UCLA Fielding School Researchers Find Latino Californians of all Ages Among Hardest Hit by Pandemic

The COVID-19 surge of summer through winter 2020‒2021 devastated all population groups. Yet when the death rates of Latinos are compared to non-Hispanic white (NHW) rates in every age group, there is a significant disparity between the two: Latino death rates are from two to seven times higher than NHW rates.

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Sneak preview: New platform allows scientists to explore research environments virtually

The Department of Energy pledged $1.68 million to Argonne National Laboratory over three years so it can create a virtual platform or digital twin that will allow experimentalists to explore their proposed studies prior to visiting the labs.

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Media availability for energy experts to discuss carbon capture, storage and regulations for California

George Peridas, director of carbon management partnerships, and staff scientist Briana Schmidt from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will be available to discuss results from a new report titled “Permitting Carbon Capture and Storage in California” that examined the regulatory framework for authorizing carbon capture and storage in California and offers options for government and project developers to enable robust, transparent and efficient project permitting in line with the state’s goal to reach carbon neutrality by 2045 or earlier.

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Lab report outlines updates to state regulations for carbon capture and storage

To reach economy-wide carbon-neutrality by 2045 or earlier, California will likely have to capture, transport and geologically store tens of millions of tons per year of carbon dioxide (CO2) from large sources and from the atmosphere.

California has an extensive regulatory framework that is rigorous, robust and will safeguard the environment, public health and safety during these activities. However, this framework cannot handle the timely permitting and deployment of sufficient projects to protect the rapidly worsening climate and support achieving the state’s climate goals, according to a report by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

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Argonne National Laboratory climate model helps Pacific Gas and Electric Company combat climate change impacts, including wildfires

Scientists at Argonne developed a climate model that projects future conditions at neighborhood-level scale across the entire United States to help PG&E plan for extreme weather events in California.

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Fishes Contribute Roughly 1.65 Billion Tons of Carbon in Feces and Other Matter Annually

Scientists have little understanding of the role fishes play in the global carbon cycle linked to climate change, but a Rutgers-led study found that carbon in feces, respiration and other excretions from fishes – roughly 1.65 billion tons annually – make up about 16 percent of the total carbon that sinks below the ocean’s upper layers.

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Error Correction Means California’s Future Wetter Winters May Never Come

California and other areas of the U.S. Southwest may see less future winter precipitation than previously projected by climate models. After probing a persistent error in widely used models, PNNL researchers estimate that California will likely experience drier winters in the future than projected by some climate models, meaning residents may see less spring runoff, higher spring temperatures, and an increased risk of wildfire in coming years.

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Building a better traffic forecasting model

Researchers from Argonne have developed a new way to accurately forecast traffic and proved that it could work using as their model the California highway system, the busiest in the United States.

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Concerns about violence increase in California amid COVID-19 pandemic

A new study by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Program looked at the intersection of the coronavirus pandemic and violence-related harms in California. It found that COVID-19 pandemic was linked to an estimated 110,000 firearm purchases in California and increases in individuals’ worries about violence.

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Researchers Use Satellite Imaging to Map Groundwater Use in California’s Central Valley

Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California’s San Joaquin Valley.

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Some of America’s Favorite Produce Crops May Need to Get a Move On by 2045

New research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that by the years 2045-2049 future temperatures will have more of an effect on when cool-season crops, such as broccoli and lettuce, can be grown than on where, while for warm-season crops (cantaloupe, tomatoes, carrots) the impact will be greater for where they can be grown versus when.

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COVID-19: How South Korea Prevailed While the U.S. Failed

In a commentary, researchers demonstrate the stark differences in public health strategies from two democratic republics: South Korea and the United States, which have led to alarming differences in cases and deaths from COVID-19. After adjusting for the 6.5 fold differences in populations, the U.S. has suffered 47 times more cases and 79 times more deaths than South Korea.

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New technique allows scientists to measure mitochondrial respiration in frozen tissue

UCLA scientists have developed a method for restoring oxygen-consumption activity to previously frozen mitochondria samples. By speeding up research, investigators hope to accelerate the diagnosis of people living with mitochondrial diseases and secondary disorders in which mitochondria play a key role, including diseases related to aging, metabolism and the heart.

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Remarkable Grads from the Class of 2020

This spring, the California State University​ will award degrees to more than 100,000 students who come from all walks of life. These students embody some of the characteristics that make the CSU’s student body so remarkable: resiliency, integrity and an eagerness to use their education to lift up those who come after them.

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California State University Center to Close Achievements Gaps to Open at Cal State Long Beach

The California State University (CSU) announced today that California State University, Long Beach has been selected as the host site for the CSU Center to Close Achievement Gaps (CCAG). The center, set to open this spring, will focus on identifying and refining proven strategies to eliminate equity gaps at all levels of education and will share training, tools and evidence-based best practices with colleges of education across the CSU and education partners across California.

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Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance

CU Boulder researchers have developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. This would enable fisheries and communities that depend on seafood negatively affected by ocean acidification to adapt to changing conditions in real time, improving economic and food security in the next few decades.

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Rutgers Experts Can Discuss Food Shortages Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 21, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick experts William J. Bamka and Michelle Infante-Casella are available for interviews on food

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