Forty years of nursing science in HIV/AIDS: JANAC marks progress and challenges

From the very beginning of the AIDS epidemic in 1981, nurses have been at the forefront of patient care, advocacy, and research. But even in the age of antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis, many challenges remain in reducing the impact of HIV and AIDS, according to the special May/June issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Poor Grasp of Dating Violence in College Perpetuates ‘Boys Will be Boys’ Views

A study to understand the dating violence experience and perpetration of college-age women, as well as how they conceptualize violence in dating relationships, reveals normalization of unhealthy violent behaviors where sexual pressure or sexualized verbal harassment are viewed as an innate part of men, supporting the idea that “boys will be boys.” Study participants demonstrated a lack of knowledge of the forms of dating violence and its consequences. They accepted, rationalized and provided excuses for these acts of violence.

Writing the history of feminism in the South and Appalachia: WVU researcher earns prestigious Carnegie award

There’s more to the American women’s movement of the 1960s and 1970s than burning bras and Gloria Steinem.

Jessica Wilkerson, associate professor of history at West Virginia University, wants to change that narrative to its truest form: The fight for women’s rights was built on the shoulders of women of color, the working class and women in the south and Appalachia – not just white-collar urbanites.

In women, higher body fat may protect against heart disease death, study shows

A new UCLA study shows that while men and women who have high muscle mass are less likely to die from heart disease, it also appears that women who have higher levels of body fat — regardless of their muscle mass — have a greater degree of protection than women with less fat.

March Special Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Focuses on Women’s Health in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

The March issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology features new clinical research involving sex and gender, including effects of GI and liver conditions on pregnancy, gender disparities in diet and nutrition, Barrett’s esophagus incidence in women with scleroderma, factors influencing whether women pursue advanced endoscopy careers, endoscopy-related musculoskeletal injuries, sex hormone association with increased prevalence of certain types of cancer, and more.

Antibiotics for C-sections Effective After Umbilical Cord Clamped

Antibiotics for cesarean section births are just as effective when they’re given after the umbilical cord is clamped as before clamping – the current practice – and could benefit newborns’ developing microbiomes, according to Rutgers co-authored research. The study, by far the largest of its kind and published in the journal Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control, challenges current recommendations for antibiotic use. Administering antibiotics after clamping does not increase the risk of infection at the site of C-section incisions, the study concludes.

Researchers Find that Expansion of Medicaid Under the Affordable Care Act Improved Maternal Health for Low-Income Women

The period of time before pregnancy is critically important for the health of a woman and her infant, yet not all women have access to health insurance during this time. New research finds that the expansion of Medicaid for many states under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) had a positive impact on a variety of indicators of maternal health prior to conception.

Group is established to connect, inspire and empower UCI women in technology

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 12, 2020 — To connect, inspire and empower women working, researching and teaching in technology-related fields across campus, the University of California, Irvine has established a new diversity affinity group, Women in Technology at UCI. Through strategic partnerships, career development, educational events and networking activities, Women in Technology at UCI will strengthen the community of women in technology on campus.

With upcoming DembVP pick, expert available to discuss positives and negatives for women in politics

As Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden prepares to announce his vice presidential pick, who will be only the third woman VP nominee and fourth woman on a major-party presidential ballot, political scientist Lori Poloni-Staudinger is available to discuss the significance…

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Mothering in domestic violence: protecting children behind closed doors

As emerging data shows an alarming rise of domestic violence during the pandemic, researchers at the University of South Australia are urging practitioners to look beyond clinical observations and focus on the strengths that mothers exercise to protect their children from domestic abuse.

Women Underrepresented in Academic Hospital Medicine Leadership Roles, Study Finds

In recent years, the number of women who entered U.S. medical school surpassed the number of men. But gender inequities still exist in many areas of medicine. Of academic hospital medicine programs, 79% are run by men, Johns Hopkins researchers report in a new paper published March 3 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and male hospitalist leaders are more likely to have attained the rank of full professor than women leaders.

Nonprofits benefit from having women on executive board

In the non-profit sector, women comprise the majority of nonprofit employees, while they are still the minority on boards. Having a substantial number of women on boards benefits nonprofits, according to a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Election 2020: Expert says more women in representative government means less corruption

As Super Tuesday approaches, Virginia Tech economist Sudipta Sarangi will be available to discuss the role of women in representative government leadership roles and their impact on corruption. According to a study led by Sarangi, government corruption is less prevalent…

New study shows pregnant women with HIV often not given recommended treatment

Pregnant women living with HIV don’t always receive antiretroviral medications recommended for use in pregnancy, according to a recent study published in Jama Network Open this week. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago’s researchers collaborated in the multi-site Surveillance Monitoring for ART Toxicities (SMARTT) study of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) network.

Moderate to Heavy Drinking During Pregnancy Alters Genes in Newborns, Mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies’ DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.