Monogamous Female Sea Turtles? Yes, Thanks to Sperm Storage

Female sea turtles mate multiply to ensure fertilization. A study of nesting loggerhead female sea turtles in southwestern Florida used genotyping to uncover how many fathers were represented in their nests. Surprisingly, scientists found that 75 percent of the female sea turtles had mated singly. No male was represented in more than one female’s clutches. Findings provide insights into the relative numbers of males present in the breeding population, which are hard to get because males never come ashore.

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In Cuba, Cleaner Rivers Follow Greener Farming

For the first time in more than 50 years, a joint team of Cuban and U.S. field scientists studied the water quality of twenty-five Cuban rivers and found little damage after centuries of sugarcane production. They also found nutrient pollution in Cuba’s rivers much lower than the Mississippi River. Cuba’s shift to conservation agriculture after the collapse of the Soviet Union—and reduced use of fertilizers on cropland—may be a primary cause.

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Native Americans did not make large-scale changes to environment prior to European contact

Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research conducted in New England featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

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Local, Native Birds Declining Rapidly While Non-native, Invasive Species Thrive

When Israeli conservation scientists looked at trends of common bird populations over the last 15 years, they found that invasive bird species are thriving, and native ones are largely declining. They present the reasons for these changes, and flag the importance of strategies to mitigate the spread of non-native birds.

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