Visual Abstract: Standard vs Enhanced Self-Measurement of Blood Pressure Paired With Smartphone Application

  Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release. A visual abstract is below. Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.3355?guestAccessKey=fd9d8a9c-2d02-4b28-9e0d-0e4b4c9afdf9&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=081522   Visual Abstract…

Journal of Medical Internet Research | Blood Pressure Monitoring, a Digital Tool for Diabetes

JMIR Publications recently published “Blood Pressure Monitoring as a Digital Health Tool for Improving Diabetes Clinical Outcomes: Retrospective Real-world Study” in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), which reported that there is a lack of understanding of the association between blood glucose (BG) and blood pressure (BP) levels when using digital health tools.

Increased heart disease risk from red meat may stem from gut microbe response to digestion

Chemicals produced in the digestive tract by gut microbes after eating red meat may help explain part of the higher risk of cardiovascular disease associated with red meat consumption, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association’s peer-reviewed journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology (ATVB).

Common Prebiotic Fiber Mitigates Harm of High-salt Diet in Rats

New research in rats finds a diet high in the fiber inulin offered a protective effect against the damage of a high-salt diet. The research will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference

Five New Studies Examine Eating Behaviors in Teens and Young Adults

The developmental changes and growing independence that characterize adolescence and young adulthood can make these stages of life both exciting and challenging. New studies at NUTRITION 2022 LIVE ONLINE shed light on the eating behaviors and diets of teens and young adults around the world.

Exercise Improves Health Markers in Young Female Survivors of Childhood Trauma

New research shows a progressive exercise training program mitigates some physiological and psychological effects of adverse childhood experiences in otherwise healthy young women. The study will be presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Stress-relief Music Therapy Can Also Effectively Relieve Pain

Medical results show that music therapy can lower blood pressure, relieve pain during chemotherapy and dialysis, as well as stimulate the elderly brain. The Faculty of Fine and Applied Arts, Chulalongkorn University is offering a Music Therapy Program aiming to heal the ever-increasing patients with various chronic diseases in society.

Saving Lives in Black Barbershops

A new look at data from a landmark Cedars-Sinai study of health interventions in Black barbershops, and a new study that looks at barbershop patrons’ virtual visits with pharmacists, have added to the evidence that convenient, community-based health programs can cost-effectively control high blood pressure and prevent heart attack and stroke.

Most Americans Are Not Getting Enough Fiber in Our Diets

Only 5% of men and 9% of women are getting the recommended daily amount of dietary fiber, according to a study being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. Insufficient fiber intake is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, two of the most common diseases in the U.S.

Exercise to Improve Health: Fast, Furious and Infrequent or Slow, Steady and Sustainable?

Exercise is well-known to reduce the risk of chronic diseases like hypertension, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. While moderate-intensity continuous exercise (END) has traditionally been recommended to achieve these meaningful benefits, the time-effective alternative of sprint interval training (SIT)…

Final results of SPRINT study confirm controlling blood pressure critically important in preventing heart disease and stroke

News release about the follow-up data from the landmark SPRINT study of the effect of high blood pressure on cardiovascular disease have confirmed that aggressive blood pressure management — lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mm Hg — dramatically reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, and death from these diseases, as well as death from all causes, compared to lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mm Hg.

Announcing Virtual Press Conference for Experimental Biology 2021 Meeting

Reporters are invited to join a live Q&A discussion of exciting research announcements at the forefront of the life sciences during a virtual press conference for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting. The press conference will be held online from 1–1:45 p.m. EDT on Monday, April 26, 2021 (RSVP by Friday, April 23).

Alcohol Plus Cadmium (via Smoking) Can Amplify Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk

Heavy drinking combined with cadmium exposure — most commonly via smoking — escalates the risk of hypertension, according to a new study. Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects 26 percent of the global population and is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Alcohol consumption and cadmium exposure are known risk factors for hypertension. Exposure to cadmium, a metal that accumulates in body organs, occurs mainly through smoking, which often accompanies heavy drinking. Other cadmium sources include certain foods, air pollution, and wine and beer. Alcohol increases the absorption of cadmium in the body, and evidence suggests that the two substances contribute to hypertension via shared physiological pathways. The new study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, is the first known epidemiological investigation of the combined effects of alcohol and cadmium on blood pressure.

Effectiveness of HIIE versus MICT in Improving Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Health and Disease

A healthy lifestyle is composed primarily of regular structured physical activity (i.e., exercise). As a result, there is vast research into the clinical benefits of exercise, in most cases showing a better effect than drug interventions. Current physical activity guidelines…

Study Links Intensive Blood Pressure Lowering to Reduced Cardiovascular Risk in Patients Exposed to High Levels of Air Pollution

In a new study published this week in the journal Hypertension, researchers at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine found intensive BP lowering is effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients exposed to high levels of air pollution.

Heart Disease and COVID-19: Focusing on Exercise, Mental Health, and Nutrition are Critical for High-Risk Groups

February is American Heart Month and cardiologists from the Mount Sinai Health System are sharing tips on heart disease prevention to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and COVID-19.

Sleep Apnea Does Not Raise Blood Pressure in Young Women

Article title: Sex differences in integrated neuro-cardiovascular control of blood pressure following acute intermittent hypercapnic-hypoxia Authors:Dain W. Jacob, Elizabeth P. Ott, Sarah E. Baker, Zachariah M. Scruggs, Clayton L. Ivie, Jennifer L. Harper, Camila M. Manrique-Acevedo, Jaqueline K. Limberg From…

Could Arm Squeezes with Blood Pressure Cuffs Help the Brain Recover After Stroke?

People who are given clot-busting drugs after a stroke may recover better if they also are given a therapy called remote ischemic postconditioning, according to a new study published in the October 7, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote ischemic conditioning is when blood flow, and the oxygen it carries, is stopped and then restored repeatedly by blood pressure cuffs worn on the arms.

Mindfulness with Paced Breathing and Lowering Blood Pressure

Now more than ever, Americans and people all over the world are under increased stress, which may adversely affect their health and well-being. Researchers explore the possibility that mindfulness with paced breathing reduces blood pressure. One of the most plausible mechanisms is that paced breathing stimulates the vagus nerve and parasympathetic nervous system, which reduce stress chemicals in the brain and increase vascular relaxation that may lead to lowering of blood pressure.

Is L-citrulline Supplementation Combined with Exercise Training an Effective Strategy to Improve Vascular and Muscular Function in Older Adults?

Aging is associated with increased risk of high blood pressure, an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and loss of muscle fitness (i.e., mass, strength and exercise capacity). Endothelial cells lining the wall of blood vessels maintain normal blood pressure…

OMRON Healthcare and Mount Sinai Health System Collaborate to Help High-Risk Patients Monitor Their Blood Pressure from Home with VitalSight

• Ensures close connection between patient and physician for remote hypertension monitoring
• Complements Mount Sinai’s growing telehealth initiative
• Medicare-covered and generally at no cost to patients, depending on coverage

How Do Commonly Used Blood Pressure Medications Affect Outcomes Among Patients with COVID-19?

A new international trial will evaluate whether the use of medications to treat high blood pressure affect outcomes among patients who are prescribed the medication and hospitalized with COVID-19. Investigators will examine whether ACEI or ARBs help to mitigate complications or lead to worse outcomes.

Could High Blood Pressure at Night Have an Effect on Your Brain?

Most people’s blood pressure goes down during the night, which doctors call “dipping.” But for some people, especially those with high blood pressure, their nighttime pressure stays the same or even goes up, called “reverse dipping.” A new study shows that people with high blood pressure and reverse dipping may be more likely to have small areas in the brain that appear damaged from vascular disease and associated memory problems. The study is published in the April 15, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Chemicals used to replace BPA may lead to increased blood pressure

Common bisphenol A (BPA) substitutes can affect the developing fetus and cause hypertension in later life, suggests a rodent study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting. The research will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

The fat around your arteries may actually keep them healthy

A Michigan State University researcher is adding new evidence to the argument that the fat around our arteries may play an important role in keeping those blood vessels healthy.

The finding could affect how researchers test for treatments related to plaque buildup in our arteries, or atherosclerosis, an issue that can often lead to a heart attack, which is currently a leading cause of death in the United States.