MEASURING BLOOD DAMAGE

Red blood cells sometimes rupture when blood is sent through faulty equipment, such as a dialysis machine. This is called hemolysis. Hemolysis also can occur during blood work when blood is drawn too quickly through a needle, leading to defective laboratory samples. University of Delaware mechanical engineer Tyler Van Buren and collaborating colleagues at Princeton University have developed a method to monitor blood damage in real-time.

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Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Stroke-Prevention Among Patients Undergoing Dialysis

• Among patients with kidney failure and atrial fibrillation, Black, Hispanic White, and Asian patients filled prescriptions of stroke-preventive medications less often than non-Hispanic White patients, and they were more likely to experience stroke.
• Equalizing the distribution of these medications would prevent 7%–12% of the stroke disparity among racial/ethnic minorities.

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New Robot Does Superior Job Sampling Blood

In the future, robots could take blood samples, benefiting patients and healthcare workers alike. A Rutgers-led team has created a blood-sampling robot that performed as well or better than people, according to the first human clinical trial of an automated blood drawing and testing device.

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How Do Outcomes for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Differ in Patients Treated with Long-Term Dialysis?

• Among patients who experience cardiac arrest while in the hospital, those on dialysis were less likely to have a shockable rhythm and more likely to be outside of the intensive care unit at the time of arrest compared with patients not on dialysis.
• Patients on dialysis had lower scores for resuscitation quality, and they were less likely to have defibrillation within 2 minutes.
• Patients on dialysis had a similar likelihood of surviving to hospital discharge, and they had better neurological function at the time of discharge.

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Peritoneal Dialysis Use Has Increased in the United States after Medicare Payment Reform

• After a Medicare payment policy related to dialysis was implemented in 2011, use of home-based peritoneal dialysis increased significantly.
• Increases were seen for both “early” and “late” peritoneal dialysis: more patients initiated dialysis with peritoneal dialysis and more patients switched from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis.

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Simulations Characterize Turbulence Caused by Common Connection for Dialysis

The complex interplay among the arteriovenous grafts, the vessels they connect, and the blood they transport has been difficult to simulate with computers, but one new method provides a way. Researchers report in Physics of Fluids on a series of simulations that reconstructed the fluid dynamics affected by the insertion of an AVG.

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