Nuclear War Could Trigger Big El Niño and Decrease Seafood

A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment, shows that turning to the oceans for food if land-based farming fails after a nuclear war is unlikely to be a successful strategy – at least in the equatorial Pacific.

Researchers use drones, machine learning to detect dangerous ‘butterfly’ landmines

Using advanced machine learning, drones could be used to detect dangerous “butterfly” landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

Applying Deep Learning to Automate UAV‐Based Detection of Scatterable Landmines

Recent advances in unmanned‐aerial‐vehicle‐ (UAV‐) based remote sensing utilizing lightweight multispectral and thermal infrared sensors allow for rapid wide‐area landmine contamination detection and mapping surveys. We present results of a study focused on developing and testing an automated technique of…

Military waste has unexpected consequences on civilians, the environment

The military waste that results from the United States military’s drive to remain permanently war ready has unexpected consequences on civilians and the environment, according to a new book by a faculty member at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Doomsday Clock and Nuclear and Climate Threats

New Brunswick, N.J. (Jan. 23, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Alan Robock, an expert on nuclear winter, climate change and geoengineering, is available to discuss the Doomsday Clock moving to within 100 seconds of midnight today. “Humanity continues to face two…