Blank pieces of paper at Chinese protests actually say a lot

Demonstrators in China have recently begun to hold blank pieces of paper at protests. While the paper might say nothing, protesters are sending a clear message, according to Dave Clark, an expert in global protest movements and professor of political…

SEIR Model to Address the Impact of Face Masks amid COVID-19 Pandemic

When vaccines are not available, alternative strategies are required to decrease SARS-CoV-2 transmission. Behavior of the population and government regulations, such as hand hygiene, quarantine of exposed persons, isolation of symptomatic persons, and travel restriction, play an essential role in…

Higher socioeconomic status linked to increased air pollution exposure in China

For the first time, a University of Washington led team has uncovered that people living in China who have a higher socioeconomic status are actually more exposed to outdoor air pollution, also known as ambient air pollution. This finding runs contrary to existing studies conducted throughout North America, which have shown that higher pollution levels tend to be experienced among people with lower socioeconomic status.

HOW WILL HUMANS SURVIVE A GLOBAL CATASTROPHE?

One suggested way to save humankind in the event of a deadly pandemic or other extreme global catastrophe is establishing a safe refuge – on an island or in such far-out places as the moon or under water — where a portion of the human population can stay alive.

Policy, farm management help China mitigate climate change

Production of animal protein in China has increased by 800% over the past 40 years, driven by population growth, urbanization and higher worker wages. However, the amount of climate-warming nitrous oxide released from animal farming in the country has not risen as quickly, thanks to science-led policy and farm management interventions in the way animals are fed and their manure recycled.

Space Race with China: expert talk & interview availability

A New Space Race? Rediscovering Star Wars and the new High Frontier Tuesday, July 13 at 4PM EDT. The Foreign Press Association is hosting a critical talk by space policy and business expert Professor Greg Autry on China’s advances in…

Under climate stress, human innovation set stage for population surge

Instead of a collapse amid dry conditions, development of agriculture and increasingly complex human social structures set the stage for a dramatic increase in human population in central plains of China around 3,900 to 3,500 years ago.

Scientists Say Farewell to Daya Bay Site, Proceed with Final Data Analysis

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment collaboration – which made a precise measurement of an important neutrino property eight years ago, setting the stage for a new round of experiments and discoveries about these hard-to-study particles – has finished taking data. Though the experiment is formally shutting down, the collaboration will continue to analyze its complete dataset to improve upon the precision of findings based on earlier measurements.

Local cooking preferences drove acceptance of new crop staples in prehistoric China

The food preparation preferences of Chinese cooks — such as the technological choice to boil or steam grains, instead of grinding or processing them into flour — had continental-scale consequences for the adoption of new crops in prehistoric China, according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. A new study in PLOS ONE led by Xinyi Liu, associate professor of archaeology in Arts & Sciences, focuses on the ancient history of staple cereals across China, a country well known for its diverse food products and early adoption of many domesticated plants.

Most Nations Failing to Protect Nature in COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Plans

The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to reset the global economy and reverse decades of ecosystem and species losses, but most countries are failing to invest in nature-related economic reforms or investments, according to a Rutgers-led paper.

China’s ecological restoration projects deplete terrestrial water stores

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 10, 2020 – Through concerted, policy-driven efforts, China has converted large swaths of desert into grassland over the past few decades, but this success has come at a cost. In a study published recently in Nature Sustainability, scientists at the University of California, Irvine report that the Asian nation’s environmental reclamation programs have substantially diminished terrestrially stored water.

Up-to-Date Leading Cancer Treatment Recommendations from NCCN Now Available in Chinese

NCCN announces new and updated Chinese language versions of NCCN Guidelines for AML, Breast Cancer, CLL/SLL, Colon Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Head and Neck Cancers, Hodgkin Lymphoma, Melanoma (Cutaneous), Multiple Myeloma, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas, and T-Cell Lymphomas.

Social work’s role in the health, well-being of LGBTQ people in China

As China’s government seeks solutions to social problems related to an evolving society, professional social work is increasingly entering new areas, including migrant and aging services, and is poised to take on a larger role in assisting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people, said two experts from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

TikTok ban reasonable given the threat of Chinese surveillance

The House of Representatives voted this week to ban TikTok from government-issued devices amid concerns that the Chinese-owned social media company’s access to U.S. data poses a national security threat.   Sarah Kreps, professor of government at Cornell University, studies misinformation…

Trade Wars with China Could Cost U.S. Universities $1.15 Billion

Uncertainties around the trade war between the U.S. and China have hurt businesses and weighed on the global economy. However, new research from the University of California San Diego also shows lesser known consequence: up to $1.15 billion in reduced tuition to U.S. universities.

Can community-based interventions help to close the epilepsy treatment gap?

More than 50 million people have epilepsy; about 80% live in lower- or middle-income countries, where diagnosis and treatment can be difficult or impossible. The percentage of people with epilepsy that is not receiving treatment is known as the treatment gap; in some countries, this gap exceeds 90%.

Suspended studies and virtual lab meetings: How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting epilepsy researchers

How was epilepsy research forced to morph during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic? Researchers from 11 countries shared their experiences and thoughts on the future of laboratory research, clinical trials, and in-person conferences.

Rutgers Expert Can Discuss Ethnic or Exotic Crops in N.J., Mid-Atlantic

New Brunswick, N.J. (June 9, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick ethnic crop research specialist Albert Ayeni is available for interviews on growing non-native crops in New Jersey and the mid-Atlantic, including exotic peppers, okra, roselle (sorrel), tropical spinach (amaranths) and…

People Who Felt Knowledgeable About COVID-19 at Time of Outbreak More Likely to Report Positive Mood

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Assistant Professor Haiyang Yang finds in a new study that people who perceived themselves as knowledgeable about COVID-19 – regardless of the actual amount of their knowledge – experienced more happiness during the outbreak than those who didn’t perceive themselves as informed about COVID-19.

High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases

High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences.