In your head: How brain-monitoring tech advances could change the law

An ankle-bracelet for criminal offenders, what about a brain-bracelet?

A world-first report from University of Sydney Law School scrutinises advances in neurotechnology and what it might mean for the law and the legal profession. The paper calls for urgent consideration of how the new technology is to be regulated. It also asks how neurotechnology may affect the legal profession.

Bleak Cyborg Future from Brain-Computer Interfaces if We’re Not Careful

The most promising method to achieve real-world BCI applications is through electroencephalography, a method of monitoring the brain’s electrical activity. EEG-based BCIs will require a number of technological advances prior to widespread use, but more importantly, they will raise a variety of social, ethical, and legal concerns. Researchers conducted a review of modern commercial brain-computer interface devices and discuss the primary technological limitations and humanitarian concerns of these devices in APL Bioengineering.

Reduction in Insomnia Symptoms Associated with Non-invasive Neurotechnology

For people with chronic insomnia, a good night’s sleep is elusive. But what if insomnia symptoms could be alleviated by simply listening to one’s own brainwaves? Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Health conducted a clinical trial that showed reduced insomnia symptoms and improved autonomic nervous system function using a closed-loop, acoustic stimulation neurotechnology.