New $3 million National Science Foundation center aims to connect materials data science research to industry

Case Western Reserve University and the University of Pittsburgh will launch a joint center this fall that uses cutting edge data-science and materials research to help companies make more reliable and durable products.

The Center for Materials Data Science for Reliability and Degradation (MDS-Rely) is a $3 million center supported by a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) .

Bubbling to the surface: WVU engineers develop new geothermal energy technology

As part of the American-Made Geothermal Manufacturing Prize competition, a challenge designed to spur innovation and address manufacturing challenges in geothermal environments, associate professor Terence Musho and Berry Chair Emeritus Nigel Clark in West Virginia University’s Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, have developed a new airlift approach to optimize current geothermal pump technologies.

‘Artificial Chemist’ Combines AI, Robotics to Conduct Autonomous R&D

Researchers have developed a technology called “Artificial Chemist,” which incorporates artificial intelligence and an automated system for performing chemical reactions to accelerate R&D and manufacturing of commercially desirable materials.

MAGNET Delivers Improved COVID-19 Testing Platform in Partnership with University Hospitals and the Ohio Manufacturing Alliance

The Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network (MAGNET), in collaboration with University Hospitals and The Ohio Manufacturing Alliance to Fight COVID-19, has developed a new, protective testing platform for health care workers assessing the spread of COVID-19. Health care experts at University Hospitals and UH Ventures, their innovation and commercialization division, believe these specially designed barriers could decrease the need for valuable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), speed up the testing process, and better protect frontline health care workers.

Liquid metal research invokes ‘Terminator’ film — but much friendlier

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed “the first liquid metal lattice in the world.” The team has created a series of prototypes that return to their shapes when crushed.

A Great New Way to Paint 3D-Printed Objects

Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create “smart skins” for printed parts. The findings are published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Nature might be better than tech at reducing air pollution

Adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 percent, new research suggests.

The study shows that plants – not technologies – may also be cheaper options for cleaning the air near a number of industrial sites, roadways, power plants, commercial boilers and oil and gas drilling sites.

In fact, researchers found that in 75 percent of the counties analyzed, it was cheaper to use plants to mitigate air pollution than it was to add technological interventions – things like smokestack scrubbers – to the sources of pollution.

ORNL develops, deploys AI capabilities across research portfolio

To accelerate promising artificial intelligence applications in diverse research fields, ORNL has established a labwide AI Initiative. This internal investment brings the lab’s AI expertise, computing resources and user facilities together to facilitate analyses of massive datasets.