skater evolving to match the unique conditions of those currents.

Prehistoric climate change repeatedly channelled human migrations across Arabia

Recent research in Arabia – a collaboration between scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, the Heritage Commission of the Saudi Ministry of Culture, and many other Saudi and international researchers – has begun to document the incredibly rich prehistory of Saudi Arabia, the largest country in Southwest Asia.

Warming Atlantic drives right whales towards extinction

Warming oceans have driven the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale population from its traditional and protected habitat, exposing the animals to more lethal ship strikes, disastrous commercial fishing entanglements and greatly reduced calving rates. Without improving its management, the right whale populations will decline and potentially become extinct in the coming decades, according to a Cornell- and University of South Carolina-led report in the journal Oceanography.

How cities can transform urban green spaces into carbon sinks – Expert available to comment on lessons learned from Helsinki pilot

Senior lecturer Mikko Jalas is available to comment on how cities can use biochar in urban green spaces to help reach carbon neutrality. Jalas has co-led efforts on Carbon Lane, a project to build and monitor an urban carbon sink…

Meeting biodiversity, climate, and water objectives through integrated strategies

Managing a strategically placed 30% of land for conservation could safeguard 70% of all considered terrestrial plant and vertebrate animal species, while simultaneously conserving more than 62% of the world’s above and below ground vulnerable carbon, and 68% of all clean water.

FAU Kicks Off Fall 2021 Virtual ‘Research in Action’ Series

“Research in Action” is a virtual weekly talk series on Zoom. Each week, participants can listen to experts in their fields as they present their latest research and participate in question-and-answer sessions.

The Health Implications of Climate Change: Emergency Medicine expert available

Caleb Dresser, MD, MPH, attending physician in Emergency Department, recent graduate of Fellowship in Climate and Human Health at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC)  Climate change and the extreme weather it brings, including heatwaves, hurricanes, and wildfires, impact not only land and infrastructure but human health as well. Through his work as an…

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and City University of New York Researchers Receive $14.5 Million NIH Grant to Lead HIV Studies in Central Africa

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNYSPH) have been awarded a five-year, $14.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue leading and expand their research on HIV treatment and care in five Central African nations.