Nuclear War Could Trigger Big El Niño and Decrease Seafood

A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment, shows that turning to the oceans for food if land-based farming fails after a nuclear war is unlikely to be a successful strategy – at least in the equatorial Pacific.

Marine Fisheries Will Not Offset Farm Losses after Nuclear War

After a nuclear war, wild-catch marine fisheries will not offset the loss of food grown on land, especially if widespread overfishing continues, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. But effective pre-war fisheries management would greatly boost the oceans’ potential contribution of protein and nutrients during a global food emergency, according to the study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study for the first time explored the effects of nuclear war on wild-catch marine fisheries.

Former U.S. Ambassador available to answer key questions about current conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan

Intense fighting erupted September 27th between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh which may soon escalate to full-scale war. Former U.S. Ambassador Carey Cavanaugh is available to comment on what led to this clash, as well as the growing prospect that…

Banning Covert Foreign Election Interference

The United States is one of the countries that is most susceptible to foreign election interference. To safeguard the U.S. elections in November, Robert K. Knake argues that the United States and other democracies should agree to not interfere in foreign elections.

The Rise of Digital Dictators, With Andrea Kendall-Taylor

Andrea Kendall-Taylor, senior fellow and director of the Transatlantic Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss the increasing use of technology by authoritarian regimes. Kendall-Taylor’s article “The Digital Dictators: How Technology Strengthens Autocracy,” coauthored with Erica Frantz and Joseph Wright, can be found in the March/April 2020 issue of Foreign Affairs.

The Trouble With Election Security

Russia interfered with the U.S. presidential election in 2016, and in 2018, internet trolls again spread disinformation during the midterms. Intelligence officials warn that interference in this year’s presidential election may already be underway.

Global Cooling After Nuclear War Would Harm Ocean Life

A nuclear war that cooled Earth could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, according to the first study of its kind.

Tulane University professor William Brumfield receives Russian Order of Friendship Medal

Tulane University professor and contemporary American historian William Brumfield has spent much of his life traveling the vast and remote lands of Russia and documenting its unique architecture, history and literature. On Thursday, Dec. 5, Brumfield’s nearly 50 years of work and dedication was recognized by the Russian Federation during a ceremony at the Russian Embassy in Washington, D.C., where Russian Ambassador to the United States Anatoly Antonov presented Brumfield with the Order of Friendship medal, the highest state decoration of the Russian Federation given to foreign nationals.

Turkey’s military aggression in Syria is as unlawful as Russia’s in Ukraine, Notre Dame expert says

Turkey continues its military operation in northeast Syria to control a major swath of Syrian territory, moving the Kurdish population far from its border, and Notre Dame Law School Professor Mary Ellen O’Connell, a renowned expert on international law, calls it lawless. “Turkey’s ground…

Scientists Discover New Antibiotic in Tropical Forest

Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a “plant probiotic,” more robust plants and other antibiotics. Probiotics, which provide friendlier bacteria and health benefits for humans, can also be beneficial to plants, keeping them healthy and more robust. The new antibiotic, known as phazolicin, prevents harmful bacteria from getting into the root systems of bean plants, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Nature Communications.