To Boost a Preschooler’s Language Skills, Consider Reminiscing

Book sharing is a popular way parents engage young children in conversation. Not all parents are comfortable with book sharing and not all children like having books read to them. Research provides an alternative. To boost the quality of a preschooler’s language experience and skills, consider reminiscing with them. Findings show reminiscing is very good at eliciting high quality speech from parents, and in many ways, is just as good as book sharing (wordless picture books).

FAU and Mainstreet Research National Poll Reveals Immigration and Incivility Key Issues for Voters

Immigration and incivility are two major issues that continue to inform voter behavior and expectations in U.S. politics and the 2024 the presidential election, according to the latest national poll by the FAU Political Communication and Public Opinion Research Lab (PolCom Lab) and Mainstreet Research.

Does Your Community Have a Personality Type?

U.S. counties and regions differ in political ideology. But do they differ in personality as well? Further, are people who ‘fit’ their communities healthier, happier, or more highly achieving than those who do not? A new study shows communities are diverse in terms of personality as well as demographics, and having like-minded people in one’s community is associated with positive outcomes.

GW Experts Available: Biden Administration Unveils Highly-Anticipated Executive Order on AI

The Biden Administration unveiled a highly-anticipated executive order on artificial intelligence (AI) today. According to The Washington Post, it marks the U.S. government’s most significant attempt yet to regulate the fast-moving technology. The order streamlines high-skilled immigration and heralds the use of AI…

GW Expert Available: President Biden Teases Highly Anticipated Executive Order on AI

This week, U.S. President Joe Biden teased a highly anticipated executive order on artificial intelligence in the coming weeks. There were no details about the order, which was first announced in July. Biden also reiterated the United States’ commitment to working with international…

GW Experts Available: Stage is Set for Second GOP Presidential Debate

The stage is set for the second Republican presidential debate tonight in California. Seven candidates are looking to be the party’s alternative to former President Donald Trump, who is not participating in tonight’s debate. Trump skipped the first debate and…

U.S. Drug Overdose Deaths More Than Quadrupled from 1999 to 2020

Regardless of race, age, geography or urbanization, drug overdose deaths in the U.S. more than quadrupled from 1999 to 2020, causing 1,013,852 deaths. The rates increased 4.4 times from 6.9 per 100,000 in 1999 to 30 per 100,000 in 2020.

DNA Decodes the Dining Preferences of the Shell-Shucking Whitespotted Eagle Ray

With mighty jaws and plate-like teeth, the globally endangered whitespotted eagle ray can pretty much crunch on anything. Yet, little information is available on critical components of their life history in the U.S., such as their diet.

GW Expert: Rise in Burn Injuries During Extreme Heat Wave in the U.S.

Hospitals and burn centers in the Southwest United States are reporting an increase in burn injuries from touching everyday surfaces that are baking under record temperatures. According to The Wall Street Journal, burn centers are treating people who touch hot door…

Study Explores Incarceration, Employment and Re-offense During COVID-19 Pandemic

The study not only examined the effects of the transitional employment program participation on employment and recidivism, but also looked at the program’s mechanisms such as hours worked and hours spent in cognitive behavioral interventions and three employment sectors – construction, kitchen and warehouse/retail – on future system involvement.

U.S. Infant Mortality Declined, But Low Birth Weight, Preterm Births Increased

Researchers examined time trends and racial inequities in infant mortality, low birth weight and preterm births from 2007 to 2019. Results showed that from 2014 to 2019 infant mortality fell, while low birth weight and preterm births rose. For all three indicators, researchers reported significant inequities between white and Black infants. When compared with white infants, Black infants experienced a significant twofold greater infant mortality and low birth weight and one-and-a-half times greater preterm birth rate.

Majority of Nurses Attribute Well-Being Struggles to Staffing Shortages

With projected national shortages of 63,720 registered nurses in 2030 and 141,580 licensed practical nurses in 2035, a new survey finds one-third of nurses plan to leave the profession in the next two years.

Alarming Rates of Teen Suicide Continue to Increase in the U.S.

A study exploring trends in suicide rates among 13 to 14 year olds from 1999 to 2018 shows rates more than doubled from 2008 to 2018, following a rise in social media and despite significant declines in suicide mortality in this age group previously from 1999 to 2007. These trends were similar in urban and rural areas but were more common in boys in rural areas where firearms are more prevalent. Suicides occurred significantly more often between September and May and were highest on Monday followed by the rest of the weekdays, suggesting school stress as a contributor.

FAU’s Cheryl A. Krause-Parello, Ph.D., to be Inducted into ‘2023 International Nurse Research Hall of Fame’

Krause-Parello’s innovative research focuses on the human-animal bond. She developed and is the director of the university-based health research initiative for veterans, Canines Providing Assistance to Wounded Warriors (C-P.A.W.W. ™), a program established to advance the health and well-being of members of the armed forces.

Global Study First to Compare COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among College Students

A cross-cultural comparison study is the first to investigate factors that influenced the decision to get the COVID-19 vaccine in an international sample of college students from the U.S., Israel and the Czech Republic. Results provide evidence of country-specific varying perceptions of susceptibly, severity, benefits and barriers associated with a virus and vaccine.

Study Finds Disparate Gender Differences in Victims of Child Sex Trafficking

Youth involved in sex trafficking have extensive victimization experiences during childhood, and these experiences vary by gender. In the nationally representative study, 75 percent were males and 25 percent were females. Almost two-thirds of the girls were molested as a child, half were raped, and three-fourths were emotionally abused as a child, compared to 36 percent of males who were molested, 31 percent who were raped, and 37 percent who were emotionally abused. Eighty percent of females reported three or more victimization types compared to males (49 percent), and 31 percent of females experienced all five types of prior victimization compared to 11 percent of males.

Could Changes in Fed’s Interest Rates Affect Pollution and the Environment?

Can monetary policy such as the United States Federal Reserve raising interest rates affect the environment? According to a new study, it can. Results suggest that the impact of monetary policy on pollution is basically domestic: a monetary contraction or reduction in a region reduces its own emissions, but this does not seem to spread out to other economies. However, the findings do not imply that the international economy is irrelevant to determining one region’s emissions level.

New Braintrust Seeks to Launch Era of North American Regional Competitiveness

Given the U.S.-China trade conflict and concerns over trade disruptions caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, regionalizing supply chains is at the center of the discussion in North America. Now, a new working group spearheaded by the University of California San Diego is using this opportunity to propose policy recommendations for the relocation of global production chains in North America where it’s economically advantageous.

State of the Union preview with a Nobel Laureate invitee

Binghamton University Distinguished Professor and Nobel Laureate M. Stanley Whittingham will join U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer in the nation’s capitol tonight for U.S. President Joe Biden’s State of the Union address. Whittingham is available for interviews via Zoom at 3 p.m. EST today to highlight Binghamton’s growing role in the lithium battery industry.

FAU Study Finds Low Salinity Can Work to Culture Popular Florida Pompano Fish

Less than 10 aquaculture farms in the U.S. have been successful in commercially raising and distributing the popular Florida pompano fish. A new study has determined the optimal salinity required to culture fingerlings (juvenile fish) from hatch to weaning under on-farm conditions. Researchers have shown it’s possible to grow this warm water marine species in salinities a low as 10 parts per thousand, which makes it more economic and easier for producers far from the coast to attempt Florida pompano commercial growth.

Needs and Challenges for COVID-19 Boosters and Other Vaccines in the U.S.

FAU researchers and collaborators provide the most updated guidance to health care providers and urge how widespread vaccination with these boosters can now avoid the specter of future and more lethal variants becoming a reality.

Pandemic Escalated Teen Cyberbullying – Asian Americans Targeted Most

A study of U.S. middle and high school students shows that about 17 percent were cyberbullied in 2016 and 2019, but that proportion rose to 23 percent in 2021. Notably, 19 percent of Asian American youth said they had been cyberbullied, and about 1 in 4 (23.5 percent) indicated they were victimized online because of their race/color. Asian American youth were the only racial group where the majority (59 percent) reported more cyberbullying since the start of the COVID‐19 pandemic. In 2019, Asian American youth were the least likely to have experienced cyberbullying.

Pritzker Molecular Engineering professors David Awschalom and Liang Jiang awarded $1 million for development of South Korea-U.S. quantum center

The National Research Foundation of South Korea (NRF) has awarded two professors from the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) $1 million to co-lead the creation of a South Korea-U.S. joint research center dedicated to quantum error correction. Prof. David Awschalom and Prof. Liang Jiang will serve as co-principal investigators for The Center for Quantum Error Correction, which seeks to improve the fidelity of networked quantum computing systems.

Feeling Anxious or Blue? Ultra-processed Foods May be to Blame

A study measuring mild depression, number of mental unhealthy days and number of anxious days in 10,359 adults 18 and older found those who consumed the most ultra-processed foods as compared with those who consumed the least amount had statistically significant increases in the adverse mental health symptoms of mild depression, “mentally unhealthy days” and “anxious days.” They also had significantly lower rates of reporting zero “mentally unhealthy days” and zero “anxious days.” Findings are generalizable to the entire U.S. as well as other Western countries with similar ultra-processed food intakes.

What Has America Learned Since Hurricane Katrina? Not Enough.

Researchers found a lack of preparedness, specifically to evacuate carless and vulnerable populations. Only seven cities had strong plans, including Charlotte, North Carolina; Cleveland; Jacksonville; Miami; New Orleans; New York; and Philadelphia. Twenty cities achieved a moderate rating, six cities had a weak rating and 17 plans were not available or do not exist. Among the cities with plans not found include Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Minneapolis.

JMIR Formative Research | Competition & Integration of Health Systems Post COVID-19

JMIR Publications published a study titled “Competition and Integration of US Health Systems in the Post-COVID-19 New Normal: Cross-sectional Survey” in JMIR Formative Research, which reported that the smaller the geographical region in which mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activity is pursued, the higher the likelihood that monopolistic tendencies will result.

‘Beam Me Up:’ Nation’s First Quantum Drone Provides Unrivaled Security

Researchers are developing the nation’s first drone-based, mobile quantum network for unhackable wireless communication. The network includes drones, a ground station, lasers and fiber optics. In war, these drones would provide one-time crypto-keys to exchange critical information, which spies and enemies would not be able to intercept. Quantum protects information using the laws of nature and not just by a clever manmade code.

Hero’s Encounter: Leading Geriatrician and World War II Veteran Share Bond

An internationally renowned geriatrician and advocate for seniors and a 98-year-old World War II veteran hero are a dynamic duo whose paths recently crossed. They have a common bond: to improve care and quality of life for Americans and people throughout the world.

Dryer, warmer night air is making some Western wildfires more active at night

Firefighters report that Western wildfires are starting earlier in the morning and dying down later at night, hampering their ability to recover and regroup before the next day’s flareup. A study shows why: The drying power of nighttime air over much of the Western U.S. has increased dramatically in the past 40 years.

UCLA Research Finds that U.S. Sick Leave Policies Widen Racial Inequalities, Lag Nearly Every Other Country

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD) released the first study to systematically analyze how common sick leave eligibility criteria in the U.S. affect access and to examine sick leave policies globally to understand whether these criteria are necessary. The research found marked racial and gender gaps in leave access in the U.S. due to restrictions targeting workers at small businesses, part-time workers, and workers at new jobs.

Language Trade-off? No, Bilingual Children Reliably Acquire English by Age 5

A first-of-its kind study in U.S.-born children from Spanish-speaking families finds that minority language exposure does not threaten the acquisition of English by children in the U.S. and that there is no trade-off between English and Spanish. Rather, children reliably acquire English by age 5, and their total language knowledge is greater to the degree that they also acquire Spanish. Children’s level of English knowledge was independent of their level of Spanish knowledge.

Establishing Juneteenth as national holiday is opportunity to create “new America”

The Senate has unanimously passed a bill to establish Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, as a federal holiday. This is an historic moment and an opportunity to create a “new America,” according to Anne Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York and director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity.

Rutgers Experts Available to Discuss New U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 22, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick professors Robert E. Kopp and Pamela McElwee are available for interviews on President Biden’s new plan, unveiled on Earth Day, for the United States to roughly halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. “Stabilizing the global…

Nuclear War Could Trigger Big El Niño and Decrease Seafood

A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment, shows that turning to the oceans for food if land-based farming fails after a nuclear war is unlikely to be a successful strategy – at least in the equatorial Pacific.