Space Race with China: expert talk & interview availability

A New Space Race? Rediscovering Star Wars and the new High Frontier Tuesday, July 13 at 4PM EDT. The Foreign Press Association is hosting a critical talk by space policy and business expert Professor Greg Autry on China’s advances in…

Under climate stress, human innovation set stage for population surge

Instead of a collapse amid dry conditions, development of agriculture and increasingly complex human social structures set the stage for a dramatic increase in human population in central plains of China around 3,900 to 3,500 years ago.

Scientists Say Farewell to Daya Bay Site, Proceed with Final Data Analysis

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment collaboration – which made a precise measurement of an important neutrino property eight years ago, setting the stage for a new round of experiments and discoveries about these hard-to-study particles – has finished taking data. Though the experiment is formally shutting down, the collaboration will continue to analyze its complete dataset to improve upon the precision of findings based on earlier measurements.

Local cooking preferences drove acceptance of new crop staples in prehistoric China

The food preparation preferences of Chinese cooks — such as the technological choice to boil or steam grains, instead of grinding or processing them into flour — had continental-scale consequences for the adoption of new crops in prehistoric China, according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. A new study in PLOS ONE led by Xinyi Liu, associate professor of archaeology in Arts & Sciences, focuses on the ancient history of staple cereals across China, a country well known for its diverse food products and early adoption of many domesticated plants.

Most Nations Failing to Protect Nature in COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Plans

The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to reset the global economy and reverse decades of ecosystem and species losses, but most countries are failing to invest in nature-related economic reforms or investments, according to a Rutgers-led paper.

China’s ecological restoration projects deplete terrestrial water stores

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 10, 2020 – Through concerted, policy-driven efforts, China has converted large swaths of desert into grassland over the past few decades, but this success has come at a cost. In a study published recently in Nature Sustainability, scientists at the University of California, Irvine report that the Asian nation’s environmental reclamation programs have substantially diminished terrestrially stored water.

Up-to-Date Leading Cancer Treatment Recommendations from NCCN Now Available in Chinese

NCCN announces new and updated Chinese language versions of NCCN Guidelines for AML, Breast Cancer, CLL/SLL, Colon Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Head and Neck Cancers, Hodgkin Lymphoma, Melanoma (Cutaneous), Multiple Myeloma, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas, and T-Cell Lymphomas.

Social work’s role in the health, well-being of LGBTQ people in China

As China’s government seeks solutions to social problems related to an evolving society, professional social work is increasingly entering new areas, including migrant and aging services, and is poised to take on a larger role in assisting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people, said two experts from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

TikTok ban reasonable given the threat of Chinese surveillance

The House of Representatives voted this week to ban TikTok from government-issued devices amid concerns that the Chinese-owned social media company’s access to U.S. data poses a national security threat.   Sarah Kreps, professor of government at Cornell University, studies misinformation…

Trade Wars with China Could Cost U.S. Universities $1.15 Billion

Uncertainties around the trade war between the U.S. and China have hurt businesses and weighed on the global economy. However, new research from the University of California San Diego also shows lesser known consequence: up to $1.15 billion in reduced tuition to U.S. universities.

Can community-based interventions help to close the epilepsy treatment gap?

More than 50 million people have epilepsy; about 80% live in lower- or middle-income countries, where diagnosis and treatment can be difficult or impossible. The percentage of people with epilepsy that is not receiving treatment is known as the treatment gap; in some countries, this gap exceeds 90%.

Suspended studies and virtual lab meetings: How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting epilepsy researchers

How was epilepsy research forced to morph during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic? Researchers from 11 countries shared their experiences and thoughts on the future of laboratory research, clinical trials, and in-person conferences.

Rutgers Expert Can Discuss Ethnic or Exotic Crops in N.J., Mid-Atlantic

New Brunswick, N.J. (June 9, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick ethnic crop research specialist Albert Ayeni is available for interviews on growing non-native crops in New Jersey and the mid-Atlantic, including exotic peppers, okra, roselle (sorrel), tropical spinach (amaranths) and…

People Who Felt Knowledgeable About COVID-19 at Time of Outbreak More Likely to Report Positive Mood

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Assistant Professor Haiyang Yang finds in a new study that people who perceived themselves as knowledgeable about COVID-19 – regardless of the actual amount of their knowledge – experienced more happiness during the outbreak than those who didn’t perceive themselves as informed about COVID-19.

High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases

High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences.

Study: Asian universities close the gap on U.S. schools in world rankings by increasing STEM funding

China and South Korea are surging in the international brain race for world-class universities, as schools in the East Asian nations are replacing institutions in the United States in international college rankings. The rise is fueled by increased government funding and a focus on STEM.

How Old are Whale Sharks? Nuclear Bomb Legacy Reveals Their Age

Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s have helped scientists accurately estimate the age of whale sharks, the biggest fish in the seas, according to a Rutgers-led study. It’s the first time the age of this majestic species has been verified. One whale shark was an estimated 50 years old when it died, making it the oldest known of its kind. Another shark was an estimated 35 years old.

Outcomes of Coronavirus Patients Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in China Offers Guidance for Management of Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients Worldwide

The initial experience of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) management for coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) patients in Shanghai, China provides guidance for management of critically ill COVID-19 patients worldwide, reports a study in the ASAIO Journal. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

The Rise of Digital Dictators, With Andrea Kendall-Taylor

Andrea Kendall-Taylor, senior fellow and director of the Transatlantic Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss the increasing use of technology by authoritarian regimes. Kendall-Taylor’s article “The Digital Dictators: How Technology Strengthens Autocracy,” coauthored with Erica Frantz and Joseph Wright, can be found in the March/April 2020 issue of Foreign Affairs.

CFR-Wayne State Election 2020 U.S. Foreign Policy Forum

How can business, labor, and government collaborate to reduce poverty on regional and global bases? Will the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement benefit U.S. workers? How will the trade war with China affect the automotive industry?

Watch an in-depth, nonpartisan conversation on critical foreign policy challenges facing the winner of the 2020 presidential election. Former government officials from Republican and Democratic administrations will discuss issues central to our national security and answer questions about U.S. policy and America’s role in the world.

Is China Being Fair on Trade?

“Made in China.” You’ve probably seen this label on your clothes, toys, and other everyday products. China’s reach has skyrocketed in recent decades, disrupting the global trading system as we know it. This video is part of the Inside the Issues video series, featuring CFR Vice President of Studies Shannon K. O’Neil. Watch as she helps explain and clarify common misconceptions surrounding international issues such as China’s trade practices, green jobs, and immigration.

Public health, nursing expert: Coronavirus: Health care workers must protect themselves even if employers won’t

Faculty Q&AAs the coronavirus spreads throughout the country, an increasing number of American health care workers helping to treat patients are contracting the infection.Christopher Friese.Christopher Friese, the Elizabeth Tone Hosmer Professor of Nursing at the School of Nursing and professor of health management and policy at the School of Public Health, leads a research team focused on health care delivery in high-risk settings.

How a Magnet Could Help Boost Understanding of Superconductivity

Physicists have unraveled a mystery behind the strange behavior of electrons in a ferromagnet, a finding that could eventually help develop high temperature superconductivity. A Rutgers co-authored study of the unusual ferromagnetic material appears in the journal Nature.

Expert analysis by Thunderbird’s Doug Guthrie: The Age of Cooptation: The Cost of Doing Business in Xi’s China

The Age of Cooptation: The Cost of Doing Business in Xi’s China (Business, China, China Capitalism, International Trade, Supply Chain, Xi Jinping, Covid19, Coronavirus)   By Doug Guthrie The cost of doing business in China today is a high one,…

Expert: Coronavirus fears have caused stocks to plunge, but investors shouldn’t be concerned

Binghamton University offers live or pre-taped interviews powered by a state-of-the-art ReadyCamtelevision studio system, available at a moment’s notice. Our system can broadcast live HD audio and video to networks, news agencies, and affiliates interviewing Binghamton faculty, students, and staff.…