Low-dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend against taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes for most people. The Oct. 12, 2021 guidelines are based on new evidence showing that the risks of daily low-dose…

Addressing Systemic Inequities Linked to Readmission Disparities for Minority Stroke Patients

Racial minorities are disproportionately affected by stroke, with Black patients experiencing worse post-stroke outcomes than White patients. Racial disparities in stroke outcomes have been linked to suboptimal control of risk factors such as hypertension, lack of access to health care, and decreased utilization of neurologic services. However, it was previously unknown if outcomes for Black ischemic stroke patients were affected by care settings with insufficient nursing resources.

5 Henry Ford Hospitals Earn Top Quality Recognition for Stroke Care Excellence

All of Henry Ford Health System’s five hospitals that are equipped to treat stroke earned Gold Plus and Honor Roll status for stroke care excellence from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

University Hospitals Earns National Recognition for Efforts to Improve Stroke Treatment

Several hospitals in the University Hospitals (UH) system have been recognized by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Quality Achievement Awards for their quality stroke care. Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke awards were developed to help healthcare professionals provide the most up-to-date, research-based guidelines for treating stroke patients.

Researchers: Majority of patients with Alzheimer’s disease would not have been eligible for clinical trials of new controversial Alzheimer’s drug    

In a research letter in JAMA, physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) found that the vast majority of patients who had a diagnosis of either cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, or Alzheimer’s disease related disorders, including cardiovascular disease, prior stroke, use of blood thinners, and age over 85 years, would have been excluded them from the aducanumab clinical trials.

Having MS Plus Depression May Be Tied to Increased Risk of Death

Depression is common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and a new study shows that people with both conditions may be more likely to die over the next decade than people with just one or neither condition. The study is published in the September 1, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that people with MS and depression have an increased risk of developing vascular disease such as heart attack and stroke.

Mount Sinai Queens Earns Prestigious Thrombectomy-Capable Stroke Certification From Joint Commission

The hospital achieved this recognition by meeting rigorous standards for performing endovascular thrombectomy and demonstrating continuous compliance with its performance standards.

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

People With Stroke Who Walk 30 Minutes Per Day May Have 54% Lower Risk of Death

MINNEAPOLIS – A new study shows that people who walk or garden at least three to four hours per week, or bike at least two to three hours per week, or the equivalent after having a stroke may have a 54% lower risk of death from any cause. The research is published in the August 11, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found the most benefit for younger stroke survivors. When people under the age of 75 exercised at least that amount, their risk of death was reduced by 80%.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

– COVID-19 NEWS: Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Shows Vaccine Likely Protects People with HIV
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Documents Stroke Risk in Cardiac Assist Device
– CBD Products May Help People with Epilepsy Better Tolerate Anti-Seizure Medications

Study finds recent change in EMS transport policy could improve stroke outcomes

A new EMS transport policy implemented in Chicago showed that sending patients suspected of experiencing large vessel occlusion directly to comprehensive stroke centers led to an increase in the use of endovascular therapy, an important treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

Mount Sinai Mobile Interventional Stroke Team Travels to Patients, Resulting in Faster Treatment and Better Outcomes

Study finds stroke patients are nearly twice as likely to be functionally independent if treated by a specialized team that travels to them to perform surgical clot removal

Muscle Protein That Makes Vertebrates More Fit Linked to Limited Lifespan

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.

Women less likely than men to receive opportune care after stroke, study finds

Women are less likely than men to receive timely care for strokes caused by blockages in large vessels, known as emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO), according to researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Mount Sinai’s J Mocco, MD, to Lead the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

J Mocco, MD, MS, Senior Vice Chair, Director of the Cerebrovascular Center, and Co-Director of the Neuroendovascular Surgery Fellowship Program in the Department of Neurosurgery at Mount Sinai, has been named president-elect of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS), a scientific and educational association dedicated to advancing the specialty of neurointerventional surgery, effective July 29, 2021.

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Increased Risk of Second Stroke, Death

People with larger waistlines, high blood pressure and other risk factors that make up metabolic syndrome may be at higher risk for having a second stroke and even dying than people who do not have metabolic syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Bidirectional impact of cardiovascular disease, cancer in Blacks focus of new AHA center

Cardiovascular disease and cancer, the nation’s top two killers, share common ground like obesity and chronic inflammation, as well as a disproportionate impact on Black Americans. A new American Heart Association-funded center at the Medical College of Georgia is working…

UK HealthCare, Partners Receive Prestigious CDC Grant to Improve Stroke Care, Outcomes in Kentucky

UK HealthCare, UofL Health, the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program (KHDSP), and other state partners have been awarded the prestigious Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program Grant by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This $1.8 million grant aims to optimize both stroke prevention among those at high risk as well as improve the care and outcomes for stroke patients throughout Kentucky.

After Stroke, More than One Try to Remove Blood Clots May Be Tied to Worse Outcome

After a stroke, doctors can try to remove clots in blood vessels to keep blood flowing freely to the brain. But even though most of these procedures are successful, less than half of people have a successful recovery from the stroke. A new study published in the June 23, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, sheds light on why that may be.

New Cleveland Clinic Research Identifies Link Between Gut Microbes and Stroke

New findings from Cleveland Clinic researchers show for the first time that the gut microbiome impacts stroke severity and functional impairment following stroke. The results, published in Cell Host & Microbe, lay the groundwork for potential new interventions to help treat or prevent stroke. The research was led by Weifei Zhu, Ph.D., and Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute.