UCI-led study shows Rhodiola rosea root might be beneficial for managing type 2 diabetes

A team of researchers led by the University of California, Irvine has discovered that treatment with an extract from the roots of the Rhodiola rosea plant might be effective for helping manage type 2 diabetes, showing promise as a safe and effective non-pharmaceutical alternative. The study, recently published online in Scientific Reports, found that in a mouse model of human type 2 diabetes, Rhodiola rosea lowered fasting blood sugar levels, improved response to insulin injections, modulated the composition of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and decreased several biomarkers of inflammation.

Lactating Mice Pass along Common Antimicrobial to Pups, Initiating Liver Damage

In mouse studies, UC San Diego researchers report that lactating mothers expose their feeding pups to triclosan, an antimicrobial commonly used in consumer products, resulting in early signs of liver damage.

Vitamin B5 May Help Weight Loss by Turning on Brown Fat

Pantothenate acid, also known as vitamin B5, stimulated the production of brown fat in both cell cultures and mice, a new study finds. “[B5] has therapeutic potential for treating obesity and type II diabetes,” researchers conclude. The study was chosen as an APSselect article for July.

New discoveries about enzyme’s metabolic role may lead to better diabetes treatments

For the first time, a team led by UAH, a part of the University of Alabama System, has characterized the metabolic function of a phosphatase enzyme called mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-2 (MKP-2), as well as the enzyme’s pathophysiology in obesity, Type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Vitamin D Supplements May Offset Bone Loss Caused by Diabetes Drug

Vitamin D supplementation may help offset damaging bone loss that occurs in some people who take canagliflozin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug. Researchers will present their work this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Addressing stress and postpartum symptoms early may reduce risk for type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes

Addressing stress early on in postpartum women who recently experienced gestational diabetes might help curb an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, according to research being presented Sunday, June 12 at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga.

High Availability of Fast-Food Restaurants Across All U.S. Neighborhood Types Linked to Higher Rates of Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Finds

A new nationwide study led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine published online today in JAMA Network Open suggests that living in neighborhoods with higher availability of fast-food outlets across all regions of the United States is associated with higher subsequent risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Personalized medicine research focuses on Hispanics with diabetes in South Texas

A team of researchers studying genetic data to identify hormone responses in a population of Mexican Americans with prediabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and obesity recently received a $3.5 million grant to fund a five-year study set to begin in late 2021.

Project to improve health equity in Indianapolis expands with funding from Lilly

Indiana University has received a five-year, $5 million grant from Eli Lilly and Co. to expand the Diabetes Impact Project, which aims to improve health equity in three Indianapolis neighborhoods where residents are predominantly people of color.

Do Some Diabetes Drugs Reduce the Risk of Alzheimer’s?

MINNEAPOLIS – People taking certain drugs to lower blood sugar for type 2 diabetes had less amyloid in the brain, a biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease, when compared to both people with type 2 diabetes not taking the drugs and people without diabetes. The new study, published in the August 11, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, also found people taking these drugs, called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, showed slower cognitive decline than people in the other two groups.

Frequent Breaks from Sitting May Improve Daily Blood Sugar Fluctuations

Frequent activity breaks from sitting may improve fasting blood sugar (glucose) levels and stabilize daily fluctuations, according to new research. The study, the first of its length to explore the effects of activity breaks in “free-living” conditions, is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism. It was chosen as an APSselect article for August.

Association between COVID-19 exposure, self-reported compliance with public health guidelines among essential employees at an institution of higher education

What The Study Did: This study at an institution of higher education in Colorado evaluated the association between self-reported protective behaviors and how common SARS-CoV-2 infection was among essential in-person employees during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic…

July/August 2021 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet

Primary Care Poised to Provide Clinical Guidance, Answers About COVID-19 Testing, Vaccine Administration Researchers examined the role of primary care physicians and other clinicians in delivering vaccinations in the United States. They used two main datasets to create an in-depth…