Female heart patients less likely to have additional problems fixed during surgery

Two studies led by Michigan Medicine find that female patients who undergo heart surgery are less likely to have secondary ailments corrected during a procedure — despite guidelines that indicate they should. Researchers say it adds to growing evidence that women are undertreated across the spectrum of cardiovasvular care.

Mpox continues to circulate at low numbers among gay and bisexual men who have sex with men

Mpox continues to circulate in the U.S. among gay and bisexual men who have sex with men. Though the number fell sharply to only 3 cases during the June through December 2023 multisite surveillance period compared to the previous highs, concern for its reemergence continues due to, among other things, incomplete knowledge among other groups.

U.S. Drug-related Infant Deaths More than Doubled from 2018 to 2022

Drug-involved infant deaths more than doubled (120% increase) from 2018 to 2022, with the greatest proportion of deaths in 2021 (25.8%). The most prevalent underlying causes of death included assault (homicide) by drugs, medicaments and biological substances (35.6%).

Stress Activates Brain Regions Linked to Alcohol Use Disorder, Differently for Women Than Men

When exposed to stress, people with alcohol use disorder engage parts of the brain associated with both stress and addiction, which may cause them to drink or crave alcohol after a stressful experience, suggest the authors of a study published in Alcohol: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Study Underscores Social Factors of Low Breast Cancer Screening in the U.S.

To identify major social factors hindering breast cancer screening in U.S. women aged 40 and older, researchers focused on race/ethnicity, employment, education, food security, insurance status, housing and access to quality health care. Access to health care emerged as a statistically significant theme (61 percent) and insurance status was the most reported sub-categorical factor. Language was the third highest issue, highlighting its significance as an influential factor of screening behavior. Race/ethnicity, sex/gender and sexual orientation were additional factors reported.

Women stroke survivors believe they will receive worse care in the emergency room

Women who have survived a stroke believe they are less likely to receive adequate emergency care – based on gender and race or ethnicity, a study shows. Researchers say future studies must focus on whether the beliefs these women hold about emergency care are leading to delays in stroke care.

UC Irvine-led study links long-term air pollution exposure to postpartum depression in SoCal

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 31, 2023 — Long-term maternal exposure to common air pollutants, both before and after childbirth, has been linked to increased risk of postpartum depression for mothers – with symptoms ranging from anxiety and irritability to suicide – and may lead to cognitive, emotional, psychological and behavioral impairments in their infants, according to research led by the University of California, Irvine.

Social media and low self-compassion behind rise in cosmetic surgery

When Kylie Jenner famously admitted that her signature pout was the result of lip fillers, there was a significant increase in interest and uptake of the cosmetic procedure. That’s the power of social media. But why is social media so persuasive and what is driving young women’s attitudes to cosmetic surgery?

Maintaining Stable Weight Increases Longevity Among Older Women

UC San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science researchers investigated the associations of weight changes later in life with exceptional longevity and found that women who maintained their body weight after age 60 were more likely to reach exceptional longevity.

The American Dental Hygienists’ Association Announces New Leadership for 2023-2024

On July 5, as the 2023 ADHA Annual Conference got underway at McCormick Place in Chicago celebrating the association’s 100th anniversary, the American Dental Hygienists’ Association installed a new Board of Directors, along with ADHA’s new slate of officers for the fiscal year. Newly installed president, Becky Smith, CRDH, EdD, FADHA, spoke in both English and Spanish to the national and state leaders who attended the ceremony, focusing on the power of unity.

Kroc Institute releases special report on implementation status of gender approach within Colombian Peace Agreement

The Peace Accords Matrix at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies has released a new special report outlining the current implementation status of the gender approach within the 2016 Colombian Peace Accord. The implementation of the gender approach has been fundamental to guaranteeing the protection and promotion of the rights of women and LGBTQ+ people.

UC Irvine Police Department commits to advancing women in law enforcement

The University of California, Irvine Police Department is among law enforcement agencies nationwide committing to the 30×30 Pledge, which is a collection of low- and no-cost actions to improve the representation and experiences of women in law enforcement. These actions can help policing agencies assess the current state of a department regarding gender equity; identify factors that may be driving disparities; and develop and implement strategies and solutions to eliminate barriers and advance women in policing.

Exposure to green space linked to reduced risk of postpartum depression

In an analysis of more than 415,00 electronic health records of healthy, full-term births in Southern California, a team of researchers led by the University of California, Irvine determined that exposure to green space and tree coverage was associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression among mothers.

US falls far behind most of the world in support for fathers and caregivers of aging adults

Today, the WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD) at UCLA, launched “Equality within Our Lifetimes,” the most comprehensive analysis to date of laws and policies related to gender equality in all 193 U.N. member states. While the U.S. performs well in some areas, it has become even more of an outlier when it comes to care.

FAU Receives $1 Million NSF Grant to Empower Women in STEM Faculty

The three-year NSF ADVANCE ADAPTATION grant will help transform faculty diversity and ensure appropriate representation of women in STEM. This grant continues the work of the late Emmanuelle Tognoli, Ph.D., who served as a research professor in FAU’s Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences within the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science and a member of the FAU Stiles-Nicholson Brain Institute.

UCI-led study finds pay practices, job barriers to blame for women making less than men

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 28, 2022 — Despite advances in gender equality, women still earn less than men in all advanced, industrialized societies. Who – or what – is to blame? A new 15-country study led by Andrew Penner at the University of California, Irvine, divides fault evenly between inequitable within-job salary structures and the decisions that route men and women into differently compensated roles.

Sylvester’s Sexual Health After Cancer Program Expands to Meet Needs of Women with Cancer

Kristin E. Rojas, M.D., FACS, FACOG, assistant professor of surgical oncology in the DeWitt Daughtry Department of Surgery and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University Miami Miller School of Medicine, realized she had struck a chord with women being…