UNH Research: More Than One Way for Animals to Survive Climate Change

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that to live in hotter more desert-like surroundings, and exist without water, there is more than one genetic mechanism allowing animals to adapt. This is important not only for their survival but may also provide important biomedical groundwork to develop gene therapies to treat human dehydration related illnesses, like kidney disease.

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Climate change cut farming productivity growth 21% since 1960s

Despite important agricultural advancements to feed the world in the last 60 years, a Cornell University-led study shows that global farming productivity is 21% lower than it could have been without climate change. This is the equivalent of losing about seven years of farm productivity increases since the 1960s.

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Under climate stress, human innovation set stage for population surge

Instead of a collapse amid dry conditions, development of agriculture and increasingly complex human social structures set the stage for a dramatic increase in human population in central plains of China around 3,900 to 3,500 years ago.

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Coronavirus: a wake-up call to strengthen the global food system

A new commentary in the journal One Earth highlights not only climate-related risks to the global food system, such as drought and floods, but also exposes the coronavirus pandemic as a shock to the system that has led to food crises in many parts of the world. To address the challenges of a globally interconnected food system, a systems approach is required.

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Humanity’s best hope for confronting the looming climate crisis rests with the new science of complexity. Roland Kupers offers insights in his new book, A Climate Policy Revolution: What the Science of Complexity Reveals about Saving Our Planet

Roland Kupers offers insights in his new book, A Climate Policy Revolution: What the Science of Complexity Reveals about Saving

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